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Zemaiciu Plentas 73, Kaunas 47435 Lithuania
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Vilnius-Riga Sightseeing Tour Bus
Cultural Tours

Vilnius-Riga Sightseeing Tour Bus

9 reviews
Take a trip from Vilnius to Riga and on the way learn about the history and people of two countries. Our knowledgeable local guides take a small group, maximum of 8 people, for a fun filled 12 hour road trip through Lithuania and Latvia.<br><br>Get a glimpse of Lithuanian life outside of Vilnius. You’ll visit Kaunas, the second biggest city in Lithuania, with beautiful churches and picturesque Old Town. We’ll discover the Hill of Crosses that is a famous pilgrimage destination and a site of resistance against Soviet occupation.<br><br>After crossing the Latvian border you’ll be amazed by the Rundāle Palace that is considered the grandest stately home in the Baltics and a true gem of Baroque architecture and of South-Latvian countryside. Before reaching Riga we’ll visit the monumental Salaspils Memorial Ensemble to victims of Fascism to learn about the II World War in the Baltic countries.
$82.01 per adult
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&tilly wrote a review Jul 2020
Bratislava, Slovakia135 contributions
+1
You can walk around the place even if the musem is closed. It takes at least 30 min to see everything just from the outside - and it’s nice to go after hours - less crowded and you get to see it anyway. The area is large, clean and cared for. From the top of the fort (it looks like a little hill) there is a nice view over the city, though it’s a very sad place, knowing that tens of thousands souls ceased the exist here, and the remains lay under your feet. P.S. Dogs are not allowed at all, and there are no trash bins on the site.
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Date of experience: July 2020
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mer20172017 wrote a review Jul 2020
Helsinki, Finland23 contributions2 helpful votes
Decided to visit Ninth Forth, even though didin’t plan on it at first. It was definitely worth visiting. I would recommend it!
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Date of experience: July 2020
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Vanda wrote a review Feb 2020
Bratislava, Slovakia75 contributions3 helpful votes
Very strong experience. Sad place with a death smell in it. It’s really big area with 2 buildings and one memorial. The rooms are original.
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Date of experience: February 2020
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Hawk470 wrote a review Feb 2020
Norwalk, Connecticut2,552 contributions294 helpful votes
+1
The Ninth Fort, completed by Tsar Nicholas II in 1913 as the final piece in the Kaunas defensive perimeter, tells a tragic history of endless oppression. The walls cry out in anguish from Communist torture and the courtyards and surrounding fields echo from the streams of Fascist gunfire slaughtering men, women and children. Political undesirables under the Tsar, prisoners sentenced to hard labor between wars, Socialists, Liberals, Intelligentsia, Lithuanian political prisoners and clergy readied for shipment to the Gulag under the Soviets; all experienced the wrath of their oppressors within these walls. Hundreds, perhaps thousands, from its completion on the eve of World War I until the Nazi conquest in 1941 and the unspeakable mass murder which followed. And after the war, new rounds of Soviet oppression. Under German occupation, Jews from Lithuania and elsewhere in Europe were lined up and murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators here. Row upon row, day after day. 45,000-50,000, largely from the Kaunas Ghetto, but also decorated German-Jewish veterans of World War I and Jews from as far away as France; nearly 10,000 on October 29, 1941 alone, including more than 4,200 children. Who can fathom such evil? How can one make sense of the many tragedies permeating one place? Perhaps it can only be expressed through art. Designed by A. Ambraziunas and erected in 1984, the massive twisted and tormented metal memorial sculpture reaching skyward from the killing ground embodies the boundless pain and perhaps offers a modicum of grace through its commemoration of those who met their tragic fates here. The Ninth Fort contains two main exhibit structures – the museum building and the fort. Each tells several stories – all informative, most moving and profusely illustrated with photographs, installations and text in Lithuanian and English. In the museum building you learn about the fort itself, and then the mass deportations, murders and terror of the first Soviet occupation of Lithuania 1940-1941 as a result of the non-aggression pact between Hitler and Stalin and the post-Second World War Soviet reoccupation of Lithuania. According to the exhibit, more than 115,000 Lithuanians were deported to Siberia during the first and second occupations and about half returned to Lithuania. The Nazi imprisonment of Lithuanian political leaders and others is described in this section as well. The fort itself contains recreations of the prison cells and exhibits about what happened to various groups deported here, including the Kaunas Ghetto in Viljampole and its liquidation, the “Great Action” of October 29, 1941 when thousands were murdered, and Convoy 73 -- the May 15, 1944 deportation of 878 French Jews, including 66 teenagers, from the Drancy concentration camp outside Paris to the Baltic states. 600 were unloaded in Kaunas and murdered in the Ninth Fort. The photos of the murdered and the captions almost bring them back to life. Some of their final inscriptions, as well as those of other prisoners, are still visible on the walls. 22 of those deported from Drancy survived. The fort also has an extensive exhibit about the Chiune Sugihara and other Righteous Among the Nations – Lithuanians and from other European countries -- who saved Jews from their horrific fate, as well as the post-war lives of some who survived Outside the exhibit area, you pass through the prison courtyard lined with Kaunas native Nehemia Arbit Blatas’ astounding and gripping bronzes of the stages of the Holocaust and make your way to the vast killing field where 50,000 are buried in mass graves. From there, you approach A. Ambraziunas’ monumental memorial sculpture. If you are fortunate, as we were, you may be lucky enough to see everything under glorious Baltic clouds. They do not diminish the memory of those murdered, which is vitally important to keep in mind, but the sky and the clouds will show that there still is beauty in the world; even one in which so much evil has found a home.
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Date of experience: October 2019
6 Helpful votes
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Deividas M wrote a review Nov 2019
Watford, United Kingdom25 contributions4 helpful votes
It is historical place, museum. This place was funded, and built by the Russian Czar as a guarding tower with the secret tunnels, then was used as a concentration camp by Nazis to kill war prisoners, mainly Jews, and now is a museum
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Date of experience: November 2019
1 Helpful vote
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