Tombs of Ankhtifi and Sobekhotep at El-Moalla

Tombs of Ankhtifi and Sobekhotep at El-Moalla, Luxor

Tombs of Ankhtifi and Sobekhotep at El-Moalla

Tombs of Ankhtifi and Sobekhotep at El-Moalla
4.5

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4.5
25 reviews
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Craig T
San Rafael, CA1,048 contributions
A Very Interesting Tomb, Indeed!
Oct 2019
Although I've been to Egypt six times, this was the first time to Ankhtifi's tomb and we went there thanks to an Egyptologist friend of ours who suggested it. It's definitely off the beaten path of the tombs of Luxor's west bank, as it is 45 kilometers south of Luxor. Ankhtifi was a governor of this area during the First Intermediate Period, between the Old and Middle Kingdoms. There is not a lot known about this time in Egyptian history, so this tomb has given Egyptologists a lot of information. The carvings and drawings are unique, almost cartoon like.

If you have some extra time and are truly an Egyptology nut, don't miss this tomb!
Written November 14, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Bielding
Liverpool147 contributions
Richly rewarding tomb for the specialist
Apr 2017 • Solo
Ankhtify's tomb is a must for all archaeologists and Egyptologists - for its remarkable biography of the warlord (I think casual tourists would probably get more out of the tombs on the West bank at Luxor, however).

What struck me when I visited in April 2017, however, was the extremely vivid colours and lively execution of the paintings of cattle, and soldiers.

The drive to the tomb is nice and rural - it can be combined with a visit to el-Tod and Esna as a part-day trip from Luxor quite easily. Please note that tickets to el-Tod and Moalla have to be bought at the ticket office at the entrance to the Temple of Luxor.
Written May 20, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

52Jeanni29
Wirral, UK46 contributions
Wonderful tombs
Dec 2016 • Solo
Its incredible that so much has been preserved and celebrated with us to be able to look at what people saw 3 thousand years ago
Written January 25, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Kimberly S
Martinez, CA140 contributions
go treasure hunting
Apr 2016 • Solo
For the average tourist, this is a disappointing tomb, in very fragmentary shape. Historically, it's very important, giving us information from the 1st Intermediate Period. So take the broken state of the decoration as a challenge - go hunting for interesting bits! Don't miss the charming grey and white donkeys transporting grain. Ankhtify has an unusual variety of fish in his hunting scene, and a unique spool of line held in one hand. Don't overlook the pillars - they have some of the more interesting bits of decoration and more charming animals, like a calf and gazelle brought as offerings. An easy slope climb. Be aware you must purchase your ticket for this site in Luxor.
Written May 22, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Arch K
Keith, UK59 contributions
One for the enthusiast
Apr 2016 • Solo
The tomb of Ankhtifi, for the enthusiastic Egyptophile, is well worth a visit. Not so good for the ordinary tourist. The tomb is one of a number in the area, a fairly standard design rock-cut tomb, with a fairly important inscription and remnants of some fine paintwork. Just be careful not to fall into any of the surrounding, largely unexcavated, shaft tombs. Photography in the tomb is not allowed and that rule is more strictly enforced here than I have found anywhere else in Egypt.
Written April 8, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

jansvis
Malden, The Netherlands72 contributions
For the discerning
Feb 2016 • Couples
The tomb of Ankhtifi in Mo'alla on the EASTbank near Esna is neither beautiful, nor spectacular. But it is very interesting. It tell a story about a time in Egypt when crops failed and people were so hungry they even ate their children. The tomb is little known. Get your ticket at the Luxor temple.
Written February 29, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

deb0rahanne
Coventry, UK14 contributions
guide very informative
Jul 2015
again another interesting piece of history had a very informative guide.wasnt rushed.not too croudy due to not many tourists at present which is just such a shame
Written October 29, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

David L
Birmingham, UK220 contributions
1st intermediate tombs
Aug 2015 • Family
Less visited tickets are from Luxor temple make sure you get them before going, not often visited by tourists and only 45 minutes drive out of Luxor much older than other tombs you will visit 1st intermediate period
Written September 7, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Martin F
Darwen, UK60 contributions
Not a tourist attraction in the traditional sense but worth weedling your way in!
Jul 2014 • Couples
Having been tipped off that this First Intermediate (transitional) period tomb is a must we decided to go for it. Our taxi driver was the same guy we always use and so he was well able to "ease the way" at unusual sites and those which are not open to the public - this tomb definitely fell into that category back when we visited it, although with the constantly changing nature of access to sites in Egypt this may well have been open to the public for some time by now. Anyhow I digress - get yourself to El Moalla and get your taxi driver to ask what's what - it's not very far from Luxor and if you get in you shouldn't be disappointed. We found an old guy sat at the side of the road with a WW1 vintage rifle on his lap. After a brief chat with our driver he wandered off and so we sat on a mound of rubble and sand awaiting events! About 20 minutes passed during which time we almost pulled the plug, however a middling crowd of people eventually appeared on the horizon walking in our direction and led by a guy with the tomb key attached to the most enormous piece of wood carved into an ankh. He opened the tomb with great ceremony and in we went. To say we were unprepared is an understatement. Ankhtify was to all intents and purposes the mayor of this particular district at a time when the state of Egypt was in terminal decline not long after the pyramid builders had done their thing. He was buried in this fairly plain tomb with the district's adopted sacred animal attached to his mummy - literally. He was in large chunks scattered about the floor (well he was back then) and his entire arm, bent at 90 degrees at the elbow, had a large mummified fish attached to it! This in itself is unusual because fish are not particularly revered in Egypt. Anyhow the story of this strange tomb is there to see in the slightly crude heiroglyphs and paintings - seemingly at the time of his burial the Egypt Ankhtify knew was in turmoil and the inscriptions tell of people eating their own children such was the famine. Now for many a year the archaeologists assumed this was artistic license on Ankhtify's part however recent evidence, both from a burial in Cairo, and from the sea bed off Portugal (I'm not going into too much detail here - go find the Horizon program about it and see for yourself) suggests that the evidence was far from exaggerated after all - the earth was suffering a huge but fairly short-lived climate glitch resulting in large tracts of fertile farming land in Nubia becoming barren desert. But I digress... with just myself and my wife in this tomb (apart from the guard) the air of wonder and privilege was great indeed, and despite the somewhat crude nature of the tomb decoration and fragmentary remains of the owner it was worth every penny of the baksheesh we paid for the pleasure of being afforded entry. If you are a "tourist" rather than an Egyptophile this is probably not for you - stick instead to the Graeco-Roman temples of Edfu and Esna etc and the complex at Karnak. But if you have a smattering of hyroglyphics and a thirst for the unusual then this tomb is an absolute must see. BTW - the date I have selected for our visit is more than 10 years out - there's no option for the year we went. Do please be aware then that this is a long way from up to date info but as I say, if you are a mad keen amateur Egyptophile it's well worth the effort of seeking out this tomb.
Written June 26, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

SuzyQScotlandUk
Falkirk, UK580 contributions
Okay
Sep 2014
Not the best of Egyptian toms but you need to go to experience all aspects of Egyptian history. Make the most of it
Written June 6, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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