Jewish Cemetery (Cmentarz Zydowski)

Jewish Cemetery (Cmentarz Zydowski)

Jewish Cemetery (Cmentarz Zydowski)
4.5
About
Established in 1799-1806, this scenic and nostalgic cemetery features marble and sandstone tombstones called masebas, which reveal delicately carved symbols and ornaments, and the symbolic grave of the famous writer and teacher Janusz Korczak (1878-1942) who died in the gas chambers of Aushwitz.
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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4.5
520 reviews
Excellent
325
Very good
139
Average
38
Poor
9
Terrible
9

Danny K
Manchester, UK34 contributions
Jul 2022
A thoroughly thought-provoking visit to the cemetery brings forth centuries of tales and pious men and women struggling to lead a normal jewish life in Poland. The great talmidei chachomim buried here make the visit a must. A sombre almost serene atmosphere together with the deep enchanting woods lend itself to an experience difficult to forget.
Written January 8, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

EllenChr
Oslo, Norway2,381 contributions
Sep 2022 • Couples
Just one tiny entrance and the doors looks like their closed and Re not inviting. But as you enter the place is quite beautiful. Part of the cementary looks abandonned and delapidated, others are well kept. Fascinating how some of the tomb stones are leaning over without falling.
Written September 2, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

RTWVer
40 contributions
Nov 2018 • Couples
The entrance to the Jewish cemetery is right on the south-east corner of the site.
Men are advised they must cover their heads, on the entry sign, and I imagine - though not a theologian - the same may well apply to women. Before entering the cemetery, take a moment, at the south-facing corner of the exterior wall, where you will find an explainer plaque in Polish and English, pointing out that you are looking at a section of the old ghetto wall. The entrance is a double-door, wrought iron gate, and going through that, you will see the ticket office to your left. Go to the hatch and you can purchase entry and guides. To your right is a map of the cemetery, and a listing of notable people’s memorials as well as those to the mass graves, including those of fighters killed in the ghetto rising of 1943. It is not entirely clear, but then the site is rather large. If you are looking for a particular grave, I would enquire at the office. The cemetery itself is a place you could spend an hour, or a day, dependent on whether you want to wander the uneven paths, thread the gaps between the memorial and grave stones, or take it all in with a brief look about. It is tumble-down in places, though restoration and conservation work is going on year-round, these days. But the tumble-down appearance gives it a greater power, to me. For where there is the newly-restored memorial to a rabbi, there are the other graves stones, some that protrude like broken-off teeth, to men, women and children who lived, it seems to me, just as well as they might in such dark times, and are as worthy of your attention and regard as the notables listed on the main map information board. All buried and remembered here, lived their lives, as best they could, and lie here - or are remembered here in this place - as equals. As you come through the entrance, head right, past the map board, to the Eisner/Landau families’ memorial. Pause there to look at the weather-worn photographed faces of the dead children, taken away to be murdered by the Nazis, simply for who they were. Then carry on to the left, and look at the memorial to Janusz Korczak. He was an author and paediatrician who ran a Warsaw orphanage in the occupation, from 1940-42. When the Nazis ordered all the orphans deported to the death camps, he refused to abandon them, and led them on foot, to the trains. He told them stories, so they would not be scared, though he must have been terrified. He was murdered by the Nazis at Treblinka. Nearby, on a wall, there is an inscription, which is worth all of us measuring our lives against: “My aim is to love and be righteous, instead of being loved and adored.”
Written November 22, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

lizzyillustration
Jerusalem, Israel206 contributions
Feb 2015 • Business
Since 1806, this simply astounding cemetery (one of the largest in Europe) has been the final resting place of Warsaw's Jewish community. Who were they?
Artists , writers, actors social reformers, doctors, rabbis, teachers, scientists merchants, historians , soldiers, rich, poor, religious, secular- a microcosm of Polish Jewish life in one place .
What language did the Jews of Warsaw speak? You'll see tombs in Yiddish Hebrew and Polish. You'll see simply beautiful examples of Jewish funerary art. Among the graves you’ll see the graves of Ludwig Zamenhof, the man who invented the international language of Esperanto, the beautiful graves of the great Yiddish writers, a memorial to Janusz Korczak and the children of his orphanage .You will also see a heartbreaking mass grave of those who perished in the horrific Warsaw ghetto , plus symbolic graves and memorials to those who’s earthly remains are elsewhere- ashes scattered in Treblinka Auschwitz and Majadanek.
One experiences many emotions in this quiet peaceful place- wonder, pride, exhilaration- but above all a deep overwhelming feeling of loss and intense pity of the Nazi annihilation of the great Jewish culture of Poland. Visit this cemetery to pay tribute to them all.
Written March 18, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Tirza
Los Angeles, CA49 contributions
Aug 2019
The cemetery in Warsaw still stands with its stones reminding us of a thriving Jewish community that existed in Warsaw for many generations. It is hard to believe it was all but gone.
Written August 27, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

marcopolopaloalto
Palo Alto, CA1,068 contributions
Oct 2015 • Business
Our group visited the these stones to remember and see the community that was once here. Before WW11 Warsaw had a thriving Jewish life. These stones speak about those who lived here because they not only memorialize their names but they give testament to what was important in this community - being charitable.
The silence that surrounds this cemetery is also deafening as well over one million Jews we're killed, their lives shortened, by the extermination camps in Poland. Those buried here, mostly before the war have the benefit of a stone and a name.
There is also a statue of the beloved - dia.org/wiki/Janusz_Korczak - Translate this page
Janusz Korczak, a famous, pediatrician, who began an orphanage who refused to be separated from the Jewish children he cared for. "Korczak was forced to gather together the two hundred children in his care. He led them with quiet dignity on that final march through the ghetto streets to the train that would take them to "resettlement in the East" -the Nazi euphemism for the death camp Treblinka".
Written October 31, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

enellenotticomequest
Bologna4 contributions
Aug 2014 • Friends
We found out late on that it was suppose to be for free. There are some cheaters I guess, that went directly in the office that is at the entrance and ask us money. Very very bad, it made our experience just not as it was supposed to be.
Written August 23, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

DONNA S
Portland, OR131 contributions
Jul 2013 • Couples
You have to take a tram from the center. It wasn't long. My husband and I always go to cemeteries. They are always serene and peaceful. You can also tell a lot about a culture by the way they treat their dead. I have never paid to get into one - even in the Jewish eastern European ones that are memorials to the Holocaust. The price was cheap but still something seemed wrong about paying to get in to a cemetery. I was expecting a normal cemetery. What I found was an weed infested, overgrown shrubbery disgrace. It looks like they haven't even tried to keep the place in shape. My husband said that maybe they were trying to keep it looking like it did when the Germans got done with it. Plus there aren't many Jewish people left in Warsaw to take care of it. In my mind, I thought it was disrespectful to the dead. Especially since they charge to get in. Saying that...it was a very pretty with all the trees and the huge amount of tombstones. They were very old and crumbling. A lot of stones were knocked over. That happens with age and is understandable. In a strange way, the place was beautiful. Photography people could spend all day there. What was worth seeing for me was the more modern memorials to the war dead. The one for children really got me. It is worth going to but just be prepared that it isn't well taken care of.
Written July 18, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

cmnt24
Northern California54 contributions
Jun 2012 • Couples
Our daughter lives and works in Warsaw, and this is one of the first places to which she takes her visitors. She has many pictures of the cemetery just before All Saints' Day, an important day to the Polish people. Yes, November 1 is a Christian event and this is a Jewish cemetery. But the Poles remember all their dead on this national holiday. Her 8th graders take a field trip each year to honor this small reminder of a population of people now largely missing from Warsaw; hence the reason the cemetery is in so much disrepair, we were told. We went on a June afternoon, so the area was leafy and green. I would love to see it at other times of the year. The disrepair and brokenness actually contributes to the profound reality of despair in Warsaw during WWII. The entrance to the cemetery is from a busy street, simply a door and a sign along a long concrete wall, and is VERY easy to miss. I would like to return again to wander among the graves and toppled stones. Next time I would not have a schedule, and I would bring along something to sit on and older clothes soaked in bug spray to wander the brambles. This is truly sacred space.
Written February 27, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

travel-till-I-drop
Tucson, AZ170 contributions
Apr 2012 • Friends
I went to the Jewish Cemetery with my adult daughter. I wanted to see if I could find my grandfather's grave. He died in Warsaw before the war. The black steel gate to the cemetery was closed but we turned the knob and pushed it open. We were shocked at the huge number of headstones among the trees in the cemetery. There are over 150,000 graves there. Some parts are more cared for than others. Many parts are a total jumble of tilting and fallen stones. It is a moving experience. So many people once lived in Warsaw and contributed to life and culture there! There is a datebase for the cemetery where you can enter names and find sector, row and grave number. The paths between sections are extremely hard to discern. The Cemetery office sells a little schematic map that helps make some sense of the place. We spent about 2 hours searching...despite assurances from cemetery workers that we did not have a hope of finding the grave...we found it!! Died 1932!
Written April 3, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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Jewish Cemetery (Cmentarz Zydowski), Warsaw

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