Museum of the?Tunnel?Warfare?of Jiaozhuanghu

Museum of the?Tunnel?Warfare?of Jiaozhuanghu, Beijing: Hours, Address, Museum of the?Tunnel?Warfare?of Jiaozhuanghu Reviews: 4/5

Museum of the?Tunnel?Warfare?of Jiaozhuanghu

Museum of the?Tunnel?Warfare?of Jiaozhuanghu
4
8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Monday
8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Friday
8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday
8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
Sunday
8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
What people are saying
Andrew M
By Andrew M
Interesting day trip from the airport
Aug 2018
My son and I stayed in an airport hotel in Beijing, and planned this visit as we had an early afternoon flight and wanted to avoid the traffic in the center of the city. The tunnel museum is a little over 30 km from the airport, in a north easterly direction. We took bus 3, from Terminal 2, which has a terminus outside of exit # 1 at the Peking Airport. The bus runs every half hour and costs 3 yuan. We exited the bus at the International Exhibition Center, which was approximately 10 minutes from the Airport. You will see the tall Crowne Plaza Hotel on your left before the bus makes this right turn onto G111 road, and the next bus stop is where you disembark. The subway station is located opposite the bus stop. Wait for a few minutes at thsi bus stop, and take Bus 31, which runs every half hour to the tunnel site. This trip will take 35-40 minutes, and the terminus of Bus 31, is just past the tunnel museum.The cost of the trip is 6 yuan. When the bus stops, the museum is a 5 minute walk back in the direction from which the bus came. I would advise that you walk through the parking lot, which has great reliefs on the walls depicting the struggle against the Japanese troops. Many local vendors selling fruit, nuts and souvenirs are in this area . Entrance is free, but passports are required to be shown, so that you can receive two tickets. The museum is comprised of two sections; museum exhibits and the tunnels. The white ticket will be taken from you at the museum, and the red tickets grants access to the tunnels which are to the rear of the museum, after crossing the street. In front of the museum, there is a sculpture of local fighters exiting a tunnel, and there are white marble reliefs on the exterior walls. The displays in the museum mainly relate to the items of daily life, how the tunnels were constructed and used, and home made weapons used by the fighters.There were a few photos of atrocities carried out by the Japanese on local people, and some famous WW2 photos e.g, surrender of Japan, raising the Soviet flag on the Reich Chancellery in Berlin More souvenir vendors are found at the exit of the museum. A short walk over a bridge leads to the entrance to the tunnels, which is just to the left of a fighter jet monument. The tour of the tunnels can be self guided, as most of the signs had english translations, and the "side" tunnels had been blocked with barriers. It is cool in the tunnels, and at some places the ceiling was very low. There were no warning signs to indicate that the roof was low in places, so proceed with caution. All tunnels are damp, so there are a few slippery areas.There are numerous small cavities in the walls where fighters could hide, and the tunnels had drainage areas and wells for drinking water. Meeting rooms were also done, where 10 persons could gather, and the side passages led to pigstys, hollowed tree trunks and a donkey stable where the tunnel complex ends. Although you have been walking in the tunnels for at least 15 minutes, the end of the tunnels is actually just behind where you originally entered. If you have 6 hours available in Beijing and want to avoid the busy city, this will be an enjoyable experience, particularly if you have young children who will have lots of fun in the tunnels.The wait for the buses may be slightly long, so ensure that you have sufficient time available.There are a few nature attractions nearby the museum, in the mountains surrounding the village.
Not for the claustrophobic!
Sep 2016
The tunnel museum is located to the north east of Beijing, out past the airport. Its free but you need to bring some form of ID (passport or residents card). It's a very small museum with all the exhibit's descriptions written in Chinese. We've tried and failed twice to visit this museum as it seems to be closed on arbitrary days, however this Sunday we had success. Despite everything being in Chinese the exhibits are very interesting with some hand made guns and rifles. There is a good diorama showing a cut away of the tunnel system and how it worked, as well as illustrations of the various entrances to the tunnels. The tunnels are across the road from the museum and you have to run the gauntlet of random traders selling cheap plastic toys and random fruit. Before entering the tunnels you are required to put your bag in a (free of charge) locker. The lockers will fit a handbag but won't fit a back pack. After several attempts to cram my husbands backpack into a tiny locker the gentlemen gave up and agreed to let him take it in. The tunnel entrance is inside a building and down some stairs. The minute I entered I realised this was a terrible mistake. I suffer mild claustrophobia and the narrow tunnels just tall enough for an adult (under 5'10") to pas through go in one direction. There is no indication of how long you will be walking for and there are no escape ways near the entrance. Within a few foot of the entrance you start wondering how the air gets into the tunnels and whether there is enough air for our little group of tourists. If you can quiet you panic enough to proceed there are interesting little off shoots including well entrances in the ceiling and stairs to tiny meeting rooms and other tunnels (one of which leads to a neighbouring village 2km down the road.) I'm afraid I spent the entire time hoping the next corner would lead to the exit and suppressing panic when I realised it didn't. You eventually emerge 800m further down the tunnel in a donkey stable. The exit to the museum contains a solitary 1950s jet, and a rather pretty lolly pond. The museum is interesting but I personally wouldn't make the trip unless it was on the way to see something else. Other attractions nearby include the stalactite cave at jingdong and a rather nice walk in the mountains.

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Andrew M
7,144 contributions
Interesting day trip from the airport
Aug 2018 • Family
My son and I stayed in an airport hotel in Beijing, and planned this visit as we had an early afternoon flight and wanted to avoid the traffic in the center of the city. The tunnel museum is a little over 30 km from the airport, in a north easterly direction. We took bus 3, from Terminal 2, which has a terminus outside of exit # 1 at the Peking Airport. The bus runs every half hour and costs 3 yuan. We exited the bus at the International Exhibition Center, which was approximately 10 minutes from the Airport. You will see the tall Crowne Plaza Hotel on your left before the bus makes this right turn onto G111 road, and the next bus stop is where you disembark. The subway station is located opposite the bus stop.

Wait for a few minutes at thsi bus stop, and take Bus 31, which runs every half hour to the tunnel site. This trip will take 35-40 minutes, and the terminus of Bus 31, is just past the tunnel museum.The cost of the trip is 6 yuan. When the bus stops, the museum is a 5 minute walk back in the direction from which the bus came. I would advise that you walk through the parking lot, which has great reliefs on the walls depicting the struggle against the Japanese troops. Many local vendors selling fruit, nuts and souvenirs are in this area .

Entrance is free, but passports are required to be shown, so that you can receive two tickets. The museum is comprised of two sections; museum exhibits and the tunnels. The white ticket will be taken from you at the museum, and the red tickets grants access to the tunnels which are to the rear of the museum, after crossing the street. In front of the museum, there is a sculpture of local fighters exiting a tunnel, and there are white marble reliefs on the exterior walls. The displays in the museum mainly relate to the items of daily life, how the tunnels were constructed and used, and home made weapons used by the fighters.There were a few photos of atrocities carried out by the Japanese on local people, and some famous WW2 photos e.g, surrender of Japan, raising the Soviet flag on the Reich Chancellery in Berlin

More souvenir vendors are found at the exit of the museum. A short walk over a bridge leads to the entrance to the tunnels, which is just to the left of a fighter jet monument. The tour of the tunnels can be self guided, as most of the signs had english translations, and the "side" tunnels had been blocked with barriers. It is cool in the tunnels, and at some places the ceiling was very low. There were no warning signs to indicate that the roof was low in places, so proceed with caution. All tunnels are damp, so there are a few slippery areas.There are numerous small cavities in the walls where fighters could hide, and the tunnels had drainage areas and wells for drinking water. Meeting rooms were also done, where 10 persons could gather, and the side passages led to pigstys, hollowed tree trunks and a donkey stable where the tunnel complex ends.

Although you have been walking in the tunnels for at least 15 minutes, the end of the tunnels is actually just behind where you originally entered. If you have 6 hours available in Beijing and want to avoid the busy city, this will be an enjoyable experience, particularly if you have young children who will have lots of fun in the tunnels.The wait for the buses may be slightly long, so ensure that you have sufficient time available.There are a few nature attractions nearby the museum, in the mountains surrounding the village.
Written August 19, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Ray S
Beijing, China305 contributions
Not for the claustrophobic!
Sep 2016 • Family
The tunnel museum is located to the north east of Beijing, out past the airport. Its free but you need to bring some form of ID (passport or residents card). It's a very small museum with all the exhibit's descriptions written in Chinese. We've tried and failed twice to visit this museum as it seems to be closed on arbitrary days, however this Sunday we had success.
Despite everything being in Chinese the exhibits are very interesting with some hand made guns and rifles. There is a good diorama showing a cut away of the tunnel system and how it worked, as well as illustrations of the various entrances to the tunnels.
The tunnels are across the road from the museum and you have to run the gauntlet of random traders selling cheap plastic toys and random fruit.
Before entering the tunnels you are required to put your bag in a (free of charge) locker. The lockers will fit a handbag but won't fit a back pack. After several attempts to cram my husbands backpack into a tiny locker the gentlemen gave up and agreed to let him take it in.
The tunnel entrance is inside a building and down some stairs. The minute I entered I realised this was a terrible mistake. I suffer mild claustrophobia and the narrow tunnels just tall enough for an adult (under 5'10") to pas through go in one direction. There is no indication of how long you will be walking for and there are no escape ways near the entrance. Within a few foot of the entrance you start wondering how the air gets into the tunnels and whether there is enough air for our little group of tourists.
If you can quiet you panic enough to proceed there are interesting little off shoots including well entrances in the ceiling and stairs to tiny meeting rooms and other tunnels (one of which leads to a neighbouring village 2km down the road.)
I'm afraid I spent the entire time hoping the next corner would lead to the exit and suppressing panic when I realised it didn't.
You eventually emerge 800m further down the tunnel in a donkey stable.
The exit to the museum contains a solitary 1950s jet, and a rather pretty lolly pond.
The museum is interesting but I personally wouldn't make the trip unless it was on the way to see something else. Other attractions nearby include the stalactite cave at jingdong and a rather nice walk in the mountains.

Written September 25, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Anna O
Singapore7 contributions
Tunnel Warfare Museum (JiaoZhuangHu)
Jun 2014 • Family
A nice morning out with children. I went with another friend and about 5 children between 5-7 years old. They had fun, hence we did too.

It's not the CuChi Tunnel in Vietnam, where you get to explore quite a lot of the tunnels, close to its original conditions. Here, the tunnels have been remodelled. Think smooth walls with evenly built arches and high enough "ceiling" that do not require any crouching. Many of the original parts of the tunnels were closed to visitors. The one thing that attracted me was the exit of the tunnel - from a donkey's trough. if you are going, make sure that you take this exit (up a ladder within a nook in the tunnel). Don't take the paved staircase. You cannot re-enter the museum once you have exited it … you'd need to get to the starting point to collect a new set of tickets (if permitted). So … if you make your way there, make sure that you explore every nook and corner within the tunnel.

A good time to visit is in summer - you can avoid the summer heat, as it's cool in the tunnels. Entrance to the museum is free. You'd need to call in advance (60461906) to make bookings. To collect your tickets, the adults need to bring along passports. No identification needed for children.

If you have children, need a place for them to burn some energy - go for it. Else, skip it.
Written July 7, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Frequently Asked Questions about Museum of the?Tunnel?Warfare?of Jiaozhuanghu

Museum of the?Tunnel?Warfare?of Jiaozhuanghu is open:
  • Sun - Sat 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM