Humen Naval Museum
Humen Naval Museum
4
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
7:00 AM - 5:00 PM
What people are saying
Must-see for history fans
5.0 of 5 bubblesMay 2021
This is an excellent museum that largely focuses on the Opium Wars fought between Britain and China, while also placing the battles in a detailed historical context in the 18th and 19th centuries by giving mostly-accurate accounts of Chinese, European, and American society of the period. Be sure to follow the exhibition’s sections in the prescribed order, which will take you 2 to 3 hours. I travelled to the museum from Guangzhou by DiDi, which took just over an hour and cost 150 yuan (then the same again back). The museum itself sells no food or drink, but when I went in May 2021 there were some small shops open south-east of the museum grounds where I bought some water. In front of the museum there’s an impressive view of the Humen Bridge, and around the corner on the waterfront is the Weiyuan Fort. The museum’s displays and dioramas are superb. There are many enormous paintings depicting the Chinese defending their homeland against the British invaders, which honestly left me awestruck, as well as meticulous breakdowns of each side’s military equipment. Descriptions are in Chinese and English, with the English translations of decent quality. The massive sculpture in the atrium is a sight to behold as well, especially when viewed from the balcony above. As an Englishman myself, I was braced for some incensed lashes at British imperialism, but that mostly never came. For the most part, the museum gives a strikingly objective account of what went on between Britain and China in the 19th century. The truth really speaks for itself in this matter. I was surprised not just by the level of detail, but also by the candid analysis of the Qing dynasty’s failure to either prepare for or repel foreign invasion. Throughout the museum there’s a palpable respect for Western technological development, side-by-side with frank critiques of the Qing dynasty’s “lagging behind” the West (as the museum’s own narrative frequently terms it). The shameful actions of British and French forces in China are also recounted with unflinching detail. There’s very little whitewashing or revisionism here – the museum uncompromisingly presents the Qing leadership as having failed the Chinese people, and British military might as easily overpowering China (for the abhorrent sake of forcing China to import opium). It’s very insightful into how historical events have shaped the Chinese psyche and the Chinese government of today. At the end of the exhibition there’s a dark room with a summarising passage written on the wall, which is arguably the only point where the museum's narrative explicitly editorialises. But after the awful and utterly humiliating events that you just spent hours learning about in stark detail, you understand where it’s coming from. Overall, this museum took my breath away and I sincerely wish the events that it records were taught to British children as they certainly are to Chinese children. Given what is likely to come in the 21st century, knowledge of the past is more important than it has ever been, and this museum exemplifies that.
Douglas M
By Douglas M
Still Excellent
5.0 of 5 bubblesJul 2020
Before visiting this museum, we had visited WeiYuan Fort which is a short walk away in the same park. How SWMBO and I got to and into the park is in that review. Suffice to say that hopefully the travel and the park entrance procedures will simplify, especially for foreigners, over the next few months. There’s so much to see in this museum. It’s not just about naval battles, it’s a rather detailed history of military and social affairs from the late 1700’s to the beginning of the PRC in 1949. Then add in displays about the English Civil War (labelled as The British Bourgeois Revolution), the English monarchy, The French Revolution, The Industrial Revolution, scientific developments, navigation developments. Now add displays about nearly every battle in and around Humen with maps, of course there’s mention of the Opium Wars. Then add in the effects of the French, Russian, Americans, Japanese in China and especially the British. Even the transportation of convicts to Australia is there to show how nasty we Brits were. I mustn’t forget the failings of the Qing’s are also given a good airing. Lots of photographs, paintings, memorabilia and ephemera to keep your interest. All signage is in both Chinese and English. There’s a nice gift shop but unfortunately nothing specific to the Naval Museum or WeiYuan Fort just the usual tourist trinkets which was rather a pity. There’s no café in the museum and toilets are outside. There are places to sit and rest weary legs. I’d say at least two hours for a quick gander at the museum, or half-a-day if you’re a history buff but by then you’ll be overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of information presented. Even on my second visit I saw exhibits that I’d overlooked the first time. A visit will certainly give you some understanding of how many Chinese view their history and the present world. At 5 o’clock we took our leave and wandered out of the park. A leisurely stroll along the promenade to see the ships anchored in the distance waiting to unload at NanSha port. Then we jumped on the No. 238 bus and after a 30-minute journey were at the HuMen Bus Station. We had to wait another hour to get the 7 o’clock and last coach back to GuangZhou which took another hour and a quarter, and then a taxi home. The lady who was ushering us onto the coach to GuangZhou reckoned that this coach service will be axed by the end of the year as there’s just not enough passengers to justify a service. A couple of years ago there were four or five coaches a day both ways, now it’s just two. Next time I think we’ll take a train to DongGuan Railway Station, then the Donguan Rail Transit all the way to the Humen Railway Station, and then a No. 229 bus to the park. Alternatively get off at HuMen GaoTie station and get the No. 212 bus. Now that’s another journey to look forward to!

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles20 reviews
Excellent
7
Very good
10
Average
3
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0

Douglas M
Guangzhou, China2,729 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2020
Before visiting this museum, we had visited WeiYuan Fort which is a short walk away in the same park. How SWMBO and I got to and into the park is in that review.
Suffice to say that hopefully the travel and the park entrance procedures will simplify, especially for foreigners, over the next few months.

There’s so much to see in this museum. It’s not just about naval battles, it’s a rather detailed history of military and social affairs from the late 1700’s to the beginning of the PRC in 1949. Then add in displays about the English Civil War (labelled as The British Bourgeois Revolution), the English monarchy, The French Revolution, The Industrial Revolution, scientific developments, navigation developments. Now add displays about nearly every battle in and around Humen with maps, of course there’s mention of the Opium Wars. Then add in the effects of the French, Russian, Americans, Japanese in China and especially the British. Even the transportation of convicts to Australia is there to show how nasty we Brits were. I mustn’t forget the failings of the Qing’s are also given a good airing. Lots of photographs, paintings, memorabilia and ephemera to keep your interest. All signage is in both Chinese and English.

There’s a nice gift shop but unfortunately nothing specific to the Naval Museum or WeiYuan Fort just the usual tourist trinkets which was rather a pity.

There’s no café in the museum and toilets are outside. There are places to sit and rest weary legs. I’d say at least two hours for a quick gander at the museum, or half-a-day if you’re a history buff but by then you’ll be overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of information presented. Even on my second visit I saw exhibits that I’d overlooked the first time.

A visit will certainly give you some understanding of how many Chinese view their history and the present world.

At 5 o’clock we took our leave and wandered out of the park. A leisurely stroll along the promenade to see the ships anchored in the distance waiting to unload at NanSha port. Then we jumped on the No. 238 bus and after a 30-minute journey were at the HuMen Bus Station.

We had to wait another hour to get the 7 o’clock and last coach back to GuangZhou which took another hour and a quarter, and then a taxi home.
The lady who was ushering us onto the coach to GuangZhou reckoned that this coach service will be axed by the end of the year as there’s just not enough passengers to justify a service. A couple of years ago there were four or five coaches a day both ways, now it’s just two.

Next time I think we’ll take a train to DongGuan Railway Station, then the Donguan Rail Transit all the way to the Humen Railway Station, and then a No. 229 bus to the park. Alternatively get off at HuMen GaoTie station and get the No. 212 bus. Now that’s another journey to look forward to!
Written July 2, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

inspire8
Los Angeles, CA52 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2015 • Solo
The entrance to the museum is FREE!!! and the grounds are beautifully maintained. I'm surprised that there's no crowd in August 2015. There's a lot to learn .... Guangdong history, Opium War, Hongkong takeover by the British, etc. You'll find English captions on most items. You can also see the famous Humen Bridge & The Fort outside the museum.
Written September 10, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

hopingfortravel
Wollongong, Australia160 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2013 • Couples
Excellent!! See other review of opium museum, as they are now together .... I wish more high school "kids" could visit these. ....
Written January 27, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kylie M
Victoria68 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2018 • Business
This musuem has changed and improved from when I first went a few years back. Interesting relics and a good accompanment for the Lin Zexu Musuem and War Fort vist.

Very easy to navigate.
Written September 10, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Arnold Chn
San Francisco, CA67 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2018 • Friends
The museum depicts a great historical perspective concerning the nautical history of Dongguan. A lesser known maritime history than Guangzhou but pivotal in Defense of the Pearl River Delta.
Written July 15, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Edgar S
Hong Kong, China1,561 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2017 • Couples
The museum is full of wonderful surprises. The exhibition halls (many of them) are so well and professionally executed, that one forgets the time spent. The place does not only shows the Opium Wars between the British and the Chinese but includes many other evolutions and changes since the wars. Well described in details both in Chinese and English and not to mention all the interaction halls, where one travels back in time, to see 3D shows and feel in person how it was in the past. A really awesome place to be. Take at least 2 or more hours to visit the museum but you won't be disappointed at all. The museum and park feature too, the place where the Chinese burned the opium taken from the British and a real fortress where the Chinese cannons stood against their invaders coming in from the Pearl River delta. Do visit, you won't be disappointed.
Written September 22, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

requedieu
Paris, France194 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Solo
do visit. The exhibits are generally interesting and reasonably presented. Do be aware the information presented therein is from a Chinese historical viewpoint which is neither precise nor historically accurate. This said, it is their museum and one of the better ones in the Province.
Written June 18, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

soenghei
Zipaquira, Colombia87 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2016 • Solo
Unfortunately now (Jan 1, 2016) closed for renovation. No information on reopening. However the other attractions at this location are still open and certainly worth visiting
Written January 3, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Elygalaxy
Germany61 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2011 • Business
Although some of the detail on the written cards around the museum is not always up to scratch, you can't fault this museum. Being a Brit, walking around a museum showing what we did to the area is an eye opener.
Written January 16, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Steve B
2 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2021
This is an excellent museum that largely focuses on the Opium Wars fought between Britain and China, while also placing the battles in a detailed historical context in the 18th and 19th centuries by giving mostly-accurate accounts of Chinese, European, and American society of the period. Be sure to follow the exhibition’s sections in the prescribed order, which will take you 2 to 3 hours.

I travelled to the museum from Guangzhou by DiDi, which took just over an hour and cost 150 yuan (then the same again back). The museum itself sells no food or drink, but when I went in May 2021 there were some small shops open south-east of the museum grounds where I bought some water. In front of the museum there’s an impressive view of the Humen Bridge, and around the corner on the waterfront is the Weiyuan Fort.

The museum’s displays and dioramas are superb. There are many enormous paintings depicting the Chinese defending their homeland against the British invaders, which honestly left me awestruck, as well as meticulous breakdowns of each side’s military equipment. Descriptions are in Chinese and English, with the English translations of decent quality. The massive sculpture in the atrium is a sight to behold as well, especially when viewed from the balcony above.

As an Englishman myself, I was braced for some incensed lashes at British imperialism, but that mostly never came. For the most part, the museum gives a strikingly objective account of what went on between Britain and China in the 19th century. The truth really speaks for itself in this matter.

I was surprised not just by the level of detail, but also by the candid analysis of the Qing dynasty’s failure to either prepare for or repel foreign invasion. Throughout the museum there’s a palpable respect for Western technological development, side-by-side with frank critiques of the Qing dynasty’s “lagging behind” the West (as the museum’s own narrative frequently terms it). The shameful actions of British and French forces in China are also recounted with unflinching detail. There’s very little whitewashing or revisionism here – the museum uncompromisingly presents the Qing leadership as having failed the Chinese people, and British military might as easily overpowering China (for the abhorrent sake of forcing China to import opium). It’s very insightful into how historical events have shaped the Chinese psyche and the Chinese government of today.

At the end of the exhibition there’s a dark room with a summarising passage written on the wall, which is arguably the only point where the museum's narrative explicitly editorialises. But after the awful and utterly humiliating events that you just spent hours learning about in stark detail, you understand where it’s coming from.

Overall, this museum took my breath away and I sincerely wish the events that it records were taught to British children as they certainly are to Chinese children. Given what is likely to come in the 21st century, knowledge of the past is more important than it has ever been, and this museum exemplifies that.
Written December 28, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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