Zeyrek Mosque
Zeyrek Mosque
4.5
About
Duration: 1-2 hours
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Tours & experiences
Explore different ways to experience this place.
The area
Address
Neighborhood: Fener & Balat
This sleepy and rather socially conservative area of Istanbul hosts a small but thriving Jewish community, the patriarchate of the Eastern Orthodox Church, and some of the most beautiful churches and Christian art in the world. Much of what’s most interesting to witness in Fener and Balat sits between the surviving ancient city walls of Constantinople and the serene shores of the Golden Horn. Despite the many splendid sights, historic attractions, stunning vistas, and warm Turkish welcome, the area remains largely unperturbed by the tourist trade that characterizes the atmosphere in nearby Sultanahmet and around the Grand Bazaar. Travelers that like to explore off the beaten track will reap big rewards for making the effort to visit this low-key part of town.
Reach out directly

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles57 reviews
Excellent
36
Very good
11
Average
8
Poor
2
Terrible
0

Chris K
Irkutsk, Russia4 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2014 • Business
The restoration of most of it has finished.I had visited it 10 years ago without restoration, it was almost a ruin. But it was still a monument! You could see the floor, the walls etc. Now it is a rebuilt brand new mosque, inside it has been painted like a regular modern mosque, you may not see the walls from inside and neither the floor. It is a great dissapointment. I do not recommend the visit.
Written February 17, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Darrellcocup
Warminster, UK192 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2015 • Couples
UNESCO eat your heart out. This isn't a restoration, it's a complete desecration. Don't bother visiting, what was once glorious is no more...
Written September 26, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Irina866
Almaty, Kazakhstan11 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2018 • Family
The best view of the Golden horn is from a cafe/bookstore behind Zeyrek mosque (Pantokrator monastery) , which is called Istanbul Kitapsici , while their menu was more extensive on paper but in reality you can get less, the main hook here is the view. Nothing can beat it ! We could even see tourists on Galata Tower's observation deck in detail... Make sure you have your kahvesi and camera ready...
Surprisingky the place doesnt come up in English google searches or guides. But it is popular with local Turkish tourists. You can see Suleymanie mosque in all its glory from this cafe.
Written August 28, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Andras
Budapest, Hungary75 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
This is one of the few Byzantine churches survived the Ottoman conquest. At least the building itself, as all of the original decorations of its interior has been lost long ago. Seen from the outside it is still a charming little church with its rough brick walls and small domes. There is a nice little garden behind its apses. From here you can enjoy the best view of the building as well as the beautiful panorama to the Golden Horn and the next hill with the huge Süleymaniye mosque on the top of it. There is also a good coffee bar that will possibly make you enjoy the view even more. It is not easy to find this place but it is worth to.
Written July 5, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

recepcalev
59 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018
very nice building originally was a church and now serving as a mosque nice view of the golden horn,
Written September 9, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Tessekurler
Luton, UK6 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Family
Beautiful Byzantine age mosque in a really down to earth area. Very friendly people. A lovely place for just sitting and enjoying the ambience and spirituality.
Written August 19, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

KAD
24 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2017
I accidentally discovered that the second largest standing Byzantine structure, after Hagia Sofia/Aya Sofya is the Zeyrek Mosque, formerly a double church and chapel of a Byzantine Monastery and that it was recently restored by the World Monument Fund. After taking a tram to Aksaray and walking up towards the main square and then down past the Valens Aqueduct, I found the church/mosque two streets over on the left side as you go towards the Golden Horn. You will need to ask locals for Zeyrek Camii (the mosque) and they will gladly help you.

The building is very large, beautiful, and is a functioning mosque which means it is open. It is free of charge and the building has been magnificently restored. The structure is obviously Byzantine by the architecture, columns, capitals, etc. There are no mosaics or Byzantine frescoes remaining, other than a hint near the main entrance. And I mean a hint. The rest is restored, early-Ottoman frescoes which are simple, gorgeous, and screaming to be photographed.

If you are into architecture, Byzantine and/or Ottoman history, this is a must-see.
Written July 20, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

pan0s_athens
Athens, Greece97 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2012 • Friends
Although the mosaics and frescoes were totally destroyed by the ottomans and the structure is in a sad state of neglect, still remains a wonderful sign of the Byzantine architecture and is actually the second largest church in Constantinople after Hagia Sophia.
Hopefully a restoration is ongoing....
Written September 24, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

aegean79
Istanbul - Turkey0 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
The building, being part of a large complex of its time, is the remains of the famous Pantocrator Monastery in Constantinople. When the city was taken by the Turks it was turned firstly to a madrasah(school), then became a mosque. The mosque and the district took its name from the man who gave lectures in the building at that time, Molla Zeyrek Efendi. The area spanning through Süleymaniye and Vefa used to be the city's education district until long time ago. Currently, the mosque is closed due to restoration.
Written August 5, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nazım H
Batum, Ajaria, Georgia3 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2013 • Friends
absolutely you will must to see this church. and it is last two Byzantine church..ıf you will come to church.you can see most ımportant things for Byzantine history.after that.. ıf you go to back of church . you can eat snak and drink something.. and while you will drink wine you can see very good view. mosque, beyazıt tower, galata tower and golden horn... by the way you can see brunette young person .. this people is drug dealer.. ıf you want to something you can buy .. :)))))
Written February 28, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Showing results 1-10 of 14
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

Zeyrek Mosque, Istanbul

All Istanbul HotelsIstanbul Hotel DealsLast Minute Hotels in Istanbul
All things to do in Istanbul
Day Trips in Istanbul
RestaurantsFlightsVacation RentalsTravel StoriesCruisesRental Cars