Qorikancha
Historic SitesAncient RuinsReligious Sites
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Monday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Sunday
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
About
This ruin was once the most important temple of the Incas, which was later used as a base for the Church of Santo Domingo when the Spanish conquered the city.
Duration: 2-3 hours
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  • DodoDidi
    Tampa, Florida926 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Totally impressed with Incan builders!
    The was an original incan palace. The Temple of the Sun has remained, as has examples on incan stone work. You are able to see how these huge stones were joined, as well as the Cuzqueñan school of art work. Worth a visit to the outskirts of the original colonial downtown.
    Visited May 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written May 4, 2023
  • David M
    St. Albans, United Kingdom5 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Fascinating site
    This site is a really interesting mix of Spanish and Inca architecture and a must-see in Cusco. I didn't take a guided tour and sadly the information is pretty lacking if you don't. There is a little pamphlet with some info that you can request and QR codes that lead to scanned documents on a Facebook page, which I found pretty tricky to access (when I could even get the code to be recognised on my phone), as I font have a FB account. It seems it's not possible to join a tour once they've entered the site, so I would recommend booking in advance or approaching a tour guide with a red lanyard who hang around outside. However I think I saw more of the site than those who had a guide, as they didn't seem to visit the upper levels at all, which are all Spanish/Catholic history but include the stunning choir with a view over the church, and the bell tower with views over Cusco (which costs 5 soles extra). The conventional wisdom with these sites is to visit early to avoid the rush, but it is absolutely heaving at opening time (9am). You can barely move for the massive tour groups, let alone get decent photos. I strongly recommend visiting after about 11am as it was pretty empty by then and much more peaceful.
    Visited September 2023
    Traveled solo
    Written September 9, 2023
  • TheExplorerFamily
    Somerset, New Jersey6,451 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    An Amazingly Knowledgeable Visit
    This was the most important Temple in the Inca Empire, and was built in 1438 at the meeting place of two large rivers. The complex is huge and one area contained the Temple of the Sun that was dedicated to the three biggest Gods in the Inca Pantheon – the Creator God Viracocha, the Moon Goddess Quilla and the Sun God Inti. Once upon a time, the place was filled with a lot of gold everywhere, but after taking Cusco, the Spaniards looted almost all the wealth, melted it all down and took it to Spain. They destroyed the place, and in 1534 built the Christian Monastery of Santo Domingo over the complex to signify the replacement of one religion with another. Little remains today except for the original foundation walls and lots of legendary stories. Those massive foundation walls that the Inca constructed were built from very large stones finely cut and fitted together without any mortar – a big feat of architecture. Another feature of the Inca builders was that the walls lean inwards, and were built to withstand earthquakes and sinking. The Spanish could not destroy these walls, so they just built over those solid foundations. The Incas were also known for their detailed astronomical observations. A few rooms are dedicated to this. Their knowledge of The Milky Way and other Constellations was incredible. Lots of proof of this is presented in some of those rooms. The Gardens of the complex are also beautiful, and were meant to pay homage to Inti. They are still immaculately maintained. One area has the three symbols of the Inca – The Puma, the Condor and the Snake – carved out in the grass. We had an amazing guided tour, and learned a tremendous amount about the Inca life, and their advance knowledge about architecture and astronomy. Recommend taking a guided tour to understand what you are looking at. A “Must Visit”.
    Visited September 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written September 21, 2023
  • lisajlb
    Westhoughton, United Kingdom1,301 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Glad I had a guide
    This was part of a half.day tour of Cusco. I wish we had longer, but the guide we had explained about the discovery of the what are now the gardens following an earthquake in 1986. It was great to see the original INKA walls and were told that in future years they may be covered with glass to protect. The architecture and math used to build this without the technology we have.is impressive. Well worth a visit
    Visited October 2023
    Traveled solo
    Written October 26, 2023
  • E Curb N
    Monkey Mia, Australia60 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    La Conquista’s fractured legacy
    The pre-Columbian Qorikancha site was conveniently just around the corner from my Cusco accommodation at the Unaytambo. What remains of the Incas’ “Temple of the Sun” however are only fragments and ruins of the original structure, thanks to the Spanish conquerors who built their Santo Domingo Cathedral on top of it! The guide pointed out the most interesting feature of the original temple’s surviving stonework, the Inca architects had built the doorways and windows in such a way to create a perfect trapezoid form.
    Visited July 2023
    Traveled solo
    Written November 18, 2023
  • sttly
    Fort Lauderdale, Florida132 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Very interesting
    This was a very interesting site. The Spanish buildings were built on a native buildings which are now exposed and there is information about how they were built. Of all the sites we saw this was the only one that explained/showed this. Admission is 15 soles, less than $4 when we were there and is well worth that.
    Visited February 2024
    Traveled with friends
    Written March 15, 2024
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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Noah L
Austin, TX51 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
This is a great place to visit if you want to learn more about the Incan people and the Inca Empire. This place was a Temple of the Sun and was an important religious center during the Inca Empire. The stonework of the ruins here is absolutely amazing, much better than the stonework seen at Sacsayhuaman and other ruins near Cusco. Almost all of the signs have both English and Spanish on them, but you can pay an extra 1 sol to get the guide app which has extra information not written on the signs and also has more languages. Overall very cool and informative museum.
Written January 11, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

FEY SHAYON PACE
Sweden4 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2020
This site is open, admission has a price of 15 soles, although the entire route cannot be done because of the covid. You can do the tour on your own or pay a guide, which costs around 25-35 soles. Group area allowed up to 8 people, you must maintain social distancing and masks, here you can have an idea of the majesty of the Inca architecture, with its fine polishes used for the construction of its temples.
Written January 11, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

deborahk3
Maidstone, UK1,806 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019
This stunning temple is situated in the heart of historic Cusco. It was one of the most sacred and important temples of the Inca empire. When the Spanish arrived in Cusco they destroyed most of Coricancha and the Santo Domingo Church was built on the foundations and what remained of the walls; unfortunately only a small part of this temple has been preserved.
The walls of the temple are made from indigenous rocks, giving the structure the perfect finish as expected by the Inca architecture. This has allowed the foundations and subsequent structures have stood the test of time as well as a number of major earthquakes in the Cusco area. You really cant miss Coricancha in Cusco, it offers amazing architecture as well as numerous historical treasures.
Written April 15, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Arcee_CO
Wheat Ridge, CO1,106 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020 • Couples
This archeological site is in the center of the city, as an underground museum and the extensive foundation of the 16th century Santo Domingo church. Exhibits provide some context and comparisons of Inka and Spanish beliefs and practices, along with illustrative artifacts. One exhibit details the Inka surgical procedures on the brain, noting a 65 % survival rate. Note that some exhibits have Spanish only explanations; a third have English translations. Others noted a translation App, which we did not use. Admission ticket is included in the handy Turistico Ticket Del Cusco covering 16 sites.
Written February 4, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nigel P
Greater London, UK17 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
I visited Qorikancha for the secomd time while visiting Cusco. This was the holiest Inca temple in Cusco with walls plated in gold and golden animals in its courtyard. The Spanish stripped the gold off and built the Convent of Santo Domingo on top of its ruins. It still remains magnificent - unlike Sacsayhuaman, the walls of QoriKancha were built from ashlar cubes without mortar and and were formed to withstand seismic shocks - Santo Domingo has been damaged several times by earthquakes but the walls of the temple remain undamaged. Many of the temple rooms remain with their trapezoid windos inside Santo Domingo and there is also a garden outside with designs inspired by the Inca era, together with a small underground museum. The convent has an exhibition of religious paintings by the Cusqueña School and contemporary artwork. Well worth the visit!!
Written January 14, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Skaramoosh
Edmonton, Canada3,970 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
Qorikancha museum gives insight and history to the ancestors who lived in these lands. The museum also houses pre-Inca, Inca and Colonial pieces.

Exhibits from the periods and replicas from objects found gives a chronological view of how Cusco's early civilization evolved and the history is explained as you walk through the five chambers or rooms.

A must for history buffs.

Highly Recommended!
Written April 5, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David M
St. Albans, UK5 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2023 • Solo
This site is a really interesting mix of Spanish and Inca architecture and a must-see in Cusco.

I didn't take a guided tour and sadly the information is pretty lacking if you don't. There is a little pamphlet with some info that you can request and QR codes that lead to scanned documents on a Facebook page, which I found pretty tricky to access (when I could even get the code to be recognised on my phone), as I font have a FB account. It seems it's not possible to join a tour once they've entered the site, so I would recommend booking in advance or approaching a tour guide with a red lanyard who hang around outside.

However I think I saw more of the site than those who had a guide, as they didn't seem to visit the upper levels at all, which are all Spanish/Catholic history but include the stunning choir with a view over the church, and the bell tower with views over Cusco (which costs 5 soles extra).

The conventional wisdom with these sites is to visit early to avoid the rush, but it is absolutely heaving at opening time (9am). You can barely move for the massive tour groups, let alone get decent photos. I strongly recommend visiting after about 11am as it was pretty empty by then and much more peaceful.
Written September 9, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TheExplorerFamily
Somerset, NJ6,451 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2023 • Family
This was the most important Temple in the Inca Empire, and was built in 1438 at the meeting place of two large rivers. The complex is huge and one area contained the Temple of the Sun that was dedicated to the three biggest Gods in the Inca Pantheon – the Creator God Viracocha, the Moon Goddess Quilla and the Sun God Inti.

Once upon a time, the place was filled with a lot of gold everywhere, but after taking Cusco, the Spaniards looted almost all the wealth, melted it all down and took it to Spain. They destroyed the place, and in 1534 built the Christian Monastery of Santo Domingo over the complex to signify the replacement of one religion with another.

Little remains today except for the original foundation walls and lots of legendary stories. Those massive foundation walls that the Inca constructed were built from very large stones finely cut and fitted together without any mortar – a big feat of architecture. Another feature of the Inca builders was that the walls lean inwards, and were built to withstand earthquakes and sinking. The Spanish could not destroy these walls, so they just built over those solid foundations.

The Incas were also known for their detailed astronomical observations. A few rooms are dedicated to this. Their knowledge of The Milky Way and other Constellations was incredible. Lots of proof of this is presented in some of those rooms.

The Gardens of the complex are also beautiful, and were meant to pay homage to Inti. They are still immaculately maintained. One area has the three symbols of the Inca – The Puma, the Condor and the Snake – carved out in the grass.

We had an amazing guided tour, and learned a tremendous amount about the Inca life, and their advance knowledge about architecture and astronomy.

Recommend taking a guided tour to understand what you are looking at. A “Must Visit”.
Written September 21, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sam R
Asheville, NC63 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
This Inca ruins turned Dominican convent was a very interesting place to spend a leisure day in Cusco. We 'toured' ourselves without the aid of audio (1 Sol at the front) and got our money's worth (15 Soles a ticket). The grounds and gardens are pristine and beautiful to walk throughout. We spent a lazy two and a half hours meandering through the convent, looking at the art, and the gardens.
Written January 29, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rhonda W
97 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2020
This site has examples of the precision engineering that the Incas are famous for. It seems to have been a site for religious purposes, but when the Spanish arrived they took it over and used it for their own purposes which explains the inner courtyard colonnade. Interesting site as a starting point in Cusco before you go on to the major sites nearby leading up to Machu Picchu. Best to go with a guide who can explain the central importance of the site to the Incas.

In the heart of the historical area of Cusco, the site is surrounded by hotels, restaurants and small shops. There is also a sweeping view across the city to the nearby mountains.
Written March 26, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Qorikancha, Cusco

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