Arch of Victory

Arch of Victory, Ballarat: Address, Arch of Victory Reviews: 4.5/5

Arch of Victory
4.5
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4.5
165 reviews
Excellent
112
Very good
47
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Jeffry b
Essendon, Australia10,975 contributions
The Arch of Victory commemorates all those men and women from the Ballarat area who volunteered to serve their country in World War One. Its construction was funded entirely from voluntary donations from local people. It forms the entrance to the Avenue of Honour, which is the longest such memorial avenue to be found anywhere in the world. Edward, the Prince of Wales, declared the Arch open on 2 June 1920, making the Arch over 100 years old, It's one of Ballarat's most popular visitor destinations.
Written May 13, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Jeffry b
Essendon, Australia10,975 contributions
The Arch of Honour was opened by the Prince of Wales in 1920. The Arch is 17 metres (55 feet) tall. It is the highlight of the Avenue of Honour, 4 km (2 1/2 miles) west of the city centre. It is a handsome structure, constructed of cement and brick, The Arch is at the corner of Sturt St and Learmonth St. The Arch commemorates those men and women from Ballarat and districts who served in armed conflicts,
Written December 21, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Jeffry b
Essendon, Australia10,975 contributions
The Arch of Victory caught me by surprise. It is a substantial structure, intended to commemorate the sacrifices of the people of Ballarat and districts in World War I. The Arch of Victory is the beginning of the Avenue of Honor, which consists of 3,771 trees, one for each local person who volunteered to serve in WWI. Not only was this the first such Avenue in Victoria, it is also the longest, stretching for 22 km (14 miles). The trees are elms and mountain ashes. The are other Avenues of Honor in Victoria, but this one remains among the most impressive
Written March 15, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

1TraveltheWorld
Alice Springs, Australia12,158 contributions
Couples
The Victory Arch at the entrance to the Avenue of Honour is located on the West side of Ballarat.
If you would like to see this properly, you had better park the car on the side street as the traffic here is non stop, especially near the roundabout at the start. Many of the trees that continue down the avenue have plaque's commemorating fallen soldiers with their names.
Written February 17, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

MobileResident
Mobile,AL990 contributions
Solo
This restored monument is definitely worth visiting if one is in Ballarat.
The 14 mile long Avenue of Honor that originally had 3,900 trees with associated plaques is most impressive.
I thought that the recently added Garden of the Grieving Mother which is adjacent to the Arch of Victory is fitting and particularly well done.
Written December 23, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

yummy472
Ballarat, Australia210 contributions
The Avenue of Honour at Ballarat is the longest Avenue of Honour in Australia (Approximately 22 kilometres).
There were around 1,000 trees planted and I was thrilled to find family ones. It took a long while but it was worth it. It is a simple stretch of road but the feel is overwhelming as you think of what those men and women and their families endured for us. I truely respect and value them all. I am so proud the city of Ballarat has honoured those who gave up so much without asking for anything in return.
It is one of the earliest known memorial avenues to have been planted in Victoria and that in itself shows how wonderful this regional town is and what they represent. I strongly suggest this as a top tourist destination.
The avenue is a delightful commemoration of service personnel no matter what rank or position you held. It is this that I highly regard as an amazing community and my first historical contact showing a respect of equality no matter where you have come from life.
Originally 23 different species of trees were planted in the Avenue but to date I am unsure. It is wonderful how the trees line both sides of the road.
Ballarat is a historical town with so much to discover.
Not to far from here you can visit the wonderful Lake Wendouree (a man made lake of brilliance),the Australian Ex-Prisoners of War Memorial, stroll through the Botanical Gardens, see the Prime minister's head (statues!), stroll to the 1956 Olympic rings precedent, Victoria park and so much more.

Parking is available along Wendouree Parade if you want to visit the Lake and there is parking around the avenue depending what part you stop at. To be honest there is ample parking available. There are buses near Wendouree Parade near the North Gardens.

There are toilets located at either end of the Botanical Gardens and Pipers the Parade restaurant, in Victoria Park, the Bridge Mall and in other shopping centers. Most have disabled toilets and are clearly marked. Ballarat also has lots of parking including many disabled ones.
Written March 20, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Rusty3350
Hamilton, Australia238 contributions
Couples
The Imposing Arch is the start of the longest Avenue of Honour in the world, and as you drive towards Burrumbeet, you can only be moved by the sheer number of magnificent trees, each with its own brass plaque dedicated to a soldier. Our visit, not long after Anzac Day, and each Plaque had a Red Poppy attached. A most appropriate gesture, being the Centenary of Galipoli.
Written May 19, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

fional943
Ballarat, Australia2,115 contributions
Solo
This is a quick stop for anyone from out of town.
Head west along Sturt Street, past Victoria Park and Ballarat High.

Located on the old Western Highway a bit beyond the town centre of Ballarat the Arch of Victory, was funded by the citizens of Ballarat at the end of World War 1. It marks the beginning of the Avenue of Honour, fourteen miles of trees commemorating some 3,700 local and often young men who died during their overseas service during World War 1.

The Arch of Victory was funded exclusively by donations from local citizens as a local landmark to honour Ballarat's contribution to this sad and unfortunate conflict, that robbed the young nation of so many lives.

A large photo of the Arch of Victory, also covered a wall at the old Returned Serviceman's Club.

ANZAC Day services are not held at the Arch of Victory, but at the Ballarat Semitaph in the hospital zone of Sturt Street.

I would suggest veterans and others interested in Ballarat's military history visit the Arch of Victory, Avenue of Honour, the nearby Prisoner of War Memorial in the Lake Wendouree Gradens precinct, have a look at the canons from the Crimean war, outside Pipers opposite the Botanical Gardens and visit the RSL's Collection in Dawson Street as well as more World War 1 & 2 memorabilia at the George Hotel in Lydiard St.

Finally, a visit to the Old Ballarat Cemetery as well as Eureka stockade is worth it, in relation to Ballarat being one of the few places in Australia, where an armed conflict has taken place, excluding the unofficial war that raged upon Australia's indigenous people at the time of colonisation as the British occupied the land!
Written December 7, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Willison
Australia36 contributions
Friends
The trees in the Arch of Victory were planted by the staff of Lucas Factory after WW1. Originally the road was between the rows of trees on either side Over the years the road has become too narrow for the traffic so the area has had another road beside the original to make a divided highway. Each Tree has a plaque with the name of the Service Man from Ballarat who served for their country, Australia. I find it very touching that they are remembered in this way and with the trees "They shall not grow old" as the trees grows on still in memory of them.
Written June 20, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Kerry H
Largs, Australia37 contributions
I have no idea this monument existed until researching for our Victorian holiday. It is beautiful and I am surprised it isn't promoted more. It reminds me of the Champs-Eylsees. Well worth visiting if you are in the region.
Written May 4, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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