Shenyang WWII Allied Prisoners Camp Site Museum

Shenyang WWII Allied Prisoners Camp Site Museum

Shenyang WWII Allied Prisoners Camp Site Museum

Shenyang WWII Allied Prisoners Camp Site Museum
4.5

4.5
14 reviews
Excellent
13
Very good
0
Average
0
Poor
0
Terrible
1

Josephine Seah
Bandar Seri Begawan, Brunei Darussalam444 contributions
Disappointed
Sep 2019 • Couples
We went this afternoon after visited 918 museum. Took a taxi to this museum only found out that it was closed for 3 months starting 4/9/19. We were so disappointed. Anyway, please go there within this 3 months.
Written September 13, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

roleycsl
Mississippi Gulf Coast, MS199 contributions
Informative, clear, and well done
Sep 2018 • Friends
We have lived in this area for about a month and heard that this was a great museum to visit, we were not disappointed. There is no cost.

As others have shared, this was well presented with care and professionalism.
A small museum in the middle of a hustling and bustling area.

The highlight for us was the POW wall, showing many of the former POW’s retuning to the museum in 2007-2008.

May we never forget.

Written September 23, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

ChiYuLu
Shenyang, China52 contributions
Unknown to many locals and in their home countries
Jun 2018 • Solo
As a local, I only realized the existence of such WWII prison camp in my hometown recently. Over 2000 Allied prisoners of the Pacific war were driven here by Japanese troops, after their surrender in the Philippines, stayed in Shenyang between 1942 and 1945. Over 200 died in the camp out of hunger, torture, diseases and lack of basic medical care.

A bit of historical background before your visit: the current name of the city is Shenyang, back in Republic of China era (1912-1949) the city is known as Fengtian sometimes. However, "Mukden", although frequently used by many prisoners when they recall their stay, is actually a Manchu name which is better known abroad rather inside China. Manchu is an ethnic minority originally based in Northeast China, whose royal family ruled the entire country between 1644-1911, however, this people has assimilated quite well with the nation, especially after the collapse of their dynasty.

Shenyang is the largest city in Northeast China, and it was in 1931 that Japanese troops attacked the city as the beginning of their militaristic attempt to conquer the entire country. After a few months, Japanese troops occupied the northeast region of China and established a puppet state called Manchukuo. This is why those allied POWs were sent here (Shenyang and Manchukuo are basically colony of Japan between 1931 and 1945).

The fun part of the museum, well there are indeed here, is that many prisoners although captives suffering hunger and mistreatment, remain optimistic by drawing cartoons secretly. There is an exhibition of them, you don't want to miss them! Also check my photos :)

To reach the museum, I'd suggest you take Metro and stop at Pangjiangjie station, take Exit A and it's only 5 min walk. Free to visit, no security clearance or ID required. Unfortunately, dorm rooms are not accessible by individual visitors.
Written June 23, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Lee H
Shenyang, China3 contributions
Hidden Gem in Shenyang
Jul 2016 • Friends
Before visiting, I had no idea this was here. The Chinese government built the museum a few years back. It is one of the few good examples highlighting Chinese American cooperation during WW11. The camp housed most of the senior allied officers captured by the Imperial Japanese forces. Lt General Wainwright, who stands behind General MacArthur during the surrender ceremony was interned here for 5 years. He was flown directly from this camp after being liberated, to the surrender ceremonies. It is an important piece of combined Western-Chinese history that should not be forgotten. Most prisoners housed here were US, Australian, and Dutch, although many other countries prisoners were also here.
Written June 1, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

HelmerJuulNissen
Bangkok, Thailand34 contributions
Very informative museum.
Dec 2016 • Friends
It was a very nice museum to visit, with very detailed texts and pictures to tell the story of the Japanese run prison for the local Chinese and Allied personel.
Written January 7, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Brian E
Shenyang China70 contributions
Most unusual and a reminder
Aug 2016 • Solo
Easy to get to by subway and worth a visit. I got the same feeling of rememberance with this visit as I got in Ranau in Sabah where the Sandarkan Death March has a museum. The POW's have not been totally forgotten. A reminder of what can and is still happening in parts of the world.
The POW part of the museum has English sub titles but the wartime Chinese/Western friendship section is only in Chinese - a great pity. Very few visitors and free
Written August 22, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Alex_Wempe
Shenyang, China26 contributions
9/18 Historical Site / Museum
Oct 2015 • Friends
One of the highlights in Shenyang the museum is informative and worth the trip to Dadong district. It will take about 1.5 hours to g through the museum.
Written August 6, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Pengilld
Crows Nest, Australia217 contributions
Excellent and surprising museum
May 2016 • Couples
The museum is free and is surprisingly very well presented. It's a great museum to visit after the 9/18 museum. It takes about 1-2 hours to go through the museum.

The main building has a wealth of information. There is background to the pow camp, including the start of the second world War, the Japanese policy of forced labor and the factories. There is detailed information on the prisoners, including the American surrender of 70,000 troops in the Philippines and their death March towards china.  There is a wealth of information on the prison conditions,  including wax figures, photos and many drawings made by the prisoners which show prison life.  There is also information on the prisoners themselves,  including their release and revisit years later. Almost all information is translated into English and very informative.

There is also a few buildings which reproduce the living conditions, washrooms, watch towers and the hell hole which prisoners were dropped into for solitary confinement.

There is also reference to 'unit 731' (the Japanese unit that conducted biological experiments on prisoners) which itself has a museum just outside of Harbin (which is worth visiting if you are up that way).

There is one translation into Japanese. Typical of the Chinese communist museums, it is difficult to find and inconvenient to read (outside the museum in the side street, and can only be read it you press up against the compound wall). These token niceties towards the Japanese are like a "where's wally" treasure hunt at Chinese war museums.

Easiest way to get there is to take the metro,  line 1, to the 'BangJiangJie' stop (the second last stop on the line) and take the 'A'  exit. As you exit the metro building (by the 'A'  exit) turn right and then right again, following the building around to the back of it. Then continue straight ahead down the street (taking a slight dog leg to the right).  You'll see the tall wall of a prison /compound.  Follow that wall around (keeping it on your right hand side) to the entrance. All up it takes no more than 5 minutes from the metro entrance and is about 300 metres.
Written May 17, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

OpenHorizons16
Centennial, CO15 contributions
Nicely Done Museum
Feb 2016
I was surprised to see this as an attraction. It is an older more run down part of the city sitting all by itself and not many visitors when I was there. It is a nicely done museum to an Allied Prisoner of War camp that was there throughout WWII. It housed mostly Americans, but also the other allies. Most of the Americans were survivors of the Bataan Death March. I thought they did a very nice job in good detail. I wanted to donate to the museum while I was there. I recommend it but have a taxi ready to pick you up at a set time. You might have a hard time to get out of there.
Written February 25, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

YorkHiker
Yorkshire, UK1,391 contributions
China's best preserved POW Camp
Aug 2015
This great museum is not far from the 9.18 museum. But have a detailed address as many taxi drivers don't know it.

The POW camp is free to enter and has walls, watch towers and three buildings to explore. The buildings include recreated POW bunks, wash rooms and Japanese offices. There is also a large display on Allied forces in China - the largest exhibit and admission of its kind I have seen in China. The overall message is friendship between the Allies and Chinese.

Allow one hour for visiting. I'll upload photos at a layer date.
Written August 15, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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