Musmeah Yeshua Synagogue
Musmeah Yeshua Synagogue
4.5
Monday
9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Tuesday
9:30 AM - 12:00 PM
Wednesday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Thursday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Friday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Saturday
9:30 AM - 1:00 PM
About
Dating from 1896, this is the only Jewish temple remaining in the city.
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles377 reviews
Excellent
214
Very good
118
Average
35
Poor
7
Terrible
3

SC Ling
Malaysia115 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020 • Family
Never thought of visiting a Jewish Synagogue in a popular Buddhist nation of Myanmar. I could see Myanmar (especially in Yangon) is a melting pot of different religions and races, of which we easily see Buddhist temples, churches, mosques and even synagogue in the same city area. Hoping this harmony spirit will lift up forever, cheers!
Written January 2, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

moniquersvp
New Orleans, LA372 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Stayed at the Strand Hotel and told the concierge that I was interested in seeing they synagogue that day. The concierge callet the synagogue president who said he could meet us there in around 30 minutes. It is on a crowded street with store fronts.
He was very nice and told us some of the history when there was a thriving jewish community in Burma. Now there are 8 jewish families total in the country. The synagogue was sephardic with a central area. There is no rabbi but I think someone comes from Thailand for the holidays. Of note was the fact that all religions got along, a moslem worker was fixing something at the synagogue. The president said that there were buddhists and moslems on the same street and there were no problems among the religions.I think an interesting place to see if you are interested in religions, or if you are jewish.
Written September 20, 2009
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Prasanna W
Bangkok, Thailand30 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2012 • Couples
Burma, Burma: after so many years of isolation, the sleeping giant of Asia is waking up. The streets of Yangon are bustling and the traffic is mad, with so many new vehicles on the road.New hotels and new construction coming up everywhere.In the midst of all this chaos, the Shwe agon dreams on, eternity captured.
We had not been to Burma in 12 years:years in which the world moved on, and Burma stayed put in its dark niche, largely forgotten except for human rights violations, gas pipelines, and occasional C4 docs on Aung Sang Suu Kyii. Then in the past 2 years, everything changed, and its a new game:Burma has a new president making daring choices, and freedom is everywhere, with the Lady now about to step into centre stage. The Golden land, Suwannabhumi, is on the move.
We had heard about the last synagogue in SEAsia, and wanted to see it:this idea of a Jewish corner in deeply Buddhist Burma, hidden away in a busy market street in old Yangon, is deeply intriguing.We found it after two or three passes:the street are narrow and full of pastiches of old Rangoon, when Burmah Oil, steamships, and the Irrawaddy Flotilla company. Thin, sun-baked south Asian men in longyis still wheel carts full of bales, the muzzein calls from a distant mosque, and cars and pedestrians vie for space in streets jst about wide enough for a car to pass.Looming over the streets are old shophouses, warehouses(godowns as they were called in the early 20th century), and grey-blue skies. It was a dazzling ensemble of sound and colour.

When we found the Musmeah Yeshiva synagogue, it was very apt: right in the middle of the Muslim quarter, the people of the book were in tandem.The facade was of a clean old house with the start of David blazed on top of the entance portal:there was an old man in a faded longyi and a vest, sleeping in a chair in the front.After some rattling of gates, we got his attention, and he opened the gates to a glorious interior.
High vaulted ceilings holding several ancient chandeliers lit up the two torahs that remained:it was empty of people, but full of what once was:a thriving Jewish community, of families lie the Sophears, the Sassoons, the Cohens, a mix of Sephardic and AShkenazi backgrounds:most were from Baghdad, reaching this boomtown on the Irrawaddy in the 19th century. There even was a Jewish mayor-David Sophaer, of Rangoon in the 1930s.
It was an extraordinary moment, seeing this temple in the dreaming golden land of Burma.What memories this synagogue must hold:that it still her, and well looked after, is a testament to the last few Jewish families left in Yangon.
The temple interior was redolent with the past, and perhaps of the future to come as well. The Golden land shared its dreams with so many communities in the past, and it is coming together again.Go visit the synagogue in Yangon if you want to taste what old Rangoon was like.
Written September 17, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

sparrow826
Toronto, Canada174 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
We made a short stop at Yangon's only synagogue in the middle of the day when the temperature was too hot for sightseeing outside. It was indeed interesting to visit a synagogue in a major Buddhist country. There are photos on display depicting the history of the small Jewish population in Yangon. It's worth a visit while in the city.
Written May 19, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Carla A
Salem, OR331 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2012 • Solo
Well, I walked down towards Chinatown from Sule Pagoda in search of this Jewish Synagogue and found it! Lovely! On the left side of the main street was a small sign pointing to the Synagogue. I spent time there looking at everything and met Moses one of the few remaining Jews in Yangon. He told me various things about the Synagogue and answered my questions and gave me a two-page written history of the place.

I'm not Jewish, but I found the place to be very interesting and was able to climb all the way up to the third floor area and snoop around. While there I met two Jewish tourists from Belgium and we had a nice chat.

His son, Sammy now lives in New York and has started a tour company to bring people to Myanmar.

A few days later, my interest was peaked when I learned of the Jewish Cemetary in Yangon and that it is sits in the city and the local government has tried to move it somewhere because the land where it currently sits is quite valuable and they want to develop it, etc.

Well, my understanding is that Moses was able to raise money or something to save the land.

So, a few days after my visit to the synagogue, I was able to find the address of the cemetary and set out in hopes of finding it. I did find it and was not allowed entrance. They called the synagogue and allowed me to speak to Moses who explained that the cemetary is well protected and anyone wishing to visit, must have a permission document from Moses and that if I wanted to obtain such a document, I should come to the synagogue again.

So, I went back to the synagogue and Moses prepared a small stamped document with my name and his, etc. and later that afternoon when I had time (after doing the Yangon Circular 3-hour train circuit) I walked back to the cemetary which is very near the train station and was allowed entrance to the fairly large walled cemetary with a zillion tombs that are placed inches from each other. The sight was really something to behold and it was interesting to see the Hebrew inscriptions on the tombs. Some had English writing and it was clear that some were very very old. There were a large number of very small tombs for babies and children. It was a very moving experience.
Written April 14, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

DiscerningJI
Hamilton, NY36 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2013 • Couples
A must see not because the building is special or of greater interest than average in terms of synagogue architecture or decor, but because it is a poignant reminder of Jewish times past...interesting history (lots of interesting photographs) of Bagdad Jews who came to Yangon and founded this place and the once thriving Jewish community that existed here...met the man who is singularly responsible for its upkeep and maintenance (he could use more donations)...he is more than willing to show visitors around...interesting, too, the building's current environment, in the heart of a Muslim neighborhood...would be hard to find if don't look carefully as the street-view is unremarkable...synagogue slightly recessed...go visit and be a part of history... sometimes, they can still pull off a minyan...
Written July 29, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AwesomeSEA
Toronto117 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2013 • Family
One can really sense the extend of the Jewish diaspora visiting this synagogue. So far from their homeland yet keeping the Jewish traditions alive. It never ceases to amaze me. The synagogue is simple with stained glass windows, a torah room and two levels for the worshippers which are all well kept up by Mr. Samuels . There is a brief description of the history of the current synagogue along with photos on the premises. Admission is free but donations are appreciated. A worthwhile visit to another Jewish outpost.
Written December 21, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Marshall K
Ajijic, Mexico221 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2013 • Family
According to the Planet Guide this Synagogue is "crumbling." Nothing could be further from the truth! It has been lovingly preserved and maintained. It was built in the Baghdadi style. In the holy cupboard are two Torah scrolls, embedded in wooden boxes, covered with hammered silver which is typical of Babylonian Jewish observance.
Most of Yangon's Jews emigrated after the founding of Israel and the withdrawal of the British, so there is not much active worship here. Records of the Jewish community, such as marriage documents, are stored here, so there is considerable historical importance on site.
The caretaker is mute, but manages to express himself well enough and is very accommodating to visitors. To enter the building you need to find the bell and be persistent as the caretaker is likely to be on the upper floors and you are on the street as there is a heavy
steel gate for security reasons. Visiting Jews can offer prayer there on Fridays and during holy days. Of interest are the many photographs of people like Ben Gurion and Abba Eban from
when they visited Rangoon. The caretaker will offer you literature about the history of the Synagogue and, should you desire, collect whatever you care to contribute.
Written October 14, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

lakeview7
Leeds UK8 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2011 • Friends
Under the Leadership of our Padre, Capt. Yaffe, we discovered the Synagogue in 1945. when Rangoon was captured from the Japanese Being in the RAF I organised a choir for the children, who had spent the occupation, with their parents in the Jungle. The Synagogue was boarded during the Japanese occupation, and the caretaker told the Japanese troops that it was an old warehouse, and consequently remained untouched.
Written February 12, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

dnaleciz
Moreno Valley, CA405 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018
A very beautiful Synagogue dating back to 1893, The interior is exceptional and well preserved from a bygone era. The gold railed bimah and the menorah lamps, as well as the decorated ceiling are a treasure from the past. It sad that the Burmese Jewish community no longer has a rabbi (departed in 1969) and the entire Jewish population of Myanmar is now down to 12 to 14 individuals. Thanks to visiting tourist this Synagogue remains open for the time being. The Synagogue is located on 26th Street and is not the easiest place to find. It may or may not be shown on maps of the area. Ask local for directions and most will get you in the right direction.
Written April 30, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Musmeah Yeshua Synagogue, Yangon (Rangoon)

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