Nilometer
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles104 reviews
Excellent
48
Very good
45
Average
10
Poor
0
Terrible
1

arwa76
58 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2023 • Friends
It’s an interesting place and concept. The place is small so you’ll spend around 15 minutes inside it. At the entrance, we requested and paid for 3 tickets (EL 60, 20 per adult as foreigners); however, the person in charge gave us only 2 tickets and said it’s ok!! He insisted to come with us to explain and we gave him a tip for that. On our way out, he said that he wants the tickets back. It turned out that he sells the same tickets for more than one person and steals the money of his own employer. A very shameful behavior which makes you sad for Egypt.
Written April 29, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

achidz
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia242 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2022 • Couples
So glad I came across this online. We walked from Coptic Cairo and it took us over a gorgeous footbridge. The grounds are peaceful, and the nilometer and the structure it’s housed in is really impressive! 40 per person, and a tip for whoever unlocks the door to the nilometer!
Written February 22, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

hilarymunro
Edinburgh, UK448 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2012 • Friends
Not many people take the footbridge over and the guide can only speak Arabic. Make the effort though, it is worth it.
Like Goldilocks and the porridge, there were three intakes to measure the Spring/early summer Nile flood - too much or too little flood water resulted in famine or drownings and a reduced tax to the government. The middle one was just right and premium taxes were paid. The extraordinary thing is that, until the Aswan dam was built, farmers taxes were calculated in the same way as in Pharaonic times. When the dam was built the ingress to the Nileometer were stopped-up so the farmers wouldn't appeal because the water was so low!
It is an interesting place: For a very short fee you can walk right down to the bottom of it, and the stone carving is beautiful.
I'm not sure how such a structure can be destroyed by floods, but, according to historians, sometime in the 9th Century the nileometer was repaired and given the roof it has today by Uzbek famous astronomer, mathematician and geographer Abu al Abbas Ahmad al Farghini - the guy who calculated the world's diameter among other things.
His statue, given in 2007 by the Uzbekistan government to Egypt, is in front of you as you come in the gate.
The Nileometer stands in the grounds of Umm Kaltoum, the celebrated singer.
Written May 12, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

amiragh
Prague, Czech Republic50 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2017 • Family
I've heard about this place and had time so decided to go visit it, when i arrived there i couldn't believe my eyes. That place was soooo wonderful, spectacular, the construction is so incredible, the guy that checks the ticket is soooo nice he explained the whole history of the place and since there were no one after us visiting he took us to see a secret door that takes you to the nile to see how the nilometer works. Moreover the view from there was awesoooome. And right next to the nilometer there's the museum of Oum Keltoum a worldwide reknown egyptian singer. I would totally recommend hoing to that place. To go back you might need to call an uber cause there are not much taxis around there.
Written November 1, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TopKingofKings
United Kingdom607 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2013 • Family
This place is a good place to see if you have some spare time on you and doesn't cost you much to enter. I was lucky enough to go down to the bottom of the pit with some gentle persuasion with the worker there and showing off my arabic does help quite considerably. Umm Kalsoom museum is there as well and it's worth seeing. The place is small located around the Rhoda Island and takes less than 1 hour to see everything
Written March 17, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jacques A. Weber
Austin, TX45 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2012 • Solo
I don't care what you do in Cairo; you need to go see the Nilometer. It's an easy trip and it's at the southern tip of Rhoda Island. When I went, I was the only one there for the half an hour that I visited the site. The "gate keeper" took me in, provided a brief explanation, and let me climb all the way down into the pit. It's a fascinating piece of ancient architecture.
Written August 29, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brun066
Florence, Italy13,213 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
Like almost all people of medium culture, even before any visit to Egypt I have heard about Nilometers. I also know the large Roman mosaic of Palestrina (Italy), depicting the Nile and where a beautiful well-shaped Nilometer is also clearly visible. Finally, on a previous trip, I visited the Nilometers in Elephantine and in Kom Ombo.
This one in Rodah (according to the chronicles, built in 715 and rebuilt in 861 AD) is certainly the most beautiful and elaborate among the Nilometers I have seen, and is a "not to be missed", even with all the wonders that there are to see in Cairo and its surroundings .
After the trip, however, I got the curiosity to understand if and how this medieval Nilometer had on-site ancestors in the Pharaonic era (which is often understood); and if there is evidence of this.
So I came across the highly documented article by Étienne Drioton (former curator of the Egyptian section at the Louvre museum), "Les origines pharaoniques du Nilomètre de Rodah" (1952).
From this writing it's clear that actually a Nilometer located in the nearby area should be the oldest in Egypt (it would even date back to the predynastic era, ie before 3100 BC). But it's important to know that it - according to the religious texts examined by Drioton - was not located here in Rodah (where after all the diggings carried out didn't reveal such ancient remains), but in Per-Hâpi; location to be identified with Helwan, 20 km further south.
It's evocative to imagine the Pharaoh who, having heard from his officials of the arrival of the flood, lays his hands on the river intimating "get up, Nile", thus arousing amazement and reverence in his subjects. But this image is no less effective if the scene is believed to take place in Helwan instead of Rodah.
Written March 23, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kevin O
Toronto91 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2018 • Couples
This is worth the visit, and is open in Nov 2018, despite what taxi drivers might tell you when they are trying to talk you into taking a US$20 tour with them instead of a LE30 trip in their taxi. Take Careem or Uber instead. If they let you off on the Corniche, walk across the foot bridge over the river, turn left, and walk about 100 metres. It is in the complex of the Umm Khultum Museum, but it is a separate ticket (LE40).
Written November 13, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Debbie H
London, UK130 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2016 • Family
The Nilometer is right next door to the more clearly signposted Oum Kalthoum Museum on the edge of Rhoda Island. The views alone from here are beautiful. The Nilometer looks amazing from the outside and appears closed as at the moment due to lack of tourist traffic it is not left open. But if you find one of the guards in the area they will unlock the doors and let you in.Opening hours are 11-4. Inside the structure is amazing as the paintwork and lighting complement each other perfectly. Used to measure the annual water level off the Nile you can also (if you get a nice guard or tip a little) walk down the inner steps to get a more up close look. I did and although there is no rail and the steps are a tad steep they are at least wide enough that you can use the wall for support. If you have some extra time in Cairo or are around the general area (not all that far from the citadel then it is well worth dropping by to see the Nilometer.
Written November 23, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Diane W
Broadway, NC187 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2014 • Friends
If you have more than a few days to spend in Cairo as a tourist, or if you will be living here for a while, The Nilometer on Rawdah Island is worth visiting. I declined the opportunity to descend the steps to the bottom because I was wearing the wrong shoes and there were no handrails and somewhat uneven steps. This is a tranquil spot in otherwise chaotic Cairo, so you may want to just sit and relax before leaving. You can make a day of it by also seeing the Um Kulthum Museum right next door and then taking the foot bridge to Old (Coptic) Cairo. Check in advance to see if the Manyal Palace on Saray Street at the opposite end of the island has opened yet. I hear that it is magnificent, but it was still closed for restoration when I stopped by in mid-October 2014.
Written October 15, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Nilometer - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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