Wat Mangkon Kamalawat
Wat Mangkon Kamalawat
4
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles154 reviews
Excellent
43
Very good
71
Average
37
Poor
3
Terrible
0

Arm Pasakorn
Kanchanaburi, Thailand4 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2021 • Family
On Chinese New Year, my family and I went to visit this place. They traveled from Kanchanaburi after having finished paying homage to their ancestors and traveled all the way to here. and have done many activities together within the family This year's Chinese New Year, even with the covids, we're all here happily together.
Written October 22, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

leshy-travel
Bydgoszcz, Poland418 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022 • Solo
Wat Mangkon Kamalawat is the most important Chinese Buddhist temple in Bangkok's Chinatown. Was founded as a Mahayana Buddhist temple in 1871 or 1872. It is characterized by classical Chinese architecture style. The temple is close to MRT station and easy to find. If you are planning a trip to Bangkok, it is worth visiting this place. I have been there several times and each visit turned out to be very interesting.
Written March 25, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

T H
Los Angeles, CA140 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2015 • Solo
This is a good place to see if you are in the area, but I did not find it to be a place I would want to take a long ride to see by itself. It is a busy, working temple. Compared to some of the other Bangkok wonders, it is not a highlight, but it was not designed to be a tourist attraction, nor is it its purpose.
Written March 5, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TJim60
3,315 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018 • Couples
With all the beautiful wats in Bangkok, what makes this one so special?

This is by most accounts the most important Chinese Buddhist wat in Thailand. Chinese immigrants played and continue to play an important role in the economic, political, and other aspects of Thai life. You can get a sense of the historic and present role of Chinese origin Thais in the life of the country from a visit.

Thais follow the Theravada (Hinayana) school of Buddhism. Chinese (Koreans and Japanese) the Mahayana school. So you'll get a chance to see the differences. Not only in design but also in practice.

The wat is built and beautifully decorated in typical Chinese style so a visit offers the opportunity to contrast with the Thai style.

WMK is located in a particularly "rich" tourist site location. Wat Traimit (Golden Buddha) is in the neighborhood. Wat Khanikaaphon, the Leng Bua Ia Temple (non Buddhist Chinese), the covered street market, the large Chinese style gate to Yaowarat neighborhood (Bangkok's Chinatown) as well as the impressive Guan Im (Kwan Yi) shrine on Yaowarat Road with the main statue dating from the 1200s. There is also a Taoist temple in the area. So you can combine a visit to Wat Traimit with some or all of these other sites.

Finished in early 1870s, the wat is build in Southern Chinese style. Its name means Dragon Lotus Temple --an official name bestowed by Rama V. Its Chinese name is Wat Leng Noei Yi .

As you enter you come upon the main altar with its three Buddhas. These are from left to right, Amitabha (the key Buddha in the Pure Land School and lord of Sukhvati, the Western Pure Land realm), Shakyamuni (the Buddha who taught in Nepal and India), and Bhaisajyaguru (the Medicine Buddha Lord of Lapis Lazuli Realm --somewhere in the East). Because this is a Chinese temple, in conformity with Chinese building practice, the main entrance faces South so the placement of Amitabha and the Medicine Buddha are geographically correct.

As this is a Chinese wat, the MB is depicted in the iconic Chinese pose - holding a pagoda symbolizing the 10,000 buddhas. In Tibetan Buddhism, the iconic representation is a buddha with bluish skin holding a bowl of healing nectar in the left hand and the stem of a myrobalan in his right.

There wat includes three subsidiary shrines.

One for Guan Im (Kwan Yin), one for the founder of the temple. and one to a saint. Guan Im is depicted in iconic forms - with 10,000 arms (metaphorically) to assist all beings, and seated holding a vessel containing healing/soothing water.

If you're in Bangkok during Chinese New Year or the Chinese Vegetarian Festival, the wat will be very busy. You'll get an idea of the importance of this wat and the Chinese Thai community.
Written March 24, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

summerofscience
20 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2015 • Solo
Wat Mangkon Kamalawat is unique for Bangkok as it is the largest Chinese Buddhist temple in the city. It is a Mahayana Buddhist temple built in Chinese style circa 1871. It is accessible by a gate just off of Charoen Krung Rd. and its Chinese-style edifice makes it a difficult site to miss. The temple is less likely to have tourists and mostly will be filled with local Chinese Thai Buddhists who follow the Mahayana tradition. The distinct cultural and aesthetic differences are between Theravada and Mahayana Buddhism make this site very a unique one in Bangkok. As far as sites in Chinatown go Wat Mangkon conveys well the culture of the Chinese community that have long had a presence in this area.
Written June 19, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Lawrence W
Khon Kaen, Khon Kaen, Thailand137 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2012 • Couples
Wat Mangkon Kamalawat is situated in the heart of Bangkok's Chinatown, known as Yaowarat, and is worth a visit if you are in the area shopping for Chinese goodies or gold.

This temple has been around since 1871 and has a large amount of religious statues that local Chinese and Thais pray to.

There is a "No Photos" sign inside the temple area, but I did manage to get off a few snaps.
Written December 1, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Arnt Olav
Sigdal Municipality, Norway473 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2017 • Couples
The largest and most important Chinese Buddhist temple in Bangkok. I go there at Chinese New Year, and it was very crowded but worth a visit. Difficult to explain the atmosphere and the smells, you need to feel it by yourself...
Written January 28, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

KrisprachantP
Bangkok, Thailand44 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2014 • Friends
The temple, situated in the middle of Chinatown, is quiet during late morning, allowing tourists to explore the corners, sculptures, and passages. Arrive before lunch, spend some time here before heading out to try famous street vendors in Chinatown. Or you can visit during weekends and enjoy watching the crowds.
Written December 18, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

F A I R Y *
Chonburi, Thailand24 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2017
Always good and nice design. Our family like this place much. We're go to pray and make wish. Hope you great at all.
Written August 28, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Will G
Reading, UK604 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2016 • Solo
Part of your walk through China Town must be by here. Wonderful place to stumble upon and snap a few pictures. I little piece of scenery in the middle of the busy China town.
Written December 20, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Wat Mangkon Kamalawat, Bangkok

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