Tomb of Mariam Zamani
Tomb of Mariam Zamani
4

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles61 reviews
Excellent
19
Very good
23
Average
16
Poor
2
Terrible
1

Tatiana A
Paris, France1 contribution
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2013 • Solo
Mariam Zamani's story reminds me that of Prince William because she was Armenian as the ancestor of Prince William was also an Armenian who married an Indian woman and whose granddaughter travelled to GB. to give an Armenina-Indian connection.

Though people all over the world because of the film Jodha-Akbar, Jodha was not Salim's mother, neither she was Akbar's wife. It is an artistic story oriented towards the modern state of India to prove closeness of Muslims and Hindous.

Mariam's tomb was built in the Christian compound by her son Emperor Jahandir. It cannot have minarets because she was not Muslim ! As you know Akbar invited many Armenians from Persia to make a foreign trade and many Armenians had high positions in his court. Mariam herself was number One of all the Moghols women in the sea trade. When one of her ships was seized by the Portuguese, her son punished severely the Portuguese. I highly recommend to visit the place as it is a part of the Word's history. Knowing what other peoples have done for India will help everbody to be more tolerant towards others ! I remember Lady's Di picture where she was sitting alone with Taj Mahal behind her. Unfortunately I did not know her Indian connection at that time but now many things become so clear and so evident ! God Bless You !
Written October 12, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Anuradha Manjul
Lucknow, India403 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2016
We had planned a night halt in Agra while coming back from Jaipur by road. The plan was to reach Agra by around 1.00 pm and then visit Sikandara complex. Next day post check out visit either the tomb of I’timād-ud-Daulah (father of Noor Jehan) or Taj Mahal (why we dropped the idea of visiting the tomb of I’timād-ud-Daulah is a story in itself)

I had been to Sikandara complex as a child (6 or 7 year old, I still have those black and white photographs from my dad’s collection who is an internationally trained photographer) when the place was not managed the way it’s being managed now. The only memories I had of the complex was that there was a big gate to go inside and then there used to be a small pond like empty structure where the Langurs were playing. Beyond that I had no memories of Sikandara.

The Sikandara complex has changed, though the gate and the pond like structure were still there. Some parts have been restored and restoration work was going on some areas. The only thing which was missing was details about the complex. I hope the ASI takes care of it soon. Lack of official details forces people to rely on guides, and this necessity, aides a lot many self styled untrained guides. Sikandara also had a hoard full of such guides including many middle aged ladies who probably are residents of locations nearby. You tell a lie a thousand times and it becomes the truth. This is what was happening there, for a small amount they were shelling out historically inaccurate stories probably heard from some other similar members.

While showing the graves in the Sikandara complex – these self styled guides talked about Sikandara being the resting place of Akbar’s first wife (this is completely inaccurate) and that his Christian wife was buried some distance away in a tomb (the tomb of Mariam-uz-Zamani), his hindu wife aka Jodha Bai was cremated at Arjun Nagar and there is a Chattri (similar to Gaitor) in her memory (historical inaccuracy at its height).

Felt like killing these self styled guides who were dishing out this historical nonsense. But more than them we have Mr. Ashutosh Gowarikar to blame for this – through his ill researched movie Jodha Akbar he has strengthened this false belief of Akbar’s Hindu wife Jodha, how important she was and how much he loved her.

In fact, Indu Sundaresan’s ‘Taj Mahal Trilogy’ are far better researched and historically accurate books on this, a tele-series called ‘Siyasat’ based on her book ‘The Twentieth Wife’ was telecast on Epic channel (and currently EPIC is doing its reruns).

I could see the impact of the crap supplied by the self styled guides along with the information from ‘Siyasat’ on many tourists, especially a 15 member Bengali group where there were many middle aged and elderly ladies. A middle aged lady kept on explaining her group who Akbar’s first wife was (the Pasha (Padshah) begum – a term she had picked up from the serial) and how cruel she was and why her grave was not next to Akbar. Many lies, incorrect information – Lo and Behold, the truth had been created.

The fact is different. The Chattri in Arjun Nagar is said to be of Jodha; no, there was no Jodha Bai who was Akbar’s wife, this Jodha is Jehangir’s wife, princess of Jodhpur, her real name was Jagat Gosain and she was not cremated as per Hindu rites but she was buried here.

Akbar had 300 wives/consorts, whether there was someone of Christian origin in these 300 is another matter of research but among his important wives there was no Christian lady who would have got such a huge burial space. One fact that should hit tourists who are visiting Sikandara and listening to this crap is that a there will be no tomb which will be made for a Christian lady – she would be buried in a Christian graveyard, where her grave might have an elaborate gravestone.

Coming back to this mysterious tomb.

This tomb is around a kilometer away from the main Sikandara complex. Its’ located on the other side of the road and not immediately visible from the main road, one has to take a left turn onto a small lane. Thankfully there is a clear signage about the tomb on the main road. Yes the tourism department wishes people to visit this but other than putting up clear signage, there is lot more which needs to be done to attract more tourists.

There was no proper parking area. We parked our vehicle as close as possible to the gate. There were a few two wheelers parked. The area looked quite unsafe. The tomb area is fenced with common metal fence. There was a wooden cabin which was serving as a ticket counter (yes, there is an entry ticket to this tomb, though the amount is minimal but I think this would help in some way to maintain the garden areas). There was a non uniformed person standing at the gate probably to check tickets. When we entered, he checked with me if I had a video camera with me, my still camera was anyway hanging in my neck (there is no sign in the area which says photography or videography not allowed). I cross questioned him that why was he asking the same to which he gave a standard answer – photography nahin allowed hai (photography not allowed). I retorted asking him to show me the prohibition note. His answer was jao jao shor mat machao (go, don’t make noise). I was really annoyed – he had just allowed a couple to enter the complex without showing any tickets, probably he had got some money from them (this would have been a regular feature with him) and he had not asked them anything. I asked him why did he allow them and why didn’t he check with them, he was pretty sheepish and then smilingly asked my husband to go ahead, “Sir Main toh duty kar raha thaa, madam gussa ho gayin” (I was doing my duty, madam got angry).

We didn’t want to waste more time with him and thus moved ahead. Right next to the gate, there were two stone information slabs in Hindi and English, one on each side of the stone pathway. The square dome less tomb stands in the centre of a garden, where all efforts were being done to maintain the greenery.

This tomb is under ASI and some restoration work has been done. The information slabs clear the mystery – this tomb is of Mariam-uz-Zamani, Akbar’s wife who was the daughter of one Raja Bharmal. Yes, this is the tomb of Akbar’s famed Hindu wife, Rajput Princess, eldest daughter of Raja Bharmal of Amer. She was married to Akbar in 1562 and gave birth to Salim aka Jahangir in 1569. She was given the title Mariam-uz-Zamani (“Mary of the Age” – probably Akbar was in touch with the stories of Christianity at that point of time). She died in 1623 and Jahangir built this tomb for her (1623-1627). Her original name has not been mentioned on the information slab. Some historical sources of that time mention a name Heerak or Heer Kunwari, daughter of Raja Bharmal – so for all practical purposes Mariam-uz-Zamani is Heer Kunwari.

A point to be noticed here is that this tomb was not built from scratch. This tomb was originally an open baradari (pleasure pavilion) built during the reign of Sikandar Lodi in 1495 AD, which was adopted by the Mughals and converted into the tomb by making a crypt below the central compartment; reconstructing the four facades of the building with carved red stone panels and a chajja with addition of duchattis (mezzanine floors), the corners and remodelling the superstructure with Chattris and Chhaparkhats.

The chhatris and chhparkhats are the important ornaments in the whole composition. The tomb doesn’t have a dome and thus this mausoleum is of architectural importance in the category of dome less tombs of the Mughal era. Another important aspect of the tomb is that unlike other Mughal era structures, the rear entrance is not a dummy entrance, it’s a real entrance; the tomb is identical on both sides – front and rear.

The tomb is built of brick and mortar.The ornamentation (as per the records there was a decent amount of ornamentation) is not much visible now. On the exterior in the red stone structure, we could see few floral designs and wines vases (regular design feature of the Mughal era) but nothing much. The inside was pretty bare. The tombstone on the ground floor is nothing but a flat marble stone (nothing like the elaborate tombstones of the Mughal era).

The mausoleum contains three tombstones: one in the underground mortuary chamber, which is the grave itself; the cenotaph above it on the ground floor; and another cenotaph on the terrace.

The whole complex had a dark dejected feel to it.

It was as if through her final resting place, the hindu wife of Akbar was trying to tell the story of her life – a story of utter neglect and dejection, a story of loosing independence and dignity, a story of rejection by everyone including the two of the most important persons in her life – one to whom she was married to and the other whom she had given birth. The idea behind Sikandara was that Akbar wanted everyone of his immediate family members to be buried alongside him, but this wish was only partially fulfilled – his most important wife Ruqaiya Sultan Begum was buried in Garden of Babur in Kabul, as per her wishes (yes she is the same Padshah begum of that Bengali lady, Akbar’s first wife and she is not there in Sikandara as is proclaimed by the self styled guides), the other wife of importance Salima Sultan Begum was buried in Mandarkar Garden, Agra as per her wishes. And the Hindu wife who is wrongly popularised as the most loved one is buried a kilometre away in a corner, in a tomb which was not even constructed for her from scratch, a pleasure pavilion from the past, of a different dynasty was remodelled for her.

The tomb today is frequented by druggists and couples who want a cheap option to satiate their carnal desires. I am being too decent when describing them. These couples use the dark corners right next to the tomb area (with no regards for the dead) to tease the lady who is resting there – to show what she is missing now. These bold couples are ready to fight with tourists for their open bed spaces. We saw quite a few of them, the non uniformed person and probably many others provide them with complete security for a measly sum. The only people in the complex who were getting irritated with them were the gardeners who kept on requesting them not to walk on grass – a plea which was falling on deaf ears – so much so that a girl even shouted back saying I want to lie down in the middle of the garden, so I would walk on the grass. The activities of the couples along with the presence of the druggists is a deadly combination and a big unwanted incidence is just waiting to happen.

The eerie and uncomfortable feeling which we had was increased by the disregard by such people towards areas of national importance. We left the place with our heart filled with sadness.

The ASI and tourism department should focus on promoting these secluded areas also – there are lot many things in Agra beyond Taj Mahal, architecturally and historically important. Tour promoters should also focus on these areas. This would reduce the activities which we mentioned earlier.
Written October 28, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

KINGSHUK S
Uttar Pradesh, India494 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2012 • Couples
This is the neglected cenotaph, the tomb of Mariam, Emperor Akbar’s wife, mother of Prince Salim, who later succeeded Akbar as Emperor Jahangir in Mughal Throne.
Being the mother of the next emperor, Mariam should have basked in the glory of history. Instead she stays largely overshadowed by other luminous presence of other illustrious wives of Akbar like Jodhabai. May be Mariam had to pay the price of her son’s quest for freedom from the overpowering patriarchal influence of a dominating father; maybe she paid the price for showering her affection towards a lover-son, whose tale of sharing his heart with a danseuse (Anarkali) attained level of legend amongst the ballads of love.
And may be, following that historical tradition, even today, the tomb of Mariam, “Mariam Ka Maqbara” stands in desolation and solitude, isolated at the left hand side of National Highway-2 (Agra to Delhi route), while on the opposite side of the same bustling highway, Sikandra, the tomb of her own husband (Emperor Akbar) basks in glory of attention of tourists coming from world-over.
The only saving grace is: there is a prominent signboard besides the highway that points towards the narrow alley which leads to the tomb, which is situated less than a Km away from the highway with ample car parking space available near the tomb complex.
An overpowering sense of melancholy and solitude touches the heart when one reaches this isolated tomb. Time seems to stand still, a few stray dogs roam about in the manicured garden surrounding the tomb, Archeological Society of India appears to have taken some care and bounded the area with gate; but sadly enough the structure is not as ornate as Sikandra. Or is it that the same is not carefully preserved, the famous Mughal arts so carefully carved out in other Agra monuments, but absent here? The prominent vertical minarets with the distinctive tombs at the top in 4 corners of the monument, a characteristic of Mughal structure is prominent here.
In late afternoon, only a few locales prevail nearby; as the sun sets in, a strange sense of desolation engulfs the place. This beautiful tomb requires more attention from the tourist fraternity and ministry as a whole for a facelift and bringing it to the tourism mainstream so that more people visits it and the place becomes prominent.
Written November 29, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

josephcharlie11
London, UK1 contribution
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2013 • Couples
We visited this place during our vacation trip to Agra. This place is not hard to find as this place is located on NH2. Also there is a sign put up to direct people there. The place wasn’t crowded and is really isolated and has got a lonely feel to it. We were really bored. The garden was really neat though. The tomb was interesting but there is not much to look at.
Written October 9, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

NasehaAlok
Hyderabad, India515 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2016 • Family
The Queen whose son ruled the country lies neglected. The tomb is clean, nicely kept, but one can feel the sense of loss and the pain of being forgotten. Titled as Marium Zamani, mother of the masses (not accurate translation just to depict the sentiment), the Queen is forgotten. Very few histroy buffs or tourist go there. It is so forgtten that local autos etc dismiss or dissuade you going there, saying there is nothing there... nevertheless i liked this place and am happy that i could see this ignored monument.
Written July 21, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Vipul Singh
Gurugram (Gurgaon), India47 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2018 • Family
This place is close to Akbar's Tomb.
Very calm place, very nice greenery all around. Take water bottle with yourself because there is no shop for anything.
Written February 12, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

tripsmaker
266 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2016 • Solo
Mariam-uz-Zamani was the Hindu consort of Mughal emperor Akbar the Great and the mother of Jahangir. Her tomb is situated near the tomb of Akbar and built by Jahangir in memory of his mother. The square tomb is situated inside of a Mughal garden. The centre of the ground floor houses the cenotaph of Mariam. Exterior of the building was constructed by red sandstone. It's a place of tourist interest in Sikandara near Agra.
Written September 7, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Firdaus Ahmed
Fahaheel, Kuwait117 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2017 • Couples
It is said that Akbar build this tomb so all of Mughal's can buried here in together but unfortunately it wasn't happened. So now Jodha is buried here. As usual nice architecture. the only problem is its locations. Little bit far away from agra. So not highly recommended but if u have time do visit the tomb.
Also there is a wall where u can talk at 1 wall n can listen from other wall. Ans offcourse dont forget to click some nice pics.
Written June 26, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rajesh k
New Delhi, India534 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2016 • Friends
The Tomb of Mariam-Zamani is a 17th Century monument located near Sikandra, which is about 15 KMs away from Agra. Mariam-Zamani was the wife of the Mughal Emperor Akbar and the mother of Salim (Emperor Jahangir). She is also referred as Jodha Bai. Her tomb was built by Jahangir in Sikandra very close to Akbar's tomb. The tomb portrays Barhadri Architecture mixed with Mughal Architecture. There is a square tomb that stands in the center of the Mughal garden. The monument is beautifully ornamented. The red sandstone facade and panels with a variety of decorative designs, such as floral patterns look great. Floral paintings have faded away. Only traces can still be seen in the corners.
Written July 26, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

dooona
JPN36 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2015 • Friends
so maany flours there. recommend to visit spring there. also building is so beautiful. detail is so good !
Written March 12, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Showing results 1-10 of 45
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

Tomb of Mariam Zamani, Agra

All Agra HotelsAgra Hotel DealsLast Minute Hotels in Agra
All things to do in Agra
Day Trips in AgraAmusement Parks in Agra
RestaurantsFlightsVacation RentalsTravel StoriesCruisesRental Cars