Hanbok Museum
Hanbok Museum
5
What people are saying
Andreia
By Andreia
The Hanbok Museum that no one seems to know that exists
4.0 of 5 bubblesAug 2017
Hanbok, the national attire of Korea has a museum of its on in Seoul. Its located across the street from Gyeongbokgung Palace / Geonchunmun Gate (east side). It is right next to the Kumho Museum of Art. Brimming with cultural and historical sites throughout the city it is a bit surprising that this museum goes unnoticed by most people visiting Seoul. Although it is understandable. Even I only got to know about it when I stumbled upon its existence online by chance when looking for info about the Kimchi Museum whereabouts. It was a bit hard to find it since even the locals didn't know that there was a Hanbok museum so close to them. This museum is the life work of the hanbok designer Lee Ri Ja and it has the particularity that it is only open on the first and third Saturday of every month. It has an admission fee of ₩10,000 per person (the same price applies for children – August 2017). I asked the lady if children had to pay the same price or if it was cheaper but she didn't speak English nor did she seemed to understand it. Yet she was very kind to us from beginning to end and even offered us fresh water when we arrived without even having asked for it. It was also nice that all the floors of the museum had air conditioning. The museum is composed by 3 floors: The Entrance (ground floor/ 1F) its where you find the reception on your right side that its also a shop. In here you will find all kinds of materials needed be able to create an Hanbok and even photos of the designer herself. 2F (2nd floor) exhibits delicate works of embroidery finely sewn together and a photo of the designer as well a small text about her life and what made her pursue the path of an Hanbok designer. “In 2000 and onward, Lee Rheeza started to use pieces of clothes to make Hanbok. Sewing patchwork clothes that she had been collecting, gives her inspiration in her work and it also became a source of power that enabled her to fight over her illness. Eventually, this new way of working of hers, brings another fashion trend into the industry. Patchwork wrapping cloth and Hanbok made by pieces of ramie, silk, hemp tells us more about the designer Lee Rhee Za who is always challenging herself and studying new ways to create Hanbok.” - taken from the postcards I received from the lady at the museum. 3F (3rd floor) here you will learn about the evolution of the Hanbok and the tools used to create it. It also highlights the circle of life from birth to death and the clothes they had to wear for each occasion throughout their lifetime. All the Hanbok on display were created by the Lee Ri Ja, the Hanbok designer. You will also find lots of ornaments such as hairpins and norigae to name a few. At the centre of the room you will find two wooden litters (vehicles) known in Korea as gama. The museum has a working lift in case you have mobility problems or are with children.

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Andreia
Cork, Ireland484 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2017 • Family
Hanbok, the national attire of Korea has a museum of its on in Seoul. Its located across the street from Gyeongbokgung Palace / Geonchunmun Gate (east side). It is right next to the Kumho Museum of Art.

Brimming with cultural and historical sites throughout the city it is a bit surprising that this museum goes unnoticed by most people visiting Seoul. Although it is understandable. Even I only got to know about it when I stumbled upon its existence online by chance when looking for info about the Kimchi Museum whereabouts. It was a bit hard to find it since even the locals didn't know that there was a Hanbok museum so close to them.

This museum is the life work of the hanbok designer Lee Ri Ja and it has the particularity that it is only open on the first and third Saturday of every month.

It has an admission fee of ₩10,000 per person (the same price applies for children – August 2017).

I asked the lady if children had to pay the same price or if it was cheaper but she didn't speak English nor did she seemed to understand it. Yet she was very kind to us from beginning to end and even offered us fresh water when we arrived without even having asked for it. It was also nice that all the floors of the museum had air conditioning.

The museum is composed by 3 floors:

The Entrance (ground floor/ 1F) its where you find the reception on your right side that its also a shop. In here you will find all kinds of materials needed be able to create an Hanbok and even photos of the designer herself.

2F (2nd floor) exhibits delicate works of embroidery finely sewn together and a photo of the designer as well a small text about her life and what made her pursue the path of an Hanbok designer.

“In 2000 and onward, Lee Rheeza started to use pieces of clothes to make Hanbok. Sewing patchwork clothes that she had been collecting, gives her inspiration in her work and it also became a source of power that enabled her to fight over her illness. Eventually, this new way of working of hers, brings another fashion trend into the industry. Patchwork wrapping cloth and Hanbok made by pieces of ramie, silk, hemp tells us more about the designer Lee Rhee Za who is always challenging herself and studying new ways to create Hanbok.” - taken from the postcards I received from the lady at the museum.

3F (3rd floor) here you will learn about the evolution of the Hanbok and the tools used to create it. It also highlights the circle of life from birth to death and the clothes they had to wear for each occasion throughout their lifetime.

All the Hanbok on display were created by the Lee Ri Ja, the Hanbok designer. You will also find lots of ornaments such as hairpins and norigae to name a few. At the centre of the room you will find two wooden litters (vehicles) known in Korea as gama.

The museum has a working lift in case you have mobility problems or are with children.
Written March 19, 2018
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