Galicia Jewish Museum
Galicia Jewish Museum
4.5
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Monday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
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About
The Galicia Jewish Museum exists to commemorate the victims of the Holocaust and to celebrate the Jewish culture of Polish Galicia, presenting Jewish history from a new perspective.
Suggested duration
2-3 hours
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Admission tickets
from $4.96
All you need to step foot in the door.
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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Kazimierz
See what other travelers are saying
  • james123416
    Porto, Portugal16 contributions
    Incredible- one of the best museums I’ve visited in a long time
    Incredible museum- cannot recommend this highly enough. All visitors to krakow should visit. The temporary exhibition was so moving and well delivered, as we learnt the story of Richard Ores, a young Jewish man who lived in Krakow and experienced the Holocaust first hand before moving to the US. This exhibit raised such important questions and considerations. The main exhibitions were outstandingly well done- I just cannot express how impressed I was by this museum. I felt I learnt so much about Jewish history and culture in Krakow- before, during and after the atrocities committed by the nazis. You must visit this museum.
    Traveled as a couple
    Written August 8, 2022
  • JL
    6 contributions
    Great museum and gift shop
    Great museum. I visited in September 2022, when they had a photo exhibit called "Rediscovering Traces of Memory." It's a great history of Polish Jewry prior to the Holocaust. They also have a very nice gift shop.
    Written September 10, 2022
  • PoppaP54
    Middletown, Delaware351 contributions
    Small But Mighty
    My wife and I, along with another couple, visited this museum while in the Former Jewish Quarter, We were fortunate to be the only guests in the facility at the time, and had a young guide all to our own. The combination of the visual displays, and the easily read labels, coupled with the guide's expertise and added emphasis, we found ourselves movingly educated, and emotionally touched. It is a small facility, with a potentially big impact.
    Written November 1, 2021
These reviews are the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor checks reviews for fraud.
Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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4.5
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502petles
Koper, Slovenia87 contributions
Dec 2019
It was an excellent experience. we learned about Jews in Poland during WW2, specially in Galicija, by reading the story of Pisek family. A moving story. The museum also celebrates the Jewish culture and it features an interesting photographic exhibition. There’s a coffee shop and a book store.
Written December 31, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Jane2806
Livingston, UK224 contributions
Jul 2022
More an exhibition than a museum in the true sense of the word, as the history was told mostly in photographs rather than artefacts, but moving none the less. Heartbreaking (and sometimes uplifting) to read the stories of individual lives before, during and after the war. Definitely worth visiting
Written July 25, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Siobhan M
10 contributions
Aug 2022
I really enjoyed the exhibitions in this museum. They are mainly photographic and narrative in nature, as opposed to artefacts - but I like this sort of thing. I learned a lot about the Jewish experience in Krakow, especially during the Holocaust. I have given it only four stars (instead of five) because there was one section that was not available in English (the QR code to dowlonad the English captions didn't work), and there was no seating for older people or those with bad backs - like me. But overall, this was a great place to visit if you're interested in modern history.
Written August 7, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

genibre69
London, UK3,245 contributions
Oct 2020 • Solo
I only expected to spend about 20 minutes here but that turned about 1.5 hours. The photo exhibition on Jewish history and monuments in Galicia is excellent and fully translated into English. The captions succinctly describe the haunting photos. The museum is included in the Krakow Card.
Written October 17, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

RachelGottlieb
New York City, NY1 contribution
For many centuries, Krakow and the province of Galicia was the diamond of Jewish scholarship and society in Central Europe. WWII changed all that. The Germans decimated the lives of over 16,000 Jews from the Kazimierz, (Krakow's Jewish quarter), and went on an extermination rampage throughout the province.

This sad history is often why most tourists, like myself, visiting Southern Poland for the first time, traditionally seek out the graveyard of Jewish life at sites like the former camps of Plaszow and Auschwitz.

But I found that one of Krakow's best kept secrets is the Galicia Jewish Museum, located at 18 Dajwor Street in the heart of the Kazimierz. The Museum, housed in a former furniture factory, is the ultimate place to visit if you want to be heartened and enlightened by the restoration of Jewish culture in this lovely city.

While cherishing the memory of the Holocaust, the institution is a vital and important wellspring that joyously celebrates the Jewish history and culture of Galicia.

Its existence is owed to the dedication and vision of one man, British photojournalist, Chris Schwarz, whose mission in creating the Museum was to commemorate Polish Jewry from a completely new perspective. In addition, he hopes the facility will also provide a forum for multi-cultural dialogue and understanding, and for the dissemination of exhibitions and publications to wider audiences around the world.

Recent exhibitions and events have included: an International Day for Darfur; a live performance of an ancient Sanskrit drama, an exhibition of paintings inspired by the Song of Songs and a cooperative photographic exhibition in tribute to the Polish Righteous Among the Nations.

There is also a permanent installation of large format photographs by Chris Schwarz called Traces of Memory, that offer a portrait of Jewish life and culture in Polish Galicia that can still be seen today, interpreting these traces in a manner which is informative, accessible, and thought-provoking.

The Museum’s continuing education program provides lectures and seminars on Jewish history, Holocaust studies, traditional dance forms, and lessons in Yiddish and Hebrew. I was fortunate to attend a evening of Klezmer music there that had the whole place rocking!

The Museum's Media Resource Centre is open to the public and houses a continually growing collection of films on various Jewish and Holocaust related themes, including a permanent collection of USC Shoah Foundation testimonies.

I browsed the book store which is one of the largest in Poland devoted to Jewish material, with an ever-growing number of titles in English, Polish, and German.

I found most of the staff bi-lingual and very ultra-friendly, and there is a very fine coffee shop where visitors can rest their weary feet and enjoy the permanent exhibits.

The Galicia Jewish Museum is open daily from 9.00 AM till 7.00 PM in the summer and from 9.30 AM till 5.30 PM in the winter, and closed only for Yom Kippur. Ticket prices are amazingly low for the value of a visit, costing 7 zlotys for regular admission and 5 zlotys for students.

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Written June 13, 2007
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

GlobeTrotting9204
Santa Rosa, California3 contributions
While visiting the Jewish quarter of Krakow, Poland, we happened upon a fairly new "museum" called the Galicia. Their permanent exhibit called "Traces of Memory" is one of the most potent and memorable presentations I have ever seen. The exhibition is a photographic tribute to Poland's vanished Jewish heritage. The large photos both informed and moved us and brought some closure to our reactions from other Jewish sites we had seen in Poland (like Auschwitz) as well as other Jewish places in Eastern Europe. The photos are the work of 2 photographers who also have added explanations and comments to each photo. The whole exhibit will only take about an hour to go through, but you'll be sorry if you miss seeing this stunning display.
Written December 9, 2005
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

mbsherman
Seattle, WA2 contributions
May 2015 • Couples
The Galicia Jewish Museum features the photo-journalism of Chris Schwarz, a brilliant photographer who chronicled the remnants of the slaughtered Jewish Polish community post-Holocaust. Though the photographs and their accompanying commentary are, in themselves, evocative of great empathy and delineate a history of the Jews in Galicia, an area linking parts of southern Poland and Ukraine, the explication of the exhibit by our guide, Kamila Czerkawska, brought a truly touching and thought-provoking dimension to the photographs.

Ms. Czerkawska is a young non-Jewish woman from a small town whose Jewish population, once 40% of the town's citizenry, was entirely destroyed, leaving only the ruins of the Jewish cemetery. Her grandparents died young and her parents grew up under the Soviet suppression of Jewish history and knew nothing about the pre-war Jewish occupants or their fates. Her curiosity about the remnants of the Jewish cemetery led her to an academic pursuit of Jewish Studies.

The museum exhibit delineates the Galician Jewish history in 5 stages through Chris Schwarz's photographs. One might expect horrific photographs of Nazi brutality or its victims to be featured but what we see is what Mr. Schwarz saw - a synagogue in ruins overgrown with vegetation; Jewish tombstones (matzevot), their inscriptions turned and buried face down, repurposed as paving stones by the war-ravaged Poles whose children are now haunted by the mysterious inexplicable Hebrew squiggles the stones imprint in the earth.

Ms. Czerkawska compellingly told the stories of these photographs, pointing out the irony of the Nazis decorating the Krakow ghetto walls and how the wall-shape resembled an endless line of tombstones. As we stood before a photograph of an empty, flat meadow giving way to untouched forest, Ms. Czerkawska told us we were seeing Belzec - the extermination camp into which the entirety of the 500,000 Galician Jews were herded and murdered - seeing it the way the civilian Poles saw it after the Nazis left, no trace of bodies or of the killing mechanisms used. The Nazis cleared the entirety of the Belzec death camp and left, Ms. Czerkawska explained, not out of fear of reprisal or condemnation, not chased by any Allied forces coming to liberate Jews from Belzec. They cleared and left Belzec a meadow and a forest because they had destroyed every Galician Jew and simply cleaned up and left. In the voice of Ms. Czerkawska, as she told this story, we could hear the heart wrenching horror and the very definition of what Hannah Arendt called "the banality of evil."

Through her commentary on the museum's exhibition, Ms. Czerkawska conveyed the central theme of the museum - that the Holocaust itself does not define the history, social, and cultural contributions of the Galician Jews nor did the Holocaust end these, though it did extinguish the entire Galician Jewish population. There are a couple of ironies that both illuminate that message and cast upon it dark shadows.

First, Chris Schwarz was the son of a Jewish father and a Catholic mother. Religious Jews recognize Jewish lineage only through the mother. And so, this artist/historian who founded the Galicia Jewish Museum; whose eyes and heart recognized and captured so poignantly the place of Galician Jews in the soul of Poland; who died young of prostate cancer, was not allowed to be buried in any of the dozens of Jewish cemeteries he photographed. Had he lived during the Nazi era, he would have been Jewish enough to have been exterminated but not Jewish enough to be ritually interred with his fellow Jews.

Secondly, the restoration of the ruins of the synagogues, cemeteries, and traditional structures that defined Galician Jewish life is, for the most part, not being carried out by the tiny population of surviving Polish Jews. Many of these Jews have despaired of ever being truly recognized as full-fledged Polish citizens and have left Poland. Many, raised during the Soviet era, are only just now beginning to suspect that they might have Jewish roots. In any case, most of the restorations and celebrations of Polish Jewish life are being carried out by young non-Jewish Poles, like Ms. Czerkawska, who see this as a vital part of the totality of Poland's political, scientific, artistic, and cultural heritage. I take heart from the fact that there are people like Chris Schwarz and Kamila Czerkawska who will never forget.
Written May 15, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Clare B
Liverpool, UK542 contributions
Went into the Gallicia museum by chance as we were staying in Kazermeirz and it was around the corner from our hotel on Szeroka Street. It cost 7zlotys or 5 if your a student to get in. The museum was very informative and all the exhibits were in both Polish and English (possibly in another language as well but I can't remember).
We spent a good while in the museum and found the exhibition relating to resistance in Kracow during the nazi occupation very informative. As you go through the museum there are different exhibits and at the back was a special exhibit about a 'Sara' a young jewish woman who kept a diary thruoghout the war.
The museum staff were very helpful and there was a coffee shop and a good book store. I bought a Kracow guide book here as I was unable to purchase one before our trip.
Written September 20, 2007
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

susaninpdx
Portland, OR14 contributions
Dec 2013 • Friends
My two friends and I visited Krakow in December, 2013. We had read about the very large public tours of the Jewish Quarter and WWII ghetto, and decided on a private tour instead. We emailed the Jewish Museum before arriving in Krakow, and they arranged this for us with one of their guides, Gosia. She picked us up at our hotel exactly as arranged, and things proceeded beautifully. The tour was absolutely excellent. We learned a lot, saw a lot, asked a lot of questions, and enjoyed ourselves thoroughly (well, as thoroughly as possible, given the history we were reliving). Well worth the extra money of a private tour, and something we will remember all our lives. Thank you, Gosia!
Written January 5, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Martin22
Oxford40 contributions
The Galicia Jewish Museum is set in a modern building on ul. Dajwor, close to the heart of the old Jewish district. It opens from 9am-7pm in the summer, and 10am-6pm in the winter. It costs 7zl to enter (about £1.50 GBP).

What this museum does so successfully is retain the memory of the thousands who lived and died here during the Nazi holocaust. The collection recounts their stories in vivid and personal detail.

It shows how many tried to resist their fate, and how that resistance came in smaller or greater measures. It also talks of their internal squabbles and conflicts - sometimes we perhaps forget that these were ordinary individuals with human strengths and weaknesses, not just a homogenous unit of suffering.

The museum also tries to show a little of Jewish life after the Holocaust in Poland, and how this has been precarious and sometimes approached with limited sympathy.

It will probably take no more than 2 hours to get round, but this museum leaves a lasting and very personal impression of what happened here during the war years and beyond. There is also a good bookshop and small cafe attached.
Written December 14, 2007
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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Galicia Jewish Museum (Krakow) - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go

Frequently Asked Questions about Galicia Jewish Museum

Galicia Jewish Museum is open:
  • Sun - Sat 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
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Galicia Jewish Museum admission prices can vary. Entrance tickets currently cost $4.94, while a popular guided tour starts around $4.94 per person. See all 19 Galicia Jewish Museum tickets and tours on Tripadvisor

Galicia Jewish Museum can be crowded, so we recommend booking e-tickets ahead of time to secure your spot. If you book with Tripadvisor, you can cancel at least 24 hours before the start date of your tour for a full refund. See all 19 Galicia Jewish Museum tickets and tours on Tripadvisor



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