Lumpinee Boxing Stadium
Lumpinee Boxing Stadium
4
Tuesday
6:30 PM - 10:30 PM
Friday
6:30 PM - 10:30 PM
Saturday
4:30 PM - 10:30 PM
About
Thailand’s best-known boxing stadium hosts traditional Muay Thai matches every Tuesday, Friday and Saturday. Expect to pay around THB2000 for ring-side seats to the kickboxing-type matches.
Duration: 1-2 hours
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Admission tickets
from $48.88
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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles549 reviews
Excellent
242
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67
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28

Steve W
Thornaby on Tees, UK14 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
We arrived slightly late but were ushered away from the box office where the tickets were 1650 baht or even cheaper. We got ringside seats but the view is terrible. DO NOT be coerced into going VIP ringside its a con.
We paid 2000 baht each, only seen 3 fights as the last 3 were cancelled. Total rip off. Avoid.
Written March 24, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Natasha B
Bangkok, Thailand8 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2024 • Couples
Women, fight. Loved it! The most exceptional experience! The fights ranged from young boys to young men. Young women too. Nearly 4 hours and I enjoyed every minute of it. Televised, we saw a mixture of boxing and martial arts. I was so happy that I decided to go. It was a mixed crowd of tourists, foreigners and families with children, and (mostly Thai) crowd on the upper levels of the stadium. Atmosphere was much more wild and exciting! Would go again and again. Can't wait to watch more women fights.

   
Written February 19, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

cobie1982
Greater London, UK7 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2023 • Family
Totally empty and lacking in atmosphere. We were given free tickets through a friend and now understand why. Alsp, the new stadium is FAR from the city centre, expect to spend 2 hours in a taxi to get to this empty building. Spend the money and go to Raja instead.
Written December 23, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Craig M
Porto, Portugal3,055 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2016 • Solo
I had a nightmare of a journey to get there, but I enjoyed some exciting Muay Thai (Thai kick-boxing) at Lumpinee Stadium on Friday evening.

There are two large boxing stadiums in Bangkok -Rajadamnern (a.k.a. Ratchadamnoen) and Lumpinee. There are fights at Rajadamnern every Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday whilst Lumpinee has events every Tuesday, Friday and Saturday. On a previous visit to Bangkok, I went to the Rajadamnern Stadium, so this time I wanted to try Lumpinee. Lumpinee is further out of the city so would take longer to reach, but I had no idea just how much longer it would take!

The Friday night event starts at 6.30pm and ends about 11.00pm. I knew from my previous visit to Rajadamnern that the early fights are often the least entertaining, and that 4.5 hours of kick-boxing can be a long night. There were nine bouts scheduled for the event (you can check on the stadium's website), so I decided to miss the first two or three and didn’t leave my condo until after 6.30pm.

I caught the BTS Skytrain to Mo Chit, at the northern end of the Sukumvit line. From Mo Chit I would have to catch a taxi the rest of the way to the stadium.When I got out of the station about 7.20pm, I saw that the traffic heading north was bumper-to-bumper and wasn’t moving. It would have been pointless trying to get a taxi that was stuck in that mess, so I went to the southbound side of the road and was able to get a taxi willing to take me to the stadium. The driver suggested that we take the highway, to which I agreed. I soon realised that this meant I was responsible for the 70 bahts toll-fee (on top of the taxi fare). Whilst the highway may have been a bit less congested than the regular road, it wasn’t by much. All three lanes heading in our direction were congested with stop and start traffic. Meanwhile, the lanes going in the opposite direction were almost empty. What I had expected to be a relatively short taxi ride ended up consuming two hours of my evening! Fortunately, the taxi meter seems to primarily count kilometers travelled, rather than time spent, as the final fare for two hours and about 18km was 250 baht (less than $8) plus the 70 baht toll fee. There had been no sign of road-works or a traffic accident, so I can only assume that Friday night traffic is always gridlocked going out of town like that (and perhaps every weekday is the same). Had I known before departure that my journey would have entailed a two-hour taxi ride, I surely would not have bothered.

It was 9.25pm by the time I walked up the steps to the stadium and the 6th bout was already underway. I had missed the Thailand Super Bantamweight (122lbs) Championship bout (bout 5) because of the lengthy taxi ride! But I knew that the main bout was listed as bout 7, so there would still be something worth watching.

As I exited the taxi, one of the stadium staff (in an orange shirt and carrying a clipboard) approached me with a view to selling me a ticket. She advised me of the ticket options: first class 2,000 baht, second class 1,500 baht, and third class 1,000 baht. I’d already decided that I wanted to be in the cheap seats with the locals. I had sat in the 2,000 baht ringside seating at Rajadamnern and this time I wanted to be amongst the atmosphere of the betting locals. I told the staff member that I wanted the third class ticket and she told me that it was a championship night and was very busy – the third class section was full with little space available. Undeterred, I told her that was where I wanted to sit. With a disgusted look, she waved me away towards the ticket counter.I hadn’t moved more than a couple of feet when a second lady approached me and tried her best to upsell me to the ringside seats, telling me how busy it was in the third class section. I suspect that the staff are on commission to sell the higher-priced tickets. I stuck to my guns, bought the 1,000 baht third class ticket and was pointed to the entrance door.

I hadn’t eaten dinner and had initially intended to eat some food outside the stadium. However, due to the delay in the taxi and the fact that the 6th bout was already underway, I just wanted to get inside. After a quick purchase of a bag of Lays potato chips (crisps) and a can of Chang beer, I headed upstairs and found myself in the midst of an energetic crowd in the packed-out third class section. There are no individual seats in third class, just concrete steps or bleachers on which to sit/stand. And they all seemed to be full. I walked up the steps to the very back, from where I was able to see over the shorter Thais standing in front of me. It didn’t take long to realise that I’d made the correct decision to come to the third class section.

The 6th bout was still underway and it was a very competetive match. The crowd was loud and energetic, shouting for their favourites and loudly acknowledging knee-strikes to the abdomen with shouts of “Eeee.” There was plenty of action outside the ring also, as men in the crowd gestured to each other, signalling their willingness to bet and seeking others willing to take the bet. I have no idea what any of the hand signals mean, but betting on the fights is clearly an integral part of attending these events. And it adds to the atmosphere to be amongst it.

The main bout was full of action and ended with a second round TKO after some vicious elbow strikes. With the main event concluded, about half of the spectators left the stadium, with two bouts still to come.

Bout 8 was a 107lb bout that started out slowly but became more exciting as it went along.

The final bout saw the lightest competitors of the night at 100lbs. There wasn’t much action in the first round and it was already close to 11.00pm. Concerned about the return journey, I decided to leave before the last bout ended.

When I got outside, I was soon approached by a taxi driver offering his services. But he quoted me 300 baht to get to Mo Chit. When I declined, he dropped his price to 250. That was what I’d paid for the two hour ride through horrific traffic, that I assumed wouldn’t still be a problem at 11.00pm. I declined the offer, telling the guy that I was going to get a metered taxi. He assured me that I wouldn’t be able to find one at that time of night. Oh really? I walked about 25 metres down the road, past the entrance to the stadium, and saw that taxis were pulling up for waiting passengers. It didn’t take long to secure a taxi that would take me to Mo Chit using the meter. That return leg covered 20km (he mistakenly took me to the Mo Chit shopping centre first, instead of the BTS station), lasted about 35 minutes and cost 165 baht. The taxi got me to Mo Chit station at 11.40pm, about 30 minutes before the last train departed.

Whilst I only saw two complete bouts and two partial bouts, I enjoyed my visit to Lumpinee Stadium but I would have reservations about going back for an evening event due to the horrendous traffic on week nights. Lumpinee’s Saturday events run from 2.00pm to 8.30pm so would likely be a better option to avoid heavy traffic.
Written October 1, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jon L
New York City, NY35 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2015 • Couples
If you are a fan of Muay Thai then it's not something you should pass up, even if it's not the original location. Here are some pointers that I wish someone had posted. Rajadamnern stadium is also the better stadium now for quality of fighters.

1) You will be pushed to sit ringside with the rest of the "farang." This is not a hustle, just go for it. I wanted to sit in the 2nd tier (Which you are free to move to) but when I saw some other tourists amid the gambling Thai men, I realized why they try to keep things separate. They seemed very upset with the foreigners being seated there.

2) Do NOT try to gamble with the Thais. The rules are complicated and the betting is ferocious. They will not be happy you are interfering and will just look to rip you off for trying.

3) They take credit card, but will charge you a small fee for tickets. It worked out to around three dollars US. Not a big deal.

4) They have a nice little food court outside

5) Just take a cab since it's difficult to get to with public transport. I went from Bang Rak district we paid about 400 baht each way.
Written May 1, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Skipper S
Beijing, China106 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2015 • Solo
Lumpinee (now out by Dong Muang Airport, don't go the old location if you have an old guidebook) is the premier Thai Boxing arena anywhere in the world. It is a must see location for martial arts enthusiasts.

Suggestions for a better experience:
1) Don't get a first class ticket. Folding chairs aren't meaningfully more comfortable than the stands, and the 2000 Baht 2nd class seats that have a much better view of the fights (though you are much less likely to get mouth guard in your lap). Third class is too high though.
2) If you are not Thai and you find yourself surrounded by Thai, do yourself a favor and relocate. Almost everyone there is there for gambling, and if you aren't gambling you are in the way. The men taking book may express their displeasure in your interference in a multitude of ways, though I have never witnessed violence. The gambling is seriously hard core, more than at any other arena I have visited, and it has an effect on the fighters, as well.
3) Please obey the signs and don't bring in guns, knives, or hand grenades (wait, what?). But there are currently no metal detectors to stop this, thus the advice in 2).
4) There may be exhibition standard boxing before the Thai boxing. Don't think you are in the wrong place.
5) There is no scoring in Thai boxing during the first and last round, which is why the gamblers are only really excited in the middle 3. Most scoring comes from knees to the torso, no matter how ineffectual. Knockouts, which are exciting to farang and the boxers that achieve them, are mostly a disappointment to the gamblers, unless they happen in the 5th round.
6) Do arrive before 6 pm and eat with the locals. Internet is available at the coffee shop in the back.
7) Expect to be done around 10 pm, so you will have time to catch a taxi back to the BTS. Either require the driver to use the meter, or don't pay over 200 baht. They will happily charge 300 or 400 if you let them!

If you are making a day of the area, be sure to visit the Armed Forces Museum (dedicated to all Thai military and police, closes at 3 pm) and the Royal Thai Air Force Museum (reasonable collection of planes, helicopters, and a few pieces intended to stop them from flying. Closes at 4, though I could have sworn the sign at the front said 5). Additionally, if you came up by BTS, then before you head up to the other locations the Chatuchak weekend open market is a fantastic place to waste a few hours (it is huge) and save a lot of money on all the stuff you see being sold to tourists everywhere in Thailand (Southwest of the BTS station, with a large free park intervening. Closes at 9 pm).
Written February 8, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mika H
Helsinki1 contribution
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Couples
Just got broken heart there.. Thais pay 750,- Farangs 4000,-
Not all foreigners are rich !! Hope some day this gonna chance. I can understand that street vendors do that , but the new stadium is own by Thai Army, who is supporting this..

Never go back there and I hope that other foreigners also stop accepting this kind kind of behavior.

They are just ruining beautiful sport there.
Written June 6, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ajeancompton
Bois d'Amont, France80 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2011 • Couples
Don't make the same mistake that we did of getting tricked into buying "VIP" tickets for 2,000 Baht ($67usd) - this is basically just the price they charge you for being a tourist. It's just a few feet away from regular seating, and the only difference is instead of sitting on a hard bench, you're sitting on a hard chair. You get one free drink with your purchase, but as beers are like $1 there you can just purchase them yourself. I would recommend buying a regular ticket and sitting with the crowd- the betting gets furious and is an experience you shouldn't miss!
Written May 18, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Aranslam
Denpasar, Indonesia2 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2015 • Friends
Do not give them your money. This adventure was a complete waste of time for the party of three I was traveling with. Basically, after going through all the effort to get to this new location, people instantly came up to us and were offering us exorbitant prices 2500 baht (ringside) 2000 (2nd tier) and 1500 (3rd tier) for the fights. We then went to the stalls and there were differentiated sections for Thai people and *Foreigners* where the price difference was noticable for each of the ticket types. For example 250 for a Thai person compared to 1500 for a foreigner for the 3d tier ticket; 540 vs 2500 for ringside. Not being prepared to pay 250 dollars for a couple muay thai fights I tried to get the cheaper tickets, but was just shrugged off and pushed to the *foreigner* section in the next stall by the employees that are the least bilingual people in the building. I then went to check what it looked like inside whilst I was going to the bathroom expecting a crowded and famous Lumpinee Stadium, but to my surprise the stadium was largely empty on this Friday night with a bunch of foreigners sitting in the ringside and 130+ thai people in the stands of this large stadium. It was clear they are trying to rip off foreigners and this was enervating, to the point that the three of us decided this is not the original experience of Muay Thai anymore, just the commercial outcome of what once was special and traditional. We then left on the long journey by taxi back into Bangkok.
Written June 20, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jani Š
Coron, Philippines2 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2017 • Couples
The issue is not only the remote location that is 18km from last BTS station Mo Chit. This require dealing with taxi drivers that do not want to use taxi meter and want to charge 2000 Bath on hand for the fare. You can by-pass them by using Bus 26 that require some more waiting as it is not so friquent. They run from 06am-10pm and they will bring you to the bus stop on the street opposite to the entrence to the stadium for 17 Bath. We have arrived there after appr. 2 hours travel time.

3 types of tickets were offered: 250 for standing area, 1500 for seats and 2000 for rind-side seats.

They did not want to sell us the standing area tickets as they are reserved for Thai people. As foreigner you are forced to buy seat ticket for 1500 min. As Lumpinee Stadium is managed by Royal Thai Army I do feel that Royal Thai Army does not treats foreigner fair and equal.

We will never go again.
Written January 15, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Lumpinee Boxing Stadium - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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