Red Basilica (Kizil Avlu)
Red Basilica (Kizil Avlu)
4

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles171 reviews
Excellent
64
Very good
48
Average
43
Poor
12
Terrible
4

Thomas V
Oakland, CA16,975 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Couples
After the Acropolis, this is the major site in this city. It is up the hill from the valley and is red because it was built with bricks. Many of the bricks have fallen down from weather and earthquakes, and now it is a ruin. It was once very large, built many centuries ago.
Written May 15, 2024
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skyeador
Ankara, Türkiye21 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2017 • Couples
You can enter it, there are parts of it still open, and the outdoors ground filled with artifacts and sculptures is still open to see, but there is an entrance fee, albeit not expensive. and the basilica itself is closed for renovation, so you can't enter it, just see it from outside though it's not much of a sight right now because of all the construction surrounding it. Once it opens, it is a must-see place because of it's incredible beauty and history. Located quite centrally, it's worth a short visit.
Written February 15, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jazzumbo
Romania2,084 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2018 • Family
Monumental ruins of a temple built by a Roman emperor to worship Egyptian gods in the second century AC.
Three hundred years later, the temple was damaged by Byzantines, as they converted it into a Christian church, dedicated to Saint John, which was destroyed by the forces of an Arab general around 717 AC, after his unsuccessful attempt to conquer Constantinople. Finally, the ruins fell into Ottoman hands after 1336 and partially converted into a mosque (the North rotunda). The South rotunda became house for an olive oil press, at some point.
After such a dramatic history, there's not much left to visit nowadays from the former Roman architectural masterpiece, except from the South rotunda and walls of what used to be the main temple, about 2000 years ago.
During summertime, there are classic concerts hosted between these walls, and it's cool to attend one, if you're around.
The entrance fee is less than one USD.
Written September 22, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ansh D
Hong Kong, China51 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2016 • Solo
The cathedral-sized Red Hall, sometimes called the Red Basilica, was originally built as a giant temple to the Egyptian gods Serapis and Isis in the 2nd century AD. It’s still an imposing-looking place, though rather scattered and battered. The main structure was temporarily closed for renovation.

During its pagan pomp, this must have been an awe-inspiring place. In his Book of Revelation, St John the Divine wrote that this was one of the Seven Churches of the Apocalypse, singling it out as the ‘throne of the devil’. The building is so big that the early Christians didn’t convert it into a church but built a basilica inside it dedicated to St John, of course. The most intact section, the southern rotunda, was used for religious and cult rituals; once covered in marble panels, it is now red brick.
Written May 22, 2016
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bitteroranges1
Vilnius, Lithuania65 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2014 • Friends
The tickets are really cheap so do not hesitate and visit the site. However, I was perplexed by the inattentiveness of the Turkish Government because the Basilica is in a very poor condition. I personally don't like the way they are restoring the temple - the marble is toowhite and seems like something artificial and out of context. The heads of statues were on the ground with no postaments or whatever else. However, the Basilica is (or was) truly impressive and huge so don't miss it.
Written December 30, 2014
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BobPraz
Toronto, Canada238 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2014 • Solo
The red basilica building is huge and can be seen easily from outside the fence surrounding the site. The interior of the main building is currently off limits while long-needed renovations take place to reinforce the crumbling walls, which means the remains of the church inside are not accessible. However, the site can still be entered and the fee is only 5 Turkish lira, which is very little and therefore worth the cost for seeing things a little more up close.

The original enormous red-brick building was a Roman temple for the worship of Egyptian deities, which resulted in a weird and unique decoration blending Roman and Egyptian motifs. There is one reconstructed example on the south side of the building of one of the courtyard columns in the shape of the Egyptian goddess Sekhmet, with a lion's head and a Roman-looking human body. You can also currently enter the southern cupola, which exhibits a few other fragments of the original sculpture and marble decoration. The northern cupola is not accessible and appears to be still used as a mosque, accessible from outside the site.

All in all, renovations notwithstanding, I thought this was a pretty cool place.
Written August 5, 2014
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Malcolm S.
Singapore, Singapore579 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2013 • Friends
When i went to Bergama in Sep/Aug 2013 this year, this attraction was closed for re construction work. Pretty nice structure that you will not miss as you make your way to the acropolis. I took a number of pictures here of the exterior structure. Based on what i read, it will not be re-open anytime soon.
Written October 6, 2013
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Seo15
Hamburg, Germany33 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2020
We did not know this Basilica before and walked in because it is in the center of the town, nice to have a look in
Written January 5, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Charles P
Hamilton, OH35 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Couples
I suggest seeing this on the way to the Acropolis or you might be disappointed. The best feature is the standing walls made of red brick. The original structure had to be an awesome site but now there’s not much else to see except a replica of some Egyptian god. As the Christian churches weakened, most of them compromised and this one apparently turned into an Egyptian temple. The relics from here are in the museum in Bergama which also houses many relics from the Acropolis. If you see this after the Acropolis, be prepared to yawn and then go find something to eat.
Written June 12, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

aakgz
Istanbul, Türkiye159 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018 • Friends
İt is in the old city center and one of the must see places in Bergama. İf you are interested in history you need to see and feel the history there.
Written April 24, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Red Basilica (Kizil Avlu), Bergama

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