Monument of Alliance Between Tang Dynasty and Tibetan Regime

Monument of Alliance Between Tang Dynasty and Tibetan Regime, Lhasa: Address, Phone Number, Monument of Alliance Between Tang Dynasty and Tibetan Regime Reviews: 4.5/5

Monument of Alliance Between Tang Dynasty and Tibetan Regime

Monument of Alliance Between Tang Dynasty and Tibetan Regime
4.5
What people are saying
maitreyaaugusta
By maitreyaaugusta
The Tibetan Monument is Intact-The Chinese Version does not have its original capstone. Why?
Apr 2016
A stone monument dating to 823 and setting out the terms of peace and borders between Tibet and China arrived at in 821 can still be seen in front of the Jokhang temple in Barkhor Square in Lhasa. The monument, a treaty of friendship, is written in both Tibetan and Chinese. The inscribed pillar was erected by the Chinese in 1793 during a smallpox epidemic. It records the Sino-Tibetan treaty of 822 concluded by King Ralpacan and includes the following inscription: "Tibet and China shall abide by the frontiers of which they are now in occupation. All to the east is the country of Great China; and all to the west is, without question, the country of Great Tibet. Henceforth on neither side shall there be waging of war nor seizing of territory. If any person incurs suspicion he shall be arrested; his business shall be inquired into and he shall be escorted back." The inscription also carried advice on hygiene measures to prevent smallpox.[7] The relations between the two countries appears to have been complex. On the one hand, the monument describes connections between China and Tibet as similar to those between uncle and nephew. The Tang dynasty of China and the Yarlung dynasty of Tibet were indeed related by marriage, yet the terms uncle and nephew are not used in relation to other groups with whom the Chinese had connections by marriage. On the other hand, the monument seems to describe the two countries as equals. The text has been published several times.[8][9][10]

Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing

4.5
6 reviews
Excellent
3
Very good
2
Average
1
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Christopher P
Athens, Greece142 contributions
Jul 2017
"The great king of Tibet, the Divine Manifestation, the b Tsan-po and the great king of China, the Chinese ruler Hwang Te, Nephew and Uncle, having consulted about the alliance of their dominions have made a great treaty and ratified the agreement. In order that it may never be changed, so that it may be celebrated in every age and every generation the terms of the agreement have been inscribed on a stone pillar."
It's worth mentioning there are several such stone slabs outside Buddhist monasteries around Lhasa.
Written July 11, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

maitreyaaugusta
Augusta, Australia128 contributions
Apr 2016
A stone monument dating to 823 and setting out the terms of peace and borders between Tibet and China arrived at in 821 can still be seen in front of the Jokhang temple in Barkhor Square in Lhasa. The monument, a treaty of friendship, is written in both Tibetan and Chinese. The inscribed pillar was erected by the Chinese in 1793 during a smallpox epidemic. It records the Sino-Tibetan treaty of 822 concluded by King Ralpacan and includes the following inscription: "Tibet and China shall abide by the frontiers of which they are now in occupation. All to the east is the country of Great China; and all to the west is, without question, the country of Great Tibet. Henceforth on neither side shall there be waging of war nor seizing of territory. If any person incurs suspicion he shall be arrested; his business shall be inquired into and he shall be escorted back." The inscription also carried advice on hygiene measures to prevent smallpox.[7]

The relations between the two countries appears to have been complex. On the one hand, the monument describes connections between China and Tibet as similar to those between uncle and nephew. The Tang dynasty of China and the Yarlung dynasty of Tibet were indeed related by marriage, yet the terms uncle and nephew are not used in relation to other groups with whom the Chinese had connections by marriage. On the other hand, the monument seems to describe the two countries as equals. The text has been published several times.[8][9][10]
Written April 23, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Frequently Asked Questions about Monument of Alliance Between Tang Dynasty and Tibetan Regime

Hotels near Monument of Alliance Between Tang Dynasty and Tibetan Regime: View all hotels near Monument of Alliance Between Tang Dynasty and Tibetan Regime on Tripadvisor