Colossi of Memnon

Colossi of Memnon, Luxor

Colossi of Memnon
4
Ancient Ruins • Monuments & Statues
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Two enthroned statues of Amenhotep III, each soaring more than 60 feet into the sky, are the first monuments visitors see on arriving in the West Bank.
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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4.0
2,024 reviews
Excellent
641
Very good
741
Average
539
Poor
88
Terrible
15

DEK_29
Brisbane, Australia1,087 contributions
Jan 2020
At the time of my first visit in 2010, the Egyptian Supreme Council of Antiquities had undertaken a dig in the location behind the colossi and had found dozens of statues, including a red granite double statue featuring Amenhotep III with the falcon-headed sun god Re-Horakhti. In fact I saw a documentary last year that showed more than twelve statues some of which were five metres high. Another was in pieces and would be at least as large as the colossi. With this dig going on, access to the back of the colossi is still curtailed.

The Colossi of Memnon, sculptured and built for Amenhotep III (known as Amenhotep the Magnificent and father to Akhenaten) are an imposing duo. I'm 1.9 metres tall and these statues are huge compared to me (have a look at the photographs to see the size comparison). Originally set in front of Amenhotep’s vast mortuary temple which was said to be 100 meters wide and 600 meters long.

It only takes a short time to photograph these great statues. However while I was there, I pondered on the idea that these remnants of a by-gone era have stood there for four millennia gazing across the fields towards Thebes while the ground level steadily grew. When visiting these silent sentinels, stop, photograph and think, I’m sure Amenhotep would appreciate it.

Tip:
Watch the 1966 movie Khartoum which has a fantastic opening showing what Egypt was like back in the 1880s and in pharaonic times. It shows the landscape around the colossi flooded as it did every yer during the time of the Pharaohs.
Written September 12, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

john n
Camberley, UK451 contributions
Feb 2020
Spectacular due to their size but one of the least riveting places we visited. It was a bit of a bolt-on after a trip to The Valley of the Kings and is rather "work in progress". Nevertheless the sheer size of the two main statues is worth the short detour. There are other, smaller artefacts to look at but it's a shame that the external condition of the statues of Amenhotep are a bit care worn but it is wo
Written January 31, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

pan_viator
Teignmouth, UK181 contributions
Jan 2020
Yes, it's crowded and looks rather battered, but...
Take a walk along the road beside the site. There are several notice boards that give the history of the site and explain how it is being conserved. You also get to see parts that the people who do a quick stop at the car park don't look at.
Past the end of the site there is a place where new mud bricks are being made. The bricks are being used to repair and protect some of the structures.
Written January 18, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Linda Y
Frisco, TX5,194 contributions
Jan 2020
These massive statues, completed in 1350 BC, were designed to be twin guardians of the Temple of Amenhotep III. Unfortunately, the temple was built on the Nile flood plain. As a result of erosion from the annual flooding of the Nile and looting by successive pharaohs, little remains of the temple except for the faceless, and badly damaged, statues. Still, it’s worth a quick stop here just to admire their sheer size. Standing 60 ft (18 m) tall, each statue was cut from a single block of stone and weighs 1000 tons. The name originated from the Greeks and Romans who mistakenly thought the statues were a tribute to Memnon, an Ethiopian king that was a hero of the Trojan war. Word of warning about the touts located by the statues. They aggressively crowded around the bus as we got off. By the way, there is a colossal head of Amenhotep III in the Luxor Museum that is in pristine condition.
Written April 30, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Ekspertas
Vilnius, Lithuania339 contributions
Nov 2021
Yes, it deserves a quick stop only for nice photo and typically done as a first stop arriving at Luxor or the last one - leaving it. But what it makes so impressive, is the scale of it and scenery - massive collosus "standing" on empty field. Trully fantasy style movie decoration.
Written December 29, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

TheFadi
Cairo, Egypt30 contributions
Mar 2021
This Twin statue site is another site to see on the west bank. Recommended to see after the Valley of Kings and the temple of Hatshepsut. Its free entrance site right off the road. It is said that when the wind passes by through the statues they make a humming sound.
Written March 15, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Sade
Bethesda39 contributions
Feb 2021 • Solo
No entrance tickets required... off main road for viewing... gigantic semi twin faceless stone statues of Egyptian pharaohs. Located on West Bank side on Nile river. Well worth a visit.
Written March 2, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

dxlake
Cahors, France45 contributions
Feb 2020
We saw these from a balloon ride and then again on the ground. It's not a site you need to spend much time at, but the mind boggles at stuff like this--these two giant statues... the scale the Egyptians built in was mind-boggling.
Written February 25, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

WImom
Fond du Lac, WI2,339 contributions
Jan 2020
This attraction is written in most tour books. But, it is actually underwhelming to see. There is no admission charge. You can quickly snap a photo and be on your way. Of course, there are vendors here also. It does have an interesting history and is the first monuments that you see upon entering the west bank. The two faceless Colossi of Memnon were each cut from a single block of stone and weigh 1000 tons. They are set in front of the main entrance to a funerary temple, the largest in Egypt, which are slowly being excavated.
Written November 25, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

ZhaoXiuMei
Singapore, Singapore4,953 contributions
Dec 2019
We passed by the 2 statutes on our way to the Valley of the Kings and again after visiting Hatshepsut Temple.
The 2 seated monumental statues, 20m tall, represent Amenhotep III. They were built in 14th century BC, during the period in Egypt history known as the New Kingdom. Imagine the 2 statutes have been around for 3500 years!
We made a quick photo stops as many were too tired to get off the coach.
Written February 2, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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