Tykocin Synagogue
Tykocin Synagogue
4.5

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles146 reviews
Excellent
99
Very good
34
Average
9
Poor
2
Terrible
2

Dominik Kiezik
Warsaw, Poland5,320 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2023 • Friends
Quite Interesting Synagogue. I know that during holidays and dates that are important for Jews, many of them come to this town to celebrate their celebrations. There were few tourists when I was there. It can be seen that the building may at least partly date back to its construction around the 17th century, perhaps earlier.
Written May 7, 2023
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Marek P
Gdansk, Poland1,916 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2020
Despite the name Grand, the synagogue does not seem huge when viewed from the outside. Once inside, you wonder why such a large space inside. The synagogue from the 17th century was destroyed during World War II. Nowadays it is superbly restored and it is worth visiting.
Written November 23, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Lech S
Katowice, Poland56 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2013 • Solo
"The Great Synagogue" is the second biggest synagogue in Poland (after Krakow), established in 1642. One of the oldest in Poland. The main attraction of Tykocin, alongside the castle.
Inside we can see the bimah, located in the centre, the old torahs and other Judaic items, walls with painting of Hebrew inscriptions of prayers. In the building there is also a archaeological exhibition about Tykocin (included in the price of tickets) which used to be a Polish royal town.
There is also the Talmudic House (the small Synagogue/Bet Midrash - study and prayer hall) which is aside the Great Synagogue and the admission is included in the tickets for the previous one. It houses a permanent exhibition about Zygmunt Gloger and martyrdom of Tykocin’s inhabitants during WWII, small old pharmacy and temporary artistic exhibition. In the building there is also a restaurant “Tejsza” serving Jewish cuisine.
The admission fee has risen recently to 10 PLN for adults and 5 PLN discount (students, retired, teachers). Closed on Mondays.
Written October 4, 2013
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Marcin 🇵🇱🇬🇧🇸🇪🇷🇺
Warsaw, Poland34 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Friends
Time well spent. Definitely recommend. Very interesting story to listen with the audio giide. After listening to the story we went to the House of Prayer, just next to the synagogue. Interesting to see how local Jews lived. Also, please look at the cobble stone streets, muddy driveways... it all gives a bit of tbe authentic pact character.
Written July 29, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

smintario
Dortmund, Germany41 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2016 • Couples
We visited the Synagoge in Tykocin together with the museum. It was quite impressive, to see such an old building in a very good shape. Together with entry fee, you got an audio guide (in english or polish) which told you about the history of the building and the jewish community in Tykocin. In fact, it was one of the biggest communities in Poland. The tellings then stopped, not mentioning what happened to all of the Jews during second world war. There was a progrom in 1941, killing all the Jews (still almost 1400) around.

Nowadays, there is no remembrance of this. If you walk through the town, you have no monument remembering, in the Synagoge as well we had to ask about this fact. Then we got a little piece of paper, where you could just read what is also on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tykocin_pogrom

It seems, nobody wants to deal with this part of history, especially not the locals. Now there are no Jews in Tykocin anymore. Very sad.
Written July 20, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David R
Baltimore, MD41 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Family
My wife and I were in Warsaw and I had read about the restoration of this old synagogue. Not one of the largest in pre-war Poland, but of historical significance. Typical of the free-standing sunken fortrass synagogues of its era. We got a guide in Warsaw to take us. After WW2 synagogue fell into disrepair, and has recently bee3n resored to "like-new" condition. While we were there several Jewish groups came through, one from North Ameraica, one from South America. Tycochin pre-WW2 was 50% Jewish, 50% Catholic. The synagogue was at one end of the town, the church on the other, with the town marketplace in between. We got a thorough tour of the town and the local guides at the synagogue were helpful (being Jewish, we know what we were looking at and reading on the inscriptions). Guides facilitated our photography. Agree that what happened to the community was glossed over. Our Warsaw guide took us to the spot in the forest a few miles outside of town where the Nazi's murdered the community over a two day period. There are memorials there marking the mass graves. On our way we briefly stopped at the Jewish cemetery. Basically, the Nazi's tried to erase hundreds of years of Jewish history in this place. They wiped out the people, sadly. The synagogue and vestiges of the cemetery remain as testiment. If you are interested in Jewish history, and Jewish civilization / culture, worth a visit.
Written July 8, 2019
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Followeveryrainbow
Ra'anana, Israel410 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2016 • Solo
The 400-year-old synagogue in the small town of Tykocin is one of the few Jewish houses of prayer that has managed to stay standing in Poland, despite the depredations of time, pogroms, Nazis, and post-war Communists. Partially restored in the 1970s and turned into a museum, it is a beautiful small early baroque building with high arches, tall columns and traditional verses and images on the walls. It is a sad jolt to learn that during WWII, the town's entire Jewish population, about 8,000 people, was herded into the town's market place, then marched out into the nearby forest and shot en masse into large pits they had been made to dig themselves expressly for that purpose. The empty synagogue, today being respectfully looked after by non-Jewish caretakers -- the day we were there workmen on scaffolding were tending to the wall of the Torah ark -- is a silent, moving testament to that horrific end to hundreds of years of Jewish life in this little town.
Written January 14, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

2912OK
Berlin, Germany14 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2016 • Business
Very friendly personal giving explanation and a very well done audioguide. A must to do for people with interest in Jewish history.
Written September 24, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BrightMidnightTravel
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania17 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2014 • Friends
The synagogue itself is certainly an interesting leftover relic that remained. There is a fee to enter but on Saturday's the two museums in town are free to enter. The ladies were very friendly and they had little hand knit egg warmers for sale that were very cute!
Written May 10, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Elkabelka
Boulder, CO567 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Couples
This town has had brutal history which had 2000 of its Jewish inhabitants annihilated by the Nazis. Considering that only 2000 live there now, the sense of loss is immense. The Baroque Tykocin Synagogue was built in 1642 and is considered one of the best preserved in Poland from that era.
Written July 15, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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