Shuiyue Palace

Shuiyue Palace, Guangzhou

Shuiyue Palace
4
Ancient Ruins • Religious Sites
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
What people are saying
Douglas M
By Douglas M
Water Moon Palace
Oct 2018
Don’t expect to see a palace like Buckingham Palace, Versailles Palace or the Doge’s Palace, this is a small local Buddhist temple in a village back street. However, don’t let that put you off visiting, this place is the real deal. This is a small working village temple. Even though the village has been subsumed into vast urban sprawl of GuangZhou it still retains its village feel. Believe you me, this place is difficult to find! Even SWMBO couldn’t find directions to it. Finding it became her challenge. We took the B21 bus from the end of the road, then on the driver’s advice we transferred to the B19 bus to get to the BRT stop of TangXiaCun which is the stop for TangDong Village. Note: Buses numbers prefixed with ‘B’ are part of the BRT (Bus Rapid Transport) network of dedicated bus lanes and stops. Same flat fare (2 Yuan) as ordinary buses. Get a bus card rather than pay cash, some accept payment via your mobile phone which is something I’ve yet to try. At the dedicated BRT stops you pay as enter the stop and not on the bus. Anyway, at the TangXiaCun stop we exited on the south side. The stands are prefixed with S for South, and N for north. SWMBO stopped and asked three taxi drivers but they’d never heard of ShuiYue Gong (Palace in Chinese) but one helpful denizen pointed north across the road saying they’re the old villages. We walked up the road to WalMart and crossed over the bridge. We then walked back past the TangXia FuShan archway with it’s relief celebrating Mao’s visit. I say past, but we actually walked into FuShan, turned left just before the market and found another ‘palace’ (FuShanMiao) and had a look around. Not a TA site but well worth the diversion. SWMBO chatted to the locals as best she could, they speak their own Cantonese dialect, and a local chap offered, for 20 Yuan, to take us on his three-wheeled truck to the next village where we’d find ShuiYue Palace. Seated on a plank of wood and hanging on for dear life we returned to the main road, turned left and went against the traffic for a 100 metres or so, turned left onto the pavement, whizzed under another arch and along another shopping street. Another couple of hundred metres, a sharp right scattering the card players, wiggle around a corner or two and we were outside ShuiYue Palace. Luckily the Palace was open! A very nice old lady asked for a 5 Yuan donation for the privilege of looking around, SWMBO proffered 10 Yuan. She had no change, but a handful of joss-sticks was even better. While she and SWMBO chatted, I looked around. No concrete pillars just carved stone, so definitely Qing. As ever I looked up to see tiled frescos and lots of lovely woodwork in the roof. By now SWMBO had got her joss-sticks smoldering and was busy asking for favours at each of the three alters. I found the temple cat and gave her some cat-biscuits from my man-bag which I reckon is more propitious. The bouncing journey there meant that the clean toilet was visited. Half-an-hour and we’d seen everything. The old lady followed us out of the door and locked it behind her saying she was going to drink tea and listen to the Cantonese opera which we could hear wailing away in the communal yard just around the corner. Were we going? We stood outside and admired the small shrine next to the temple which looks remarkable like a sentry box, a next to that is a private family temple. A few more photos and we migrated towards the sound of Cantonese opera. We listened for a few minutes, it really is an acquired taste however the band were good! Then we wandered back along the shopping street to the main road and BRT stop, swiped our cards at the entrance and took the B16 bus from the N1 (N for north) gate all the way to YunTai Gardens (TA reviewed) where we dined at one of the nice restaurants. A short bus ride and we were back at our apartment to feed the gold fish and cat.

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Douglas M
Guangzhou, China1,973 contributions
Water Moon Palace
Oct 2018 • Couples
Don’t expect to see a palace like Buckingham Palace, Versailles Palace or the Doge’s Palace, this is a small local Buddhist temple in a village back street. However, don’t let that put you off visiting, this place is the real deal. This is a small working village temple. Even though the village has been subsumed into vast urban sprawl of GuangZhou it still retains its village feel.

Believe you me, this place is difficult to find! Even SWMBO couldn’t find directions to it. Finding it became her challenge. We took the B21 bus from the end of the road, then on the driver’s advice we transferred to the B19 bus to get to the BRT stop of TangXiaCun which is the stop for TangDong Village.

Note: Buses numbers prefixed with ‘B’ are part of the BRT (Bus Rapid Transport) network of dedicated bus lanes and stops. Same flat fare (2 Yuan) as ordinary buses. Get a bus card rather than pay cash, some accept payment via your mobile phone which is something I’ve yet to try. At the dedicated BRT stops you pay as enter the stop and not on the bus.

Anyway, at the TangXiaCun stop we exited on the south side. The stands are prefixed with S for South, and N for north. SWMBO stopped and asked three taxi drivers but they’d never heard of ShuiYue Gong (Palace in Chinese) but one helpful denizen pointed north across the road saying they’re the old villages. We walked up the road to WalMart and crossed over the bridge.

We then walked back past the TangXia FuShan archway with it’s relief celebrating Mao’s visit. I say past, but we actually walked into FuShan, turned left just before the market and found another ‘palace’ (FuShanMiao) and had a look around. Not a TA site but well worth the diversion. SWMBO chatted to the locals as best she could, they speak their own Cantonese dialect, and a local chap offered, for 20 Yuan, to take us on his three-wheeled truck to the next village where we’d find ShuiYue Palace.

Seated on a plank of wood and hanging on for dear life we returned to the main road, turned left and went against the traffic for a 100 metres or so, turned left onto the pavement, whizzed under another arch and along another shopping street. Another couple of hundred metres, a sharp right scattering the card players, wiggle around a corner or two and we were outside ShuiYue Palace.

Luckily the Palace was open! A very nice old lady asked for a 5 Yuan donation for the privilege of looking around, SWMBO proffered 10 Yuan. She had no change, but a handful of joss-sticks was even better. While she and SWMBO chatted, I looked around.

No concrete pillars just carved stone, so definitely Qing. As ever I looked up to see tiled frescos and lots of lovely woodwork in the roof. By now SWMBO had got her joss-sticks smoldering and was busy asking for favours at each of the three alters. I found the temple cat and gave her some cat-biscuits from my man-bag which I reckon is more propitious. The bouncing journey there meant that the clean toilet was visited. Half-an-hour and we’d seen everything.

The old lady followed us out of the door and locked it behind her saying she was going to drink tea and listen to the Cantonese opera which we could hear wailing away in the communal yard just around the corner. Were we going?

We stood outside and admired the small shrine next to the temple which looks remarkable like a sentry box, a next to that is a private family temple. A few more photos and we migrated towards the sound of Cantonese opera.

We listened for a few minutes, it really is an acquired taste however the band were good!
Then we wandered back along the shopping street to the main road and BRT stop, swiped our cards at the entrance and took the B16 bus from the N1 (N for north) gate all the way to YunTai Gardens (TA reviewed) where we dined at one of the nice restaurants. A short bus ride and we were back at our apartment to feed the gold fish and cat.
Written October 25, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Frequently Asked Questions about Shuiyue Palace

Shuiyue Palace is open:
  • Sun - Sat 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM