Natural Hot Springs
Natural Hot Springs
4
What people are saying
Takaharu Oda
By Takaharu Oda
Super cheap and easy to enjoy
5.0 of 5 bubblesDec 2019
This trip may not be for people with no brave heart and those with small children. But if you (and your partner) are brave enough, then a trip to Korbous and Ain Atrous (59℃ hot spring or foot spa on stones) would be jolly good. I’ll share my day trip from Tunis in the following. The most important is to take Louage (minibus) twice. I took the first one from the louage station just south to Gare de Tunis, the destination of which is ‘Soliman’. And from Soliman I took the second one to Korbous. In total I paid less than 5 dinars for the one way louages. On the second louage, don’t forget that the FREE natural hot spa ‘Ain Atrous’ is just before Korbous, so I got off the louage at the spot. After enjoying a foot spa there and eating some tasty fish and chips despite the photo, I walked along the beach to Korbous (nobody was swimming in the water for it was in December). It was a walking distance in between, approx. 15 minutes. Arriving at Korbous, I felt a bit empty around the town, but I completed my mission: thalassothérapie. This was astonishingly cheap and indeed ‘thalasso’ (hot seawater, marine mud, algae, and something soothing the skin). I know nothing about the European style across the Mediterranean Sea, but the thalasso quality was lovely for me. Don’t forget your second underpants (or swimming suits) and towel, if you likewise want to enjoy. Finally, while you may wait for a while, I soon caught a louage to Soliman and the fare was the same as before. All in all, one can much enjoy a hidden treasure of Tunisia’s neglected tourism. This resort town should revive much more!

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eddiebrylcreem
Aylesbury, UK69 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2011 • Couples
Lats November we left the crowded streets of Hammamet, some 40 miles from Tunis, and drove to Korbous, a tiny town on the Cap Bon peninsula.

Strictly speaking we didn’t actually reach Korbous itself; for its main attraction - the Ain Atrous (or Goat Spring) - is to be found a mile or so away. In high season the place can get pretty crowded, with people coming from miles around, even from the capital, to take advantage of the hot sulphurous water gushing out of the rocks. But when we arrived, on this particular winter day, there were maybe half a dozen local men, all elderly, sitting around the pools just above where the water enters the sea.

I had the impression they met up there most days, quite pleased to have the place more or less to themselves. But they showed no signs of displeasure at the sight of Jane and me coming to share their space at the stone pools through which the water is guided towards the sea. All the men were barefoot, though none had their feet actually dangling in the water since, at 60 degrees centigrade, you would have lost most of your surface skin within seconds.

A tiny, bearded smiling man, the genius loci, brandishing a short broom appropriate to his size, came over with the cut off bottom half of a large plastic mineral water bottle and, with a deft flick of the wrist, filled it up, laid it beside me and stood back to watch.

The nearest of the elderly men demonstrated the ritual to me, indicating that I should imitate him. Like him I was wearing a simple cotton robe, his a local djebba, mine a kaftan from Turkey, so it was easy to roll up my sleeves and bare my knees. My neighbour took his half bottle, shook some hot water into the palm of his other hand and massaged it into the opposite elbow, nodding approval as he saw me do the same. He then worked on the other elbow, both hands, and down to the knees, feet and toes. Finally it was time for the face, with mouth, ears and nostrils being rinsed out. He then removed his skull cap and splashed water over his head and what remained of his hair. Oddly, it is only now, writing about it, that I realise that he was carrying out a version of the wudhu, the ritual washing which every Muslim is duty-bound to do before any act of prayer, combining this with particular care being paid to the various joints susceptible to arthritis in people of our age.

Shortly afterwards the group of men went off, and we decided it was time to see what it was like in the sea itself. Two men, brothers by the look of them, both in their 30s, were at the bottom of the steps, about to let themselves down in the water. When they saw us carefully making our way down the rather uneven steps they stayed near the edge, pointing out how slippery the rocks were, and helped us in, showing us the best places to stand, where the almost boiling water was tempered by the incoming December waves. They themselves stood ensconced in a little hollow, a metre from where the water landed and, in unison, washed their hair, using little sachets of shampoo thrown down to them from above by a friend.

We stayed there I’m not sure how long, swaying gently as the larger waves hit us, smiling beatifically as the water warmed us to our bones and the sulphur-laden air penetrated deep into our lungs. By the time we were ready to get out we had been joined by a further three or four men, one in a wet-suit proudly displaying the huge octopus he had caught with his harpoon. One of the others handed me out first, adding - in French - that I should help ‘the gazelle’ myself.

The little man had been looking after our things and, once dry and clothed again, I gave him a well deserved couple of dinars before we walked a few more steps up towards the little restaurant overlooking the sea, where the sign showed that fresh fish was available for lunch. Some grilled octopus perhaps?
Written March 13, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Marcio A
Lisbon, Portugal68 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2012 • Friends
Wheter you´ll like it or not, really depends on how adventurous you are. Korbous is beautiful, but it´s a simple place, with not much of an infrastructure. If you expect a beautiful spa, with fountains, pools, etc you´ll be disappointed. On the other hand, if you like to explore, and to know places ´out of the ordinary´, you´ll probably love it. The main spring just gushes from the mountain into the sea. Dependind on the season (especially in Summer), it will be overcrowded - mostly families from the northern (poorer) neighborhoods of Tunis. They may seem a little noisy, but hey, it´s nice to know local people. Tunisians are friendly and they will be curious about you, and will try to make friends. Some seashell sellers will try to push you into buying something by firstly saying it´s a gift, just say ´non, merci´.

Getting to Korbous is not very easy. In any case, you´ll need a car. Plan a day trip and get a good map. I think it´s easier to get there by Grombalia, even if you´re in Tunis. Follow the signs towards El Houaria. In case of doubt, stop and ask for directions (there are many small roads in this region). As you approach Korbous, the landscape if really beautiful, with mountains and cliffs. I did remind me of some places in South Italy, with the difference that there are no houses, hotels and restaurants around. You can visit the hot springs, spend some time and have lunch in Korbous. The village itself is some 2-3 km after the springs and looks a little ´abandoned´. But it´s a nice small village. If you keep driving through it, you´ll get to a restaurant overlooking the sea. This place is great. Good food, unexpensive and with an amazing view (on a clear day). All in all, it´s worth the trip. You´ll see a different side of Tunisia. A popular one, completely different from the touristic Hammamet or Soussa. As I said, it will really depend on wheter you came to Tunisia in order to stay in a nice hotel or if you´d like to know a little about the countryside and the way locals enjoy their free time.
Written May 19, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Takaharu Oda
Dublin, Ireland10 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019 • Solo
This trip may not be for people with no brave heart and those with small children. But if you (and your partner) are brave enough, then a trip to Korbous and Ain Atrous (59℃ hot spring or foot spa on stones) would be jolly good. I’ll share my day trip from Tunis in the following. The most important is to take Louage (minibus) twice. I took the first one from the louage station just south to Gare de Tunis, the destination of which is ‘Soliman’. And from Soliman I took the second one to Korbous. In total I paid less than 5 dinars for the one way louages. On the second louage, don’t forget that the FREE natural hot spa ‘Ain Atrous’ is just before Korbous, so I got off the louage at the spot. After enjoying a foot spa there and eating some tasty fish and chips despite the photo, I walked along the beach to Korbous (nobody was swimming in the water for it was in December). It was a walking distance in between, approx. 15 minutes. Arriving at Korbous, I felt a bit empty around the town, but I completed my mission: thalassothérapie. This was astonishingly cheap and indeed ‘thalasso’ (hot seawater, marine mud, algae, and something soothing the skin). I know nothing about the European style across the Mediterranean Sea, but the thalasso quality was lovely for me. Don’t forget your second underpants (or swimming suits) and towel, if you likewise want to enjoy. Finally, while you may wait for a while, I soon caught a louage to Soliman and the fare was the same as before. All in all, one can much enjoy a hidden treasure of Tunisia’s neglected tourism. This resort town should revive much more!
Written December 25, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Johanne C
158 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2016 • Friends
I visited in March/April and the sea water was super cold and very wavy. TO get to the hot springs was very dangerous and to stay in it even more as my head was hitting the rocks. Yes it was my own fault by going in in the first place, but I was not about to miss on this experience :) There is no surveillance or lifeguard of any sort. The hot springs that are not in the sea were extremely hot, too hot to put any part of your body in it. But it was nice resting my feet on the hot rocks above the water. Beautiful surrounding scenery. Did not make into town. Do not go eat at the outside restaurant on the premises - very very bad food. Did not try the indoor one, can't possibly be as bad ... All in all enjoyable with caution
Written January 4, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

tsharkas
Ben Arous, Tunisia41 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2015 • Friends
This is a great place for those who love nature, a place between the awesome green mountain and amazing sea beach, the hot water comes from the heart of the mountain and fall into the cold sea water, it is amazing and healthy
Written January 2, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alex L
London, UK284 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2014 • Couples
We rented a car to drive around the Cap Bon area and it was quite a trek to get to Korbous - it wasn't quite obvious where it was when we finally got there. There is a big carpark by the sea and the hot springs emerge by the beach. The locals swim where the hot spring waters meet the cool sea water and even though we were there on a weekday, the place was packed! The locals were extremely friendly and helpful - but I declined to swim for one reason: I took a look at the locals there and you had older ladies swimming fully clothed (and veiled) in the sea and I decided that my swimming trunks were decidedly inappropriate for this culture. They were fine in my 5 star hotel in Hammamet away from the locals but I thought, ooops, I should have brought something a lot more modest, that came down to my knees if I wanted to swim in the sea with the locals here. Don't get me wrong - my swimming trunks are perfectly decent, even conservative by European standards but I just didn't want any uninvited attention from the locals and I didn't want to risk offending anyone. So if you are going to go there, remember - this is a very conservative Muslim country and your choice of swimming attire must be extremely modest if you want to swim with the locals.

There is a man in the carpark 'charging' you to park there if you wanted to stay there and swim - but because all we did was to walk around and take a few photos, he didn't charge me anything.
Written September 16, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David A
8 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2017
There's a public access location where the piping hot water is channeled into a first small pool and then to a second. The latter has large rocks where one can rest ones feet - but even the rocks are very not. I couldn't actually immerse my feet, but instead scooped water over them with my hands. It still felt great on that sunny but cool day. From the second pool the water exits to run off into the sea, where people where in swim wear enjoying the joining of the waters. I wish I'd taken along my trunks.

A short walk up the road is the actual town. It's tiny. There are a few restaurants, a semi-upscale spa treatment facility, and an old-fashioned hammam. I thought it would be a nice place for a three-day visit, having some spa time and getting to know the locals. But a bit of a morning, sadly, had to suffice.
Written March 15, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

midou j
Ramsgate, UK4 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
It's a very small village with few restaurants and bars (in village) ...

We basically went on a day trip, we stopped to enjoy the hot water and the great view , we ate something pretty nice (banbaloni) which is the Italian pastry mixed with sugar.

Than a bit far is the town. Had few beers and a nice meal in one of the restaurants,

It was an amazing day, the view when coming down the road to korbous looked like st.troupez's hill...
Written February 13, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

L_saida2013
Bern, Switzerland27 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2013 • Friends
If you happen to be in the Cap Bon region (Bay of Tunis), don't miss this place. Korbous was once a village well known and visited for it's hot springs with several spas and health resorts. Now these days have long passed - but I still like this idyllic spot. And there are still spas and hotels there. I usually go there for a half day trip, just to enjoy the landscape and the view.
From (e.g.) Soliman take a shared taxi and let the driver bring you to Ain Latrous, the first one of several hot springs. There you can sit and hold your naked feet over(!) the almost boiling hot water, smelling of sulfur, buy some souvenirs and walk along the seaside to Korbous (30-40 minutes).
There I strongly recommend the café overlooking the Bay of Tunis, which is open during tourist season, spring and summer. Very nice at sundown! But make sure you have a solution to get back (phone number of taxidriver)..
Written October 4, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alix
31 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2023 • Couples
The general landscape is nice, however the crowd is quite rowdy and rough around this area. We did not feel welcome here and some locals verbally abused us during our 5 minute walk through the area. We decided to leave immediately as we felt extremely unsafe (which we haven‘t yet in tunisia). There are some camps set up and overall it seems like this is a place for people to cross into Italy illegally. A lot of trash and can definitely be skipped on your trip.
Written June 6, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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