State Agora
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The first agora was built in the 6th century B.C. and is buried below the present one. This square-shaped structure was where all the city's business was conducted.
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles85 reviews
Excellent
26
Very good
30
Average
27
Poor
2
Terrible
0

zuv
Bucharest, Romania33,359 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2020
One of the two public squares of the former ancient city. State Agora is the one next to the Odeon. Unfortunately, not much remains to be seen. Just a series of fragments of columns and a lot of scattered stone remains.
Written September 23, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BrakiWorldTraveler
Belgrade, Serbia18,060 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2020
Every Greek settlement had its own Agora which was the main trading place these days, something like today's market places. This one doesn't differ from others I saw across southeastern Europe.
The Ephesus one is set aside the iconic Library and it's a vast rectangular place with remnants of ancient houses and columns.
Written November 8, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

arpad_loboda
Subotica, Serbia278 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2013 • Couples
Nowadays only a field surrounded by columns but it must have been the busiest place in ancient times. Makes one think about the past.
Written August 5, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

msa23_2000
Chino Hills, CA1,420 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2021
It is right next
To the library and is an open market where foods and slaves were sold. It is a nice walkabout with some columns and a side view of the library but not much else.
Written April 5, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Carol A S
Marietta, GA4,177 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019
Ephesus was founded as a Greek trading port, and thrived for centuries. There were two agoras, one for commercial and one for state business. The commercial Agora was built in the 3rd century B.C (Hellenistic Period), then remodeled during reign of emperor Caracalla (211-217 C.E). The Agora was a square, 110m on each side, surrounded by columns. There were three gates: one from the front of the theater on the northeast and another opening to the harbor on the west. The third (southern) gate is called the Mazeus and Mithridates gate and led to the Library of Celsus. This monumental entrance was built in 4 or 3 BCE. The passages are vaulted, the front of the vault facing the Celsus Library is black marble, while the other side is white. Today we can still see a Latin inscription inlaid with bronze, translated as, "From the Emperor Caesar Augustus, the Son of God, the greatest of the priests, who was consul and tribune twenty twelve times, and the wife of Augustus, Livia, the son of Lucus, Marc Agrippa who was consul three times, emperor, and tribune six times, and the own daughter of Caesar Augustus; from Mazeus and Mitridiates to their master and the people”. The slaves Mazeus and Mitridíates were freed by the emperor Augustus. On the eastern side of the Agora was a two-storey Doric-style stoa (roofed colonnade) with a row of shops behind it, where food and other manufactured goods were sold. The north side of the Agora was open, and the other three sides were surrounded by a portico, which opened on to two rows of shops, small temples and offices. A sundial and a water-clock was in the center. Some restoration work is being done, and I had an impression of the vastness of the space as I wandered around fragments of columns and other architectural building elements. The site is fairly deserted now, and it was difficult to imagine it as a hub of activity when it was in its prime. The State Agora is one of many ruins in Ephesus, which is a UNESCO World heritage Site. The ruins are popular, so visiting early or late in the day helps avoid crowds. Sturdy shoes, water and a hat are recommended, as walking surfaces are uneven, and there is little shade. The Ephesus site is open Apr-Oct: 8am-7.30pm, and closes at 5.30pm Nov-Mar. There is an entry fee of ₺60 for adults; children are free. Parking is 10₺.
Written November 27, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

@JT3AZ
Phoenix, Arizona4,952 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2013 • Couples
There are two agoras at Ephesus, the first one you come to is the State Agora (this listing & poor rating) and is mostly in ruins. Most of the photos posted to this location are actually of the Agora Market Place which is after the Celsus Library. The later Agora (not listed on Trip Advisor and would be a Very Good rating) has lots of columns and some remaining buildings with decorations. One thing to notice near the State Agora is the terracotta drainage pipe sections; some are still in the ground, other pieces have been stacked nearby. Regardless, you'll see both agoras as you tour through Ephesus.
Written August 8, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Thomas V
Oakland, CA16,113 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Couples
Not a lot to see here, just some scattered stones. You have to use your imagination to get a view of the old market square in this part of town.
Written May 20, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LolaGo1
Washington DC, DC6,628 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2023 • Solo
Located next to the Celsus Library, this agora extended to a much bigger area. There are columns still remaining standing and intact.

I could just imagine how this agora or public market looked like in the old days and the types of products they were selling then.
Written June 6, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

N H
Newton Le Willows, UK4,414 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2022 • Couples
A nice large open space next to the library where you can walk around in relative peace. There are some column’s still standing but most have fallen or are missing altogether
Written January 29, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Raintree_Thailand
Bangkok, Thailand3,947 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019
A bit under-whelming after seeing the Celsus Library and the amphitheater, but still quite impressive and will be even more so when restoration advances further.
Written March 5, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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State Agora, Selcuk

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