We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Painted Dog Conservation

Features Animals
Save
Share
Book In Advance
Why Book on TripAdvisor?
  • Tour highlights & full itinerary
  • Easy online booking
  • Lowest price guaranteed
More Information
22
All photos (22)
Full view
Traveler Overview
  • Excellent50%
  • Very good35%
  • Average14%
  • Poor1%
  • Terrible0%
Travelers talk about
“painted dog”(26 reviews)
“wild dogs”(15 reviews)
About
Contact
Opposite Hwange National Park Airport, Hwange, Zimbabwe
Website
+263 18 710
Call
Reviews (107)
Filter reviews
94 results
Traveler rating
46
33
14
1
0
Traveler type
Time of year
LanguageEnglish
More languages
46
33
14
1
0
Show reviews that mention
All reviews painted dog wild dogs endangered species great job well worth a visit hwange national park gift shop rehabilitation centre bush camp dedicated staff interesting information main camp conservation project support donation visitors
FilterEnglish
Updating list...
1 - 10 of 94 reviews
Reviewed 1 week ago via mobile

Well worth the visit. Such a worthwhile project in a difficult cultural location. Surprisingly well presented.

Thank Tom T
Reviewed 4 weeks ago via mobile

We were staying at the Kuluha Camp and had the rare experience to see these animals. Suck a treat to see they have been reintroduced into existence. The preserve highlights the plight of the dogs

Thank M Richard M
Reviewed August 22, 2018

They do a great job teaching everyone about this animal and how/why it has become endangered. They give you a tour and tell a story as you go through the exhibit to help you grasp the nature of the animals and why they are endangered....More

Thank Ferg42995
Reviewed June 29, 2018

I love painted (wild) dogs and had an opportunity to see them in the Okavanga Delta of Botswana. We passed the sanctuary on our way to visit a camp in Hwange NP and arranged with our camp for a visit on our way back out....More

1  Thank Robert C
Reviewed May 23, 2018

We drove from Hwange NP when we noticed a sign pointing to this conservation centre so we gave it a try. First you come into a great museum like hall with lot of interesting information about painted dogs. A beautiful wooden sidewalk leads to a...More

Thank Raptor1234567890
Reviewed May 21, 2018 via mobile

I was really impressed by this centre, a proper conservation project with incredibly dedicated staff. The love they have for Roman, their permanent painted dog resident, is touching. I know that everyone wants to see (or walk with...) lions, but I highly recommend visiting this...More

Thank souku
Reviewed May 20, 2018

Had a very informative visit to the project with the highlight being a personal visit to the Bush camp which is run for village children to explain the importance of conservation of all the animals in Hwange. They spend 4 days in the camp ,...More

Thank Dennis J
Reviewed November 8, 2017

The staff are obviously super dedicated and the work they do is great, for the conservation, but the visit was boring and we didn't see any painted dogs- which is best for them since they should not be used to people but must stay wild....More

Thank Flore N
Reviewed September 7, 2017

Old Farts Safari was very impressed by this sanctuary. Very well laid out info centre with knowledgeable staff on hand to talk to. We arrived just as the power went off but was soon sorted with a generator! Well worth a visit to learn more...More

Thank Lucy S
Reviewed July 15, 2017

We visited this attraction as part of a small tour group. We were given a tour of a little museum where they have exhibits on the life of the Painted Dog (formerly called Wild Dogs) and learned a lot from the guide. However, while they...More

Thank barbara361
View more reviews
Questions & Answers
Get quick answers from Painted Dog Conservation staff and past visitors.
Note: your question will be posted publicly on the Questions & Answers page.
Submit
Posting guidelines