Emmaus Monastery
Emmaus Monastery
4
Points of Interest & LandmarksReligious Sites
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Monday
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Tuesday
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Friday
11:00 AM - 4:00 PM
About
The Abbey of Emmaus was founded in 1347 by Charles IV., Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia for Benedictine monks who celebrated the liturgy according to Roman rite in ancient Slavic language.
Duration: < 1 hour
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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Nove Mesto (New Town)
Nearly 700 hundred meters long, Wenceslas Square represents the most frequent and buzzing crossroads of the city. The National Museum in the upper part of the square watches over your spending spree in countless shops and retail stores lining the entire square, which ends at Na Příkopě, the most famous shopping street. When tired or broke, you can explore the city's underpasses, which can take you to the Old Town or to the courtyards of art nouveau houses with secret gems of greenery, white benches and rose bushes that provide unexpected peace in the midst of the city. Be sure to pay a visit to the traditional cafés, classic Czech pubs, cinemas and theaters. National Theater near the river has a lot to offer to foreigners. Go to the river bank and enjoy live music and drinks while watching a sunset behind Prague Castle.
How to get there
  • Charles' Square • 4 min walk
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
63 reviews
Excellent
24
Very good
29
Average
7
Poor
3
Terrible
0

Wenovo
Morris County, NJ2,089 contributions
Sep 2014 • Couples
Hard to believe but this monastery was bombed - surely a mistake - by the Americans at the end of the World War II in 1945. A couple years before that the gestapo moved the monks to a concentration camp. The monastery, mostly destroyed except for one wall, was long in disrepair after the war, but eventually restored over the years. It was returned to the monks, when the communist regime fell.
It looks very modern, out off place almost. It is located near the Charles Square.
It will give you a pause, when you realize so much else escaped destruction during the war.
With its interesting centuries old history, this monastery may be off interest to some.
You will most likely not run into too many tourists.
Judging by the very few reviews - it is definitely the lesser known tourist attraction.
Written March 16, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ivan Kinsmam
Kielce, Poland818 contributions
Jun 2016 • Family
The Slovensky Klaster Karla lV was established in the 14th century by Charles IV as a slavonic monastery; he invited slavonic monks from Croatia to inhabit the monastery. Later benedictine monks came from Spain, and there are two 130 year old Spanish olive trees by the entrance.

The monastery is uncommon as it was established in a city, perhaps to administer to the new town being built. It was bombed in 1945 by allied bombers ... the monks had been sent by the Nazis to Dachau in 1942. The communists later took over the monastery and the friar Abbot was imprisoned and died from torture.

This is an extremely holy building with medieval reliefs, a refectory and small intimate chapel. Full of history and well worth a visit if you have the time. 150 kor. for a family ticket and good informative information with it.
Written June 30, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TangCS74
Singapore, Singapore1,349 contributions
Oct 2018 • Solo
Further south of the New Town Hall is the Emmaus Monastery. Took about 10 minutes of leisure walk. Along the way you will pass by other beautiful church such as the Church of St Ignatius and the beautiful but not so clean New Town Hall park which itself was formerly a medieval square.
After entering the main gate of this monastery, you need to turn left and walk another 50m to its ticket office. Ticket payment is by cash only and you will be given a leaflet showing the layout of the monastery and a brief description of the orientation of the murals.
The fresco murals were biblical Christian stories painstakingly incorporated into the inner most walls of the monastery. Most of the murals were damaged or eroded by the passage of times. However one could still see what were still left of these magnificent murals. Each murals were given a description in English as well as Czech. Efforts were made to described how it would look like in its former state.
Within the confine of the halls were the imperial chapel and the monastery. The imperial chapel itself is a work of art with its restored murals. You could exit the hall and there’s a centermost courtyard.
Overall this monastery is less frequented by tourist. It’s quiet and not crowded at all and it’s a fantastic place to spend a morning admiring all these frescos at your own pace.
Written November 12, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jan V
Prague, Czech Republic1,228 contributions
Nov 2016 • Solo
The Monastery is a bit off the main touristic routes, but if you stop by, it is worth the visit. Not that you would go there on purpose. The monastery itself appears as very old and gothic, but the truth is, it has been rebuilt in 19th century to the present state. The frescoes are originally gothic, but that would be it. It is close to the Charles´ Square and the Botanical garden, so then again.. stop by if you pass by...
Written June 6, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Michael-4551
Caloundra, Australia5,458 contributions
Oct 2017 • Friends
Visited on Thursday 12th October. We first saw this building lit up at night with it's unusual spire, so next day we went to have a closer look and found that it was part of Emmaus Monastery. It looks great viewed from across the other side of the river and we also saw it when we did a river cruise on the Vltava River.
Written January 6, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Samantha T
103 contributions
Oct 2017 • Couples
My favourite place in Prague, as it is one place that is not showing off wealth or prestige. Serene, sincere and spiritual. The main church is uplifting, unassuming, so very different to the Baroque excesses elsewhere (I'm not decrying the other churches, I am saying this is a welcome reminder of other styles of worship). But possibly the most outstanding feature is the set of 14th century frescoes, mostly intact despite bomb and water damage. These alone are worth stepping outside the tourist trail. The admission price of 40 crowns is nothing compared to the riches inside. If you only like Baroque art, don't come here, as you will be disappointed.
We were too late in the day to see the gardens which I understand are nice. Do ask the staff to turn on the lights in the cloisters, though, as they are not pro-active in checking the art work is visible! But strangely, seeing the frescos in the gloom was very atmospheric, then in the light gave them a whole new aspect.
Written October 28, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Elena O
Kyiv, Ukraine860 contributions
Sep 2017 • Solo
Emauzy is a monastery complex. Most known of all buildings is Kostel of the Blessed Virgin Mary, St. Jerome and Slavic Saints, which unusual roof in the form of two intersecting peaks is noticeable from many parts of Prague. That roof was built in 1960s during re-construction of ruined during WW2 kostel building. Kostel has remains of old frescos and new paintings in the altar part.
Written September 23, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kathinated
Dunfermline, UK729 contributions
Mar 2017 • Solo
The reconstructed towers of this monastery are one of the most distinctive structures in the city. Accidentally bombed in WWII by the allies who were on their way to Dresden the monastery was not demolished but reconstructed in a very dramatic fashion. While it is very distinctive it is a little way from the centre so is much less visited. Inside is largely plain (due to the deviation) but some significant 13thC murals have survived and been preserved around the cloister and a side chapel. Worth the trip out and you can visit the nearby Vysehrad fortress while you are in the area.
Written March 24, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TheShis
Tel Aviv, Israel39,612 contributions
Sep 2016 • Couples
This beautiful gem of a monastery is seldom visited by tourists.
It features some beautiful architecture and it actually dates back to the 14th century (although it was partially restored after being bombed by the Allies towards the end of WWII).
Written February 17, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Neil K
Liverpool, UK619,734 contributions
Jun 2022 • Friends
Established in 1347 Emmaus Monastery is a beautiful monastery complex that looks amazing and was at one time the only Benedictine monastery in the Bohemian kingdom ,it's a unique looking church ,it's modern church spires are so photogenic ,these beautiful spires are the result of damage from an air raid in 1945 and were added in the 1960's .
I love to view this church from Square Of Emmaus ,wonderful views of Emmaus Monastery and the monastery complex,well worth checking out if you're in the New Town ( Nove Mesto ) .
Written June 3, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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