Shaking Minarets
Shaking Minarets
4

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles108 reviews
Excellent
33
Very good
38
Average
30
Poor
7
Terrible
0

macedonboy
Glasgow, UK185,732 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
This attraction is confusing, some of the reviews are for the mosque and some are for the Brick Minaret. Going by the majority, the minarets of the mosque seems to be what remains of the facade of a mosque. It’s highly decorated in the Solanki style of Gujarat. It nice to look at, but if you’ve seen the architecture of the old city of Ahmedabad, then this is more of the same. Fine if you have time.
Written December 12, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

abhi
Gandhinagar District, India60 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2014 • Friends
A very good place in the heart of the city.
the art work done in this place is very good and its very peaceful place as well.
Written December 23, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

bishwaksen
Kolkata (Calcutta), India1,114 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2013 • Solo
The main problem with this place is that you can't go near the minarets. You can't really see any details from a distance and there is no shaking anywhere. Finding the place is another headache. It lies in a small bye lane and through a dirty market. Unless you have a guide with you, who knows the history of the place and get you in, there is no point going on your own.
Written September 6, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

sspatankar
Ahmedabad, India100 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Family
I had the privilege of watching them shaking..one has to go inside one of the minarets and push the wall and u will see the glass balls attached to the other minaret shaking. it is closed since last 30 years
Written June 10, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sanjiv M
Mumbai, India76 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2012 • Family
These shaking minarets are now closed for public, however, in my school days, I had visited them and have seen the shaking minarets in operation. There are actually 3 pairs of these minarets in the city. Two pairs are located very close to the Ahmedabad railway station. One in Kalupur, on the north end of the railway station and the other one in Sarangpur, on the southern end of the station. The 3rd pair is located in Gomtipur. During those days, when one minaret was shaken, by hand from the top, the other minaret also used to shake / vibrate simultaneously. People and visitors were allowed to enter the minarets and climb the way to the top. The narrow minarets were about 4 or 5 storeys tall. The narrow stairs leading all the way to the top. There was a small gallery around the periphery at each level, where visitors used to stand and experience the movements and vibration of the minaret. It's an engineering marvel sculpted entirely in stone.
Written February 23, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sadhan M
39 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Solo
THE SWAYING MINARETS
I have seen many architectural wonder-works in churches, mosques and temples the world over during my visits to many countries in different times. But I have not seen anything like Ahmedabad’s swaying minarets.
India is a repository of such wonders being the cauldron of many civilisations and cultures. People already know about the Taj Mahal or the Khajuraho temple. But there are other unique places to see in the country.
There are two mosques in the Ahmedabad. One is Sidi Bashir and the other is Raj Bibi. Their minarets were built in such a manner that if you shake one, which can be easily done, the other also shakes. The connecting passage between the two minarets however remains unshaken. This is a mystery that has not been solved.
Sidi Bashir mosque is near the railway station. Much of it is destroyed; only the central arch and the minarets remain. No one is allowed to shake the minarets now. I was fortunate to shake one of the minarets and see the other one sway some years ago.
The other mosque, Raj Bibi mosque, had similar swaying minarets. It is rumoured that one of its two minarets was dismantled by the British in a bid to unravel its mystery. They failed to find the secret of how it worked and could not put it back to its original position.
The temple at Benaras; the longest corridor at the Rameswaram temple; the Tanjavore temple; the temple at Simhachalam; the Jagannath temple at Puri and the Sun temple at Konarak; as well as the Dakhineswar Kalibari have architectures unique in history. So are the Padmanabhaswamy Temple of Kerala, and the Meenakshi temple of Madurai

In Delhi, there is the famous Lotus Temple, an architectural wonder; the exquisite Lakshmi Narayan temple built with red stone, and the Akshardham temple. The Jain Temple in Ranakpur rises majestically from the slope of a hill. The temple is supported by over 1444 marble pillars, carved in exquisite detail. Each pillar is differently carved. This is also the same in Bhubaneswar’s Raja Rani temple. There are thousands of nayikas engraved thereon but no two nayikas are similar to look at. Harmandir Saheb or the Golden Temple in Amritsar is another architectural great.
The famous Pasupati Nath temple in Kathmandu, Nepal; Borbodur temple in Java; Angkor Vat temple in Cambodia have no parallel. These are architectural wonders on their own merits.
I have seen the world famous cathedral in Rome as also Milan’s cathedral church. It took nearly six centuries to complete it and is the world’s fifth largest church. St. Mark’s Basilica is Venice’s church is built in Byzantine style. I have seen the wonderful architectural designs of French Churches in Paris including Saint Pierre de Montmartre and Notre Dame de Paris Cathedral. They are considered to be one of the finest examples of French Gothic architecture.
I have seen St. Sofia church in Sofia, Bulgaria and the Russian orthodox churches, especially St. Peter’s church in Moscow, and other churches in Kiev and elsewhere. The stunningly white Basilica of Our Lady of Delours is located in Trisur, southern India, is the tallest church in Asia.
The Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Família is a massive, privately-funded Roman Catholic Church that has been under construction in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain since 1882 and is expected to be completed by 2026. Considered a masterpiece by architect Antoni Gaudí (1852–1926), the project’s vast scale and peculiar design have made it one of Barcelona’s (and Spain’s) top tourist attractions.
Coming to the Mosque architecture, the mosque of Bibi Khanoum at Samarkhand is a wonderful symbol of architecture with blue tiles and intricate designs on it. In Cairo, there are many mosques but the great mosque of Mohammad Ali Pasha at the centre of Cairo is probably the best in architectural excellence and dimension. It is also called the Alabaster Mosque and is decorated with nicely crafted Islamic motifs.
In Istanbul, Turkey, there are many beautiful mosques, but the most beautiful one is the Blue Mosque. This is considered to be the greatest masterpiece of architecture anywhere in the world. The Abdul Rahman Mosque of Kabul and the Blue Mosque of Mazar-i-Shariff in Afghanistan are the most famous. The first one in fact is the biggest mosque in Afghanistan,
Written April 17, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

salman004
Ahmedabad, India50 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2015 • Friends
Great architectural wonder. Britishers had took away one of the shaking minarets for studying the technology; but they were unable to fix it back. Good place for a family outing.
Written February 24, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

tina c
Hyderabad, India80 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2014
Its located quite far from the city, this monument is now used by the local community for offering their prayers. One of the minarets have been ruined so the remains are there which can be seen. Just ok kind of place, would suggest if you really have time to kill then do visit, or if you are very much interested in the history probably you can give a try.
Written December 29, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

GrainVodka
Jodhpur, India515 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Family
I visited this place with my cousins and elders; I was amazed to see the size of the two minarets. The local guide displayed us the shaking minarets by putting a container of water on the floor and shaking the minarets right at the center. I still remember the way in which the minarets shook.
Written July 3, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Holly H
Memphis, TN122 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2014 • Solo
It's a nice idea, but you. Ant really see them shake or go inside. But seeing them still is a nice sight.
Written June 29, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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