Baili Island

Baili Island, Zhuhai: Tickets, Tours, Hours, Address, Baili Island Reviews: 3.5/5

Baili Island
3.5
7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Monday
7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Tuesday
7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Wednesday
7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Thursday
7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Friday
7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Saturday
7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
Sunday
7:00 AM - 9:00 PM
What people are saying
Military vacation experience
Baili Island is a former Chinese naval installation. The entire island was a military base that has now been converted into a tourism destination. Baili Island is in the Pearl River Delta, between Macau and Hong Kong. It is accessible from the Xiangzhou Ferry Terminal in Zhuhai. It is a nice escape from the crowds and heat of the region. In October 2007, a travel agent in Zhuhai arranged ferry transportation and one night's accommodation on Baili Island for 210 yuan per person. The ferry ride was about one hour. The entry fee to the island was 10 yuan (I think) and is payable by all visitors. We checked into the harborfront hotel and proceeded to explore the island. The island has many interesting sights. A tunnel runs through the island and connects the harbor on the north side with a military base on the west side. A decommissioned guided missile warship guards the mouth of the tunnel on the harbor. Visitors may walk down a passageway that runs alongside the underground river. A Chinese interpretive display in the tunnel explains the history of the base and the few naval skirmishes in which its forces were involved. The base on the west side of the island features some decommissioned weaponry in working order. Visitors may sit on the anti-aircraft guns and rotate the turrets to fight off imaginary Taiwanese or American invaders. An amphibious tank and an old antiship missile are also on display. A military-style obstacle course has been built in this area. It was fun to run the course with its trenches, walls and hanging challenges. The remainder of the island contains old military buildings in various states of repair. The roads are in good shape, allowing visitors to explore the old barracks, warehouses and pillboxes throughout the island. Visitors may also hike around some of the island on a seaside trail. Mountain bikes are available for rent at the harbor office. Since the island doesn't seem have any permanent residents or private housing, the flora and fauna are relatively unchecked. Many birds are noticeable in the trees. The hotel is very close to the dock and the restaurant on the harborfront. The rooms appear to have been renovated recently. They have a nice view of the harbor with space to sit outside, enjoy the sea breeze and watch the South China Sea. The rooms are neat and clean with comfortable beds and the usual Chinese amenities (hot water for tea, slippers, toothbrushes, combs, soap, shampoo). The color TV offers mainland Chinese channels with faint Hong Kong channels coming through too. The harborfront restaurant has outdoor seating with a nice view of the harbor and sea. The island raises its own fish and chickens for the restaurant. Seafood is kept alive in tanks and diners can pick their choices for lunch or supper. Prices were very reasonable with a large seafood meal for five costing us about 320 yuan. Evening entertainment included a mahjong table for let at the hotel and a barbecue area with a karaoke system. The harborfront store also sells fireworks. The island is extremely quiet given the population of the region. I counted about 30 visitors on a Saturday. My group was totally alone in our exploration of the island. The drawback for English-speaking visitors is the lack of English infrastructure on the island. The signage and interpretive information is in Chinese only and the staff seem to speak only Mandarin or Cantonese. A phrasebook or a tour guide would be a must for non-Chinese speakers. Baili Island is an interesting place for military or nature buffs. It is extremely quiet with a cooling sea breeze so it makes a nice getaway from Hong Kong, Macau or the rest of Guangdong.

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iamface
East Sussex, UK1,337 contributions
sadly for no more military stuff in island currently
Aug 2017 • Friends
one of mystery island in zhuhai but sadly for no more military stuff in island currently that only remain 1 big tunnel which was larger & deeper than Kinmen one. baili was quite big & getting some ruin building. after reach hilltop that has beautiful view. the sea also beautiful & clean with some unused fishing field & wild duck.
expenisve cost for reach here but seem getting some camping or fishing activity sometimes. almost lost island which only 2 people & few dogs living in this island
Written August 22, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

msambors
Ottawa167 contributions
Military vacation experience
Baili Island is a former Chinese naval installation. The entire island was a military base that has now been converted into a tourism destination. Baili Island is in the Pearl River Delta, between Macau and Hong Kong. It is accessible from the Xiangzhou Ferry Terminal in Zhuhai. It is a nice escape from the crowds and heat of the region.

In October 2007, a travel agent in Zhuhai arranged ferry transportation and one night's accommodation on Baili Island for 210 yuan per person. The ferry ride was about one hour. The entry fee to the island was 10 yuan (I think) and is payable by all visitors. We checked into the harborfront hotel and proceeded to explore the island.

The island has many interesting sights. A tunnel runs through the island and connects the harbor on the north side with a military base on the west side. A decommissioned guided missile warship guards the mouth of the tunnel on the harbor. Visitors may walk down a passageway that runs alongside the underground river. A Chinese interpretive display in the tunnel explains the history of the base and the few naval skirmishes in which its forces were involved.

The base on the west side of the island features some decommissioned weaponry in working order. Visitors may sit on the anti-aircraft guns and rotate the turrets to fight off imaginary Taiwanese or American invaders. An amphibious tank and an old antiship missile are also on display.

A military-style obstacle course has been built in this area. It was fun to run the course with its trenches, walls and hanging challenges.

The remainder of the island contains old military buildings in various states of repair. The roads are in good shape, allowing visitors to explore the old barracks, warehouses and pillboxes throughout the island. Visitors may also hike around some of the island on a seaside trail. Mountain bikes are available for rent at the harbor office.

Since the island doesn't seem have any permanent residents or private housing, the flora and fauna are relatively unchecked. Many birds are noticeable in the trees.

The hotel is very close to the dock and the restaurant on the harborfront. The rooms appear to have been renovated recently. They have a nice view of the harbor with space to sit outside, enjoy the sea breeze and watch the South China Sea. The rooms are neat and clean with comfortable beds and the usual Chinese amenities (hot water for tea, slippers, toothbrushes, combs, soap, shampoo). The color TV offers mainland Chinese channels with faint Hong Kong channels coming through too.

The harborfront restaurant has outdoor seating with a nice view of the harbor and sea. The island raises its own fish and chickens for the restaurant. Seafood is kept alive in tanks and diners can pick their choices for lunch or supper. Prices were very reasonable with a large seafood meal for five costing us about 320 yuan.

Evening entertainment included a mahjong table for let at the hotel and a barbecue area with a karaoke system. The harborfront store also sells fireworks.

The island is extremely quiet given the population of the region. I counted about 30 visitors on a Saturday. My group was totally alone in our exploration of the island. The drawback for English-speaking visitors is the lack of English infrastructure on the island. The signage and interpretive information is in Chinese only and the staff seem to speak only Mandarin or Cantonese. A phrasebook or a tour guide would be a must for non-Chinese speakers.

Baili Island is an interesting place for military or nature buffs. It is extremely quiet with a cooling sea breeze so it makes a nice getaway from Hong Kong, Macau or the rest of Guangdong.
Written October 28, 2007
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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