Dongjiang Column Memorial

Dongjiang Column Memorial, Shenzhen

Dongjiang Column Memorial
2.5
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
What people are saying
JonasCN
By JonasCN
Worth a visit if you like Chinese history and can read Chinese
Jun 2017
I love modern Chinese history, especially the 21st century. This museum celebrates the heroes in Dongjiang who fought against the Japanese and helped the Americans during World War Two. The same heroes helped the communist government to defeat the tyrannical nationalist government in China in 1949. The museum is pretty remote and deserted. You don't find many people walking and only see some random shophouses along uneven roads. The area is not developed and felt like China in the 1990s. It is open from 9am to 4.30pm. But there is a catch. It is closed from 12pm to 2pm due to lunch (reason cause I came at 12.50pm and they refused to let me go in as its lunch hour. There is also one weekday that is closed (I think its Monday or Tuesday). The visit was a blast from the past. It is free and I was made to sign on an attendance with faded pen. The guards did not bother to check my documents too. I was the only visitor on that Wednesday afternoon at 2pm (meaning there was no visitor throughout the day). I glanced through visitor log for past few days and there is barely more than a few visitors a day. The journey starts with two small houses that was owned by Chen Shen, one revolutionary who left a wealthy family to grind it out with the communist party and publish many propaganda news articles for them. The house is motion sensored, i.e. Chinese narration will play the moment it sense your entry. The highlight is a sofa ex leader Hu Jintao sat with him in 1982. It is surreal and quite interesting. But there is almost non existent English descriptors and your command of Chinese have to be good to understand the text. After you finish the two houses, you will be greeted with the main building which is a memorial. Many World War Two and civil war artefacts are kept with descriptors on what they are in Chinese. Some of the items are replicas. You can sense they are cause they look new. One highlight is a certificate from North Korea crediting China for their help in the Korean War. The staff just ignores you and they station themselves at the book display store next to the entrance. They sell books that appears left in the shelf for years (due to the yellowish tint in some of the covers). The staff cannot speak English too. The air con is on but it felt hot so I am not sure what was the temperature they set. To exacerbate their nonchalance, you have to switch on the lights along corridors and the rooms if you will like to visit level 2. In fact, locating the lights when walking in the dark is a challenge. The staff just ignores you. Level 2 displays some wartime furniture, clothes and write up about the war heroes. I suspect the staff have not clean level 2 for a long time as its really dusty (not recommended for visitors with asthma). There is a nice theatre that looks like a commune gathering house (except there is no video to watch). There is an artillery gun and toilet outside the building. The toilet is visually clean but is the squat old type with some stench. Overall I enjoyed the visit as I love history and can understand the Chinese language. But I can't give it a high score because of the poor service, maintenance and travel time from city area just to visit a museum that you can complete within a hour. The travel time is probably longer than the visit. Recommended for students of Chinese history only.

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2.5
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JonasCN
Singapore, Singapore4,051 contributions
Worth a visit if you like Chinese history and can read Chinese
Jun 2017 • Solo
I love modern Chinese history, especially the 21st century. This museum celebrates the heroes in Dongjiang who fought against the Japanese and helped the Americans during World War Two. The same heroes helped the communist government to defeat the tyrannical nationalist government in China in 1949. The museum is pretty remote and deserted. You don't find many people walking and only see some random shophouses along uneven roads. The area is not developed and felt like China in the 1990s. It is open from 9am to 4.30pm. But there is a catch. It is closed from 12pm to 2pm due to lunch (reason cause I came at 12.50pm and they refused to let me go in as its lunch hour. There is also one weekday that is closed (I think its Monday or Tuesday).

The visit was a blast from the past. It is free and I was made to sign on an attendance with faded pen. The guards did not bother to check my documents too. I was the only visitor on that Wednesday afternoon at 2pm (meaning there was no visitor throughout the day). I glanced through visitor log for past few days and there is barely more than a few visitors a day.

The journey starts with two small houses that was owned by Chen Shen, one revolutionary who left a wealthy family to grind it out with the communist party and publish many propaganda news articles for them. The house is motion sensored, i.e. Chinese narration will play the moment it sense your entry. The highlight is a sofa ex leader Hu Jintao sat with him in 1982. It is surreal and quite interesting. But there is almost non existent English descriptors and your command of Chinese have to be good to understand the text.

After you finish the two houses, you will be greeted with the main building which is a memorial. Many World War Two and civil war artefacts are kept with descriptors on what they are in Chinese. Some of the items are replicas. You can sense they are cause they look new. One highlight is a certificate from North Korea crediting China for their help in the Korean War. The staff just ignores you and they station themselves at the book display store next to the entrance. They sell books that appears left in the shelf for years (due to the yellowish tint in some of the covers). The staff cannot speak English too. The air con is on but it felt hot so I am not sure what was the temperature they set. To exacerbate their nonchalance, you have to switch on the lights along corridors and the rooms if you will like to visit level 2. In fact, locating the lights when walking in the dark is a challenge. The staff just ignores you. Level 2 displays some wartime furniture, clothes and write up about the war heroes. I suspect the staff have not clean level 2 for a long time as its really dusty (not recommended for visitors with asthma). There is a nice theatre that looks like a commune gathering house (except there is no video to watch).

There is an artillery gun and toilet outside the building. The toilet is visually clean but is the squat old type with some stench.

Overall I enjoyed the visit as I love history and can understand the Chinese language. But I can't give it a high score because of the poor service, maintenance and travel time from city area just to visit a museum that you can complete within a hour. The travel time is probably longer than the visit. Recommended for students of Chinese history only.
Written June 16, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Frequently Asked Questions about Dongjiang Column Memorial

Dongjiang Column Memorial is open:
  • Sun - Sat 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM