The War and Women's Human Rights Museum

The War and Women's Human Rights Museum

The War and Women's Human Rights Museum
4.5
11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday
11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday
11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday
11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday
11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday
11:00 AM - 6:00 PM
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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4.5
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Maruachi
Seoul, South Korea215 contributions
Jul 2014 • Family
I went to this place with my wife and teenage daughter, and it was a truly meaning visit for all of us. It's a small but valuable museum mainly focusing on victims of sex slavery by the Japanese before and during the World War Two, still an ongoing heated issue yet to be settled.

However, the museum does not intend to provoke a sort of anti-Japanese sentiment often displayed by the Korean nationalists. Instead, the museum calmly and clearly views the issue as the violence against women frequently committed in the wartime. There is also a dedicated section about the wartime sexual violence committed in Kosovo and Congo wars.

I hope the museum continues to develop and help reach out to the victims of war crimes in other international conflicts as well.
Written August 21, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

CanisHan
Seoul, South Korea21,943 contributions
Feb 2019 • Family
CC ( 19.02.16 )
I and my son visited this museum to know more about enforced sex slaves by Japan. No photo inside, and had many exhibit about enforced sex slaves in WW II. The exhibits was more terrible than I think, and I felt sorry for women in these times. The inside was a little small, but well-managed. In some area, special exhibit was held about Vietnamese women's victim who was harmed in Vietnam War by Korean soldier. I felt sorry, too. Without considering national benefit and nationality, we don't forget and must console about innocent people who had much pain.
Written February 17, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

putrisalat
Singapore61 contributions
Nov 2016 • Solo
it's a bit confusing to get to the museum. from hongik stn exit 2, turn left and walk further down to the bus stop for bus number 15. then stop at Gyeongseong High School intersection on street name - World Cup buk ro 11 gil. cross the street and there should be a sign with the name of the museum pointing into an alley where the museum is. but it's definitely worth the journey! really heartbreaking and eye opening experience learning about this aspect of war which is not usually talked about in many history books. learning about what these women were forced to endure makes me have great respect and admiration for all these women who have stepped forward to share their story and fight for their right to be recognised. we are standing on the shoulders of these great women. definitely a must-visit when in korea.

entrance fee is 3,000won and if you don't understand Korean, they will give you an audioguide (eng + other lang) to guide you through the museum for free.
Written November 9, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

DogbertsCat
Cambridge, UK25 contributions
Sep 2016 • Couples
Surprising on many levels, the museum is located in a hard-to-find side street relatively far from the city centre having been initially granted and subsequently blocked from a site within the Independence Park as it was deemed an inappropriate location by some.

The museum is remarkably discreet from the outside, the main entrance could be mistaken for a side door, however a wall covered in paper butterflies with hand-written messages from past visitors gives it away.

A surprising amount of the museum is dedicated to evidence that the atrocities happened at all: diaries, maps, photos - simple but clear indicators which are then followed by the Japanese government denials and subsequent legal cases.

The story is hard. The outcome of their struggle for recognition remains uncertain. It is a deeply engaging place which is worth the trip.

There is English language captioning on each exhibit but it is somewhat limited in content. If you have the opportunity to go with someone who can read the Korean text it will add a lot.
Written September 15, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

e_moshun
Calgary, Canada95 contributions
Dec 2012 • Friends
While there are many fun things to do in Seoul, such as the Trickeye museum, shopping and kpop galore, it is also worthwhile to take a visit to this museum. Touching upon a part of history that is still quite unknown to people (although there have been more attention to this issue recently) this museum gives you insight to the "comfort women" issue of the past where many females in Japanese colonialized and occupied areas were forced to be military sex slaves for the Japanese army.
Although a lot of people write this off as a "japanese-korean" problem, it isn't necessarily as it applies to a lot of similar issues in the present right now such as human trafficking. I won't write too much on this, only that if time permits - you won't be dissapointed visiting this museum and I would hope that you'd leave inspired to understand more about violence against women.
Written October 29, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Becca and Emily
Shanghai, China70 contributions
Oct 2019 • Couples
I came here with my girlfriend and we were stunned by this museum. It is a truly eye opening experience not only to the past but what is still happening in present day. They give you an audioguide, which is very helpful as most of the displays are in Korean. As well as being very educational and informative, the museum gives you the opportunity to donate to help fight for the end of sexual slavery and for the freedom of the women who have been affected.
Anyone and everyone should go to this museum, and appreciate the bravery of the women who have stepped forward and shared their stories.
Written October 1, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

jessiefok28
Birmingham, UK22 contributions
Aug 2014 • Solo
What a hidden gem in Seoul.

Lots of people were questioning me if I was feeling too bored to go to such a place, but after all I think I was right persisting.
The War and Women's Human Rights Museum makes you reflect truly on what it would be like being a comfort woman and so as all the related gender theories.
I particularly like how it plays warring sounds as you are walking through the path that takes you to the underground exhibition room.

Dark yet homey enough.
And very informative.
The War and Women's Human Rights Museum is one of the best museums I have ever been to in in Korea (I had a hard time finding it though!).
Written August 25, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Wendy L
Irvine, CA131 contributions
Oct 2013 • Business
First, be aware that some people refer to this as the "Comfort Women Museum." That is the topic of the museum, but not its official name. Also be aware that this is a difficult place to find. Considering how little English most cab drivers in Seoul speak, you may want to get detailed directions from your hotel concierge before going here.

The museum is small, but well done. Most of the displays are in Korean, so I really appreciated the audio tour that was included in the admission price--the audio is available in several languages. I certainly knew a little about the topic of "comfort women" before visiting this museum, but I learned so much more after my visit. What a tragic period of history. Because the museum is small, you will not need more than one hour to visit.
Written November 10, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

J9Koffel
Iwakuni, Japan228 contributions
May 2019 • Solo
Tucked away in a little neighborhood, this museum is a small, intimate experience of a terrible chapter in the history of World War II. The English audio guide walks visitors through the little building, where art, personal stories, and artifacts tell the painful stories of “comfort women,” sex slaves who served the Imperial Japanese Army after being abducted and forced into service. A ‘must see’ destination to understand how widespread violence against women was a historical reality that has yet to end. Stories of sexual violence that continues today in other parts of the world are also reflected in an included exhibit. Appropriate for youth ages 13 and older (many of the sex slaves were younger at the time of their kidnapping). I was glad to see both young women and men taking their time to thoughtfully proceed through the museum.
Written May 25, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Chris F
Oahu, HI179 contributions
May 2018 • Family
The museum has an important purpose and a precautionary tale of the evils of war. Neither our taxi driver nor the concierge in our hotel had ever heard of this museum, and the location seemed like an hour from anywhere else you would rather be in Korea - but the visit was important to one person in our party and for that reason we all went. It will not be everyone's cup of tea. But I suppose you don't have to drink tea to know that it exists. The museum highlights a terrible aspect of war - one that has not been formally recognized by the Japanese governments. There are funds being raised for the victims, but it seems that the victims are not seeking compensation from donors but recognition of what happened and how awful it was - and by extension how terrible that it is as it continues to happen in other wars. Not a happy visit - but there is a message in there somewhere.
Written May 29, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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The War and Women's Human Rights Museum, Seoul

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The War and Women's Human Rights Museum is open:
  • Tue - Sat 11:00 AM - 6:00 PM


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