Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague

Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague

Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague
4.5
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
About
Permanent exhibition Children's Drawings from the Terezin Ghetto Located on the first floor, this exhibition focuses on the fate of Jewish children who were incarcerated in the Terezin ghetto during the Second World War. It is based on the now world famous children's drawings that were made in the ghetto between 1942 and 1944 under the supervision of the artist Friedl Dicker-Brandeis. These emotionally powerful drawings bear testimony to the persecution of Jews during the Nazi occupation of the Bohemian lands in 1939-45. They document the transports to Terezin and daily life in the ghetto, as well as the dreams of returning home and of life in the Jewish homeland of Palestine. The vast majority of the children perished in the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau. The Pinkas Synagogue is part of the Jewish Museum in Prague. The Pinkas Synagogue is the second oldest preserved synagogue in Prague. Bbuilt in the late Gothic style in 1535, it was founded by Aaron Meshulam Horowitz, a prominent member of the Prague Jewish Community, and probably named after his grandson, Rabbi Pinkas Horowitz. It was originally a place of prayer for the Horowitz family and was located near a ritual bath (mikveh). It was restored to its original form in 1950-54. Memorial to the Bohemian and Moravian Victims of the Shoah In 1955-60 the Pinkas Synagogue was turned into a memorial to the nearly 80,000 Jewish victims of the Shoah from Bohemia and Moravia. One of the earliest memorials of its kind in Europe, it is the work of two painters, Václav Boštík and Jiří John. After the Soviet invasion of 1968, the memorial was closed to the public for more than 20 years. It was fully reconstructed and reopened to the public in 1995 after the fall of the Communist regime.
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Plan your visit
The area
Address
Neighborhood: Josefov
Josefov houses Prague’s Jewish community. This small neighborhood centered around Široká street is completely surrounded by Staré Město (Old Town). As the former Jewish Ghetto, today all that remains are a few synagogues and the oldest surviving Jewish cemetery in Europe. The narrow streets were once small enough that a person could touch the houses on both sides. You can still feel the dignity and history this neighborhood carries in its legacy as Franz Kafka’s birthplace. Nearby streets are full of kosher restaurants, museums and antique bookstores.
How to get there
  • Old Town • 3 min walk
  • Lesser • 7 min walk
Reach out directly
See what travelers are saying
  • Brun066
    Florence, Italy13,110 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The second oldest synagogue in Prague, among those still functioning today.
    This synagogue, which dates back to 1535, is the second oldest among those still functioning in Prague (the first, which is also the first in Europe, the Old-New Synagogue, dates back to 1270). The era of construction is clearly evident from its architecture. This is especially true for the interior, with the red brick ribs standing out on the remaining part of the vault, in white plaster, and singularly reminiscent of Gothic churches (in Czechia Gothic persisted until the 16th century). Other details, however, such as the portal, are frankly Renaissance. Instead, the "bimah", that is, the raised platform used for Torah reading during services, adorned with an iron grill, is in Baroque style. In fact, it was rebuilt in the second half of the 18th century, after the damage caused by one of the floods caused by the Vltava, which are not uncommon (the last one has been in 2002) because the floor of the synagogue is sunken compared to that of the surrounding neighborhood. The feature for which the synagogue is most famous is the memory it bears of the Bohemian and Moravian Jews killed in the Nazi extermination camps between 1941 and 1945. They, counted at 77,297, have their names and surnames, the date of birth and the date of death, engraved on the walls of the synagogue: laconic and terrible testimony from the local page of a European tragedy.
    Thank you for your review and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.
    Written November 27, 2023
    This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
    Visited October 2023
    Traveled with friends
    Written November 22, 2023
  • veronica l
    Northumberland, United Kingdom95 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    A very moving experience
    The synagogue is almost empty. The walls however are covered, floor to ceiling, with over 77,000 names of jews who were transported from the local ares to various camps, the names of which are also displayed on the main wall. After each name is a date of birth - many have the same dates of death. Upstairs is an exhibition of childrens drawings. Whilst in Terezin camp the young children took drawing classes and drew what they saw every day. When it was decided to clear the camp some drawings were hidden and survived. The artists are named and dates of birth given - again their death dates are recorded too.
    Visited December 2023
    Traveled solo
    Written December 20, 2023
  • BlueyBear
    Doncaster, United Kingdom46 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Very moving
    We bought our ticket from the information centre who gave us a map of the sites. This map is wrong! Use the small map on the ticket. There was a security alert when we arrived at the synagogue so we had to call back later. Once inside it was incredible to see the walls covered in names and dates. The childrens' drawings were very moving. Exit seemed to only be via the cemetery.
    Visited April 2024
    Traveled as a couple
    Written April 27, 2024
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles1,031 reviews
Excellent
607
Very good
288
Average
92
Poor
23
Terrible
21

veronica l
Northumberland, UK95 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2023 • Solo
The synagogue is almost empty. The walls however are covered, floor to ceiling, with over 77,000 names of jews who were transported from the local ares to various camps, the names of which are also displayed on the main wall. After each name is a date of birth - many have the same dates of death.
Upstairs is an exhibition of childrens drawings. Whilst in Terezin camp the young children took drawing classes and drew what they saw every day. When it was decided to clear the camp some drawings were hidden and survived. The artists are named and dates of birth given - again their death dates are recorded too.
Written December 20, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brun066
Florence, Italy13,110 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Friends
This synagogue, which dates back to 1535, is the second oldest among those still functioning in Prague (the first, which is also the first in Europe, the Old-New Synagogue, dates back to 1270).
The era of construction is clearly evident from its architecture. This is especially true for the interior, with the red brick ribs standing out on the remaining part of the vault, in white plaster, and singularly reminiscent of Gothic churches (in Czechia Gothic persisted until the 16th century). Other details, however, such as the portal, are frankly Renaissance.
Instead, the "bimah", that is, the raised platform used for Torah reading during services, adorned with an iron grill, is in Baroque style. In fact, it was rebuilt in the second half of the 18th century, after the damage caused by one of the floods caused by the Vltava, which are not uncommon (the last one has been in 2002) because the floor of the synagogue is sunken compared to that of the surrounding neighborhood.
The feature for which the synagogue is most famous is the memory it bears of the Bohemian and Moravian Jews killed in the Nazi extermination camps between 1941 and 1945. They, counted at 77,297, have their names and surnames, the date of birth and the date of death, engraved on the walls of the synagogue: laconic and terrible testimony from the local page of a European tragedy.
Written November 22, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.
Written November 28, 2023
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

TravelerTrecker
Houston833 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022
Very interesting! Very different from the others that are part of the Jewish museum. It is dedicated to the Holocaust. It is a memorial to all Jews who were deported to Terezin and other concentration camps. The walls describe the names of the victims and they are grouped as families. The names are mentioned by a recording as well. It has a moving exhibit of drawings made by children in Terezin. It also has a very interesting outdoors exhibit.

I did not see tour groups which is good as the place is not large. The visit was actually relaxed. The audio guide was very useful!
Written February 18, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.
Written February 20, 2023
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

David D
1,212 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2021
The Pinkas Synagogue stands at the entrance to the Old Jewish Cemetery, but is worth seeing in its own right. It dates from the 1500s, but now is mostly dedicated to being a memorial of the Shoah. 78,000 names of those who died from the Czech lands are written on the walls and the sheer scale of the horror is hard to grasp. The names were written in the 1960’s and have been re-inscribed twice since that time due to water damage. Lest we forget.

Upstairs in the synagogue are drawings that were made by children in one of the concentration camps, which are a sad reminder of those who never reached adulthood. The Pinkas Synagogue is a sobering place.
Written August 19, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.
Written August 26, 2021
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

h_schamhardt
The Netherlands211 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019 • Family
Smallish synagogue with on every wall, the names of about 80000 Jews who died during World War Two at the hand of the nazis. Weirdly light and haunting at the same time.
Upstairs exhibition of drawings made by children in Terezin camp, offers a terrible insight in what they had to go through, whilst some people were trying to create some semblance of normalcy...
Written December 31, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.
Written March 6, 2020
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

BlueyBear
Doncaster, UK46 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2024 • Couples
We bought our ticket from the information centre who gave us a map of the sites. This map is wrong! Use the small map on the ticket.
There was a security alert when we arrived at the synagogue so we had to call back later.
Once inside it was incredible to see the walls covered in names and dates. The childrens' drawings were very moving.
Exit seemed to only be via the cemetery.
Written April 27, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

NCtravelz
Raleigh, NC1,661 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2022 • Family
An excellent museum in a beautiful synagogue. There was a line to get tickets but someone stopped us and directed us to the IRC around the corner which had no line. We bought a multi-site ticket plus audio tour. The audio tour was well worth it. The Holocaust memorial and the children's drawings from the concentration camp are very impactful.
Written December 4, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.
Written December 14, 2022
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Ana V
Eugene, OR654 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2022
This is Prague's second oldest house of worship dating from the 1500s. Following WWII the names of 77,297 Czech Jews who perished in the Nazi concentration camps were placed on the walls. There is a beautiful wrought iron bema in the middle. Buy your combined ticket for all synagogues.
Written July 15, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.
Written July 25, 2022
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Darcy M
San Francisco, CA4 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Couples
I wish we had done our homework before visiting. This is an important site to visit, with incredible history. National Geographic says it’s one of 10 most important cemeteries to visit in the world. However, explanations and signage in the synagogue is very poor, and the self-guided audio tour available onsite was TERRIBLE.
Written October 23, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review. Audioguide JMP does not operate, any complaint should be addressed to: info@audioguide.cz. The reactions of the majority of visitors, however, clearly indicates satisfaction with the service.
Written November 9, 2023
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Wenovo
Morris County, NJ2,033 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2017 • Couples
As you walk you see the rows of names, painstakingly hand painted on the walls.
Row after row in a small print so they can fit them all. Floor to ceiling. 80,000 names = 80,000 people. All victims of the Holocaust, from just one small nation -Czechoslovakia....

Last year in the summer the Synagogue was much more crowded and we left after spending very little time.

This time, a year later in September, there were only few people inside. We were able to have a lengthy conversation filled with facts and interesting details with one of the employees in attendance. Almost like a guided tour.
She was a tall white-haired lady, she said she was eighty years old. I can only assume that she had a great personal attachment to the Jewish history and this place.
She pointed out to us the names of Madeleine Albright grandparents that perished in the Holocaust.

All the people with the same last name have only their first names listed with dates of birth and death. All the names of the victims are being recited in a monotone voice without stopping in the background. It just goes on and on. Haunting!

One floor up is a heartbreaking display of art works created by the children inTerezin. There are names and photographs above their sketches .
Those that did not make it and the very few that did.
Heartbreaking !
Written October 21, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review and we´ll be pleased to see you again in the museum.
Written December 7, 2017
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

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Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague

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