We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The Tripadvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Qala'at al-Hosn (Krac des Chevaliers)

41 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.

Qala'at al-Hosn (Krac des Chevaliers)

41 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
41Reviews1Q&A
Traveler rating
  • 31
  • 8
  • 1
  • 0
  • 1
Traveler type
Time of year
Language
  • More
Selected filters
  • Filter
  • English
Popular mentions
Damien wrote a review May 2019
Tralee, Ireland3,346 contributions496 helpful votes
+1
A bit of a drive but well worth seeing In good condition Horse stables very big and nice Good staff Very safe but many road check points I recommend penguin travel I don’t recommend Turkish airlines
Read more
Date of experience: May 2019
1 Helpful vote
Helpful
Share
Mathias S wrote a review Apr 2019
333 contributions88 helpful votes
Today it's called Qal'at al-Hisn, which means "the fortress of the fortress" actually. But it's mostly known as Crac des Chevaliers, Crac of the Riders (knight hospitaliers), Crac being an analogy to Al-Karak in Jordan (Kerak des Moabites) and a deformation of an earlier Arabic name, Hisn al-Akrad, the fortress of the Kurds. It was captured by Mamluk sultan Baybars in 1271, there is his inscription on one of the pillars inside. It is located in a passage between the Lebanon mountains and the An-Nusayriyya mountains. And it rose to importance in the crusader period, when it was part of the county of Tripoli, was given to Knight Hospitaliers and became the sit of the grand master of that order. His window is adorned with small sculpted flowers. It is a concentric castle, made of two levels, built of a bright stone. It has several towers. For the best view, go a bit further from it, the view from the town is not nice. There are also cellars where you can't enter in theory, but no-one guards them. There are many interiors. A nice refectary with some sculptures close to the entrance. A chapel (with remains of paintings), with a minaret. Very big stables. A big hall with a central big pillar with Baybars' inscription. And many, many passages. There is a nice view of the hills around it from the upper side of it. There is a village next to it, partly Christian. I've been there twice
Read more
Date of experience: May 2018
Helpful
Share
Torres G wrote a review Aug 2017
Al Jubail, Saudi Arabia27 contributions7 helpful votes
I visited this palace before the war, sometime in the fall of 2010. It was not listed in my travel itinerary, in fact i had never heard of it before. However, my Syrian guide and driver was insistent. He had taken me to Palmyria the day before, and I trusted him so I agreed. We had to rush to get there by car since it closes at 4 and it is a long drive up hill you would have to hold your breath as the slopes are steep. The view of the countryside from the castle is simply spectacular. I think it's a 11th/ 13th century medieval castle, which has a small Gothic church on the upper level, a stable large enough for about a hundred horses and large moat which is already dry. The walls are huge and thick made of very solid rock. There are nice alleys, passage ways and steps you would need at least an hour to walk around. You can get a very good view of the town and the rest of the Syrian landscape from here. If you are into medieval art and warfare, check out the National Museum in Damascus for bow and arrows, swords, metal gear and ware used by the Knights of Chevalier. It's all there. I hope the war in Syrian has not damage this place as it is an incredible piece of architecture.
Read more
Date of experience: September 2016
1 Helpful vote
Helpful
Share
Ahmed Ammouri wrote a review Aug 2017
82 contributions28 helpful votes
For all history lovers, it is a must see castle. There is so much history there like you wouldn't believe. I recommend booking a tour with the local guide there, it's about 10$ and it's totally worth it.
Read more
Date of experience: September 2016
Helpful
Share
Damien Mc Sweeney wrote a review Mar 2017
Cork, Ireland154 contributions61 helpful votes
Was lucky enough to visit here as I was passing after doing work locally. We asked the security about a visit despite it being closed and the allowed us in for a look. It was in surprising good conditions, especially given the present circumstances. I look forward to visiting again in better times ahead
Read more
Date of experience: May 2016
Helpful
Share
Previous