Lepakshi Bull
Lepakshi Bull
4.5
Historic SitesPoints of Interest & LandmarksReligious SitesMonuments & Statues
About
Duration: < 1 hour
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Tours & experiences
Explore different ways to experience this place.
The area
Address
Reach out directly
Best nearby
We rank these restaurants and attractions by balancing reviews from our members with how close they are to this location.
Attractions
2 within 6 miles

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles446 reviews
Excellent
201
Very good
212
Average
30
Poor
2
Terrible
1

latheshrao
Bengaluru, India580 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2021 • Solo
Visited Lepakshi Bull Statue enroute to Kurnool from Bangalore…..supposedly it’s the place where Jatayu fell after being attacked by Ravana as per Hindu mythology. There’s a statue of Jatayu/ bird on top of a hilltop; it’s relatively new …A bull statue is there …..which is of some significance, being older…not worth the effort for a detour
Written September 24, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

aski_online
Bangalore District, India240 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2023 • Family
At 2-3 hours drive from Bangalore, the place is quite easy to reach via own vehicle. You have 3 locations to visit here, more or nearby.
1. The working Veerbhadra temple with the compound holding the bit older Nagalingam in this compound now. The old unfinished Siva/Parvathy marriage hall also is inside the compound. Car parking available which is basically on the back side of the temple. Rest rooms were under construction as of Jan 2023. Lot of shops available on the main entrance side . We can reach near as well by car, but is bit congested.
2. The Nandi statue, which is the largest monolithic Nandi in a different compound nearby (though in the very olden days should have been per of the Nagalingam present in the current Veeerabhadra temple compound . This one is under ASI and well maintained with no entrance fee. (Toilet facilities etc. available here)
3. The Jatayu park, a simple simple rock structure with a Jatayu statue on the top. One need to climb the iron steps to get to the top, may not be suitable for elders.

All places can be covered in couple of hours time leisurely. Did not find any decent hotels for breakfast/lunch. Choose winter season and early morning hours for pleasant trip.
Written January 9, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

tushar_pai
Milton Keynes, UK2,935 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2022 • Couples
Second largest monolithic statue in India after Shravanbelagola statue. It looks like it is situated on the roadside but there is parking and entry into a gated complex. It is very close to the Veerebhadra Swamy temple and in fact you will see it first as you approach the temple from the Bengaluru Hyderabad highway.

The bull carved out of a single granite rock is magnificent in size and detail,

Be careful of the monkeys in the complex who will snatch any edibles out of your hands.
Written June 28, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

amitabh_kishore
Bengaluru, India147 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2021 • Family
One of the biggest Nandi Bull statues in the world. Well maintained. Parking available. No entry fees. Beside the statue park, there is a good restaurant by Andhra Tourism. Road to this statute from the highway is a breeze.
Written March 1, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sunshinecheer
Bangalore India88 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Once again the restless traveller in us saw us leave for Lepakshi at 6am. I had been there over 25 years ago, but Ranga had not and we decided to visit this temple on Sankranti.

Lepakshi is a town that is fighting a hard and brave battle against obscurity. Despite being a contemporary of its more famous cousin of the Vijayanagara dynasty, Hampi, Lepakshi lies lonely and forgotten at the border between Andhra Pradesh and Karnataka. A reference is made in the Skandapurana to Lepakshi as one of the hundred and eight important Shaiva Kshetras (pilgrimage centres for worshippers of Shiva) though it is hard to believe today that that this remote town was once a bustling centre for trade and pilgrimage.

Lepakshi today is like any other small dusty village lying 122 kms away from Bangalore. The town as such does not have any other attractions for tourists, but the temple, with its rich heritage makes it more than worth the trouble of visiting.
You have to take the Bangalore Hyderabad Highway: Bangalore - Yelahanka - Devanahalli - Chikkaballapur - Bagepalli - Lepakshi. You turn off NH7, exactly 6kms after the Bagepalli toll booth into a narrow road (supposedly a state highway - really??) leading to the temple. There are no signs, but you can ask for the Hindupur - Anantpur road. About 3 kms down this road is a sculpture of 2 storks, stick to the right road and continue on. It is 15kms from the main road to the temple. Just near the car park are shops, similar to those found outside temples everywhere, selling everything from puja items like flowers and coconuts and incense sticks to polyester saris and plastic buckets!

The presiding deity here is Veerabhadra Swamy, an irate form taken by Lord Shiva. According to our guide’s version, when Parvati died during Daksha yagna, Shiva struck with grief and rage threw a clump of his hair on to the earth and the spot where it fell now houses the temple and the statue of the lord( along with the udbhava murthy). And the statue of Parvati too wears a correspondingly sad and angry look. Indeed the entire temple abounds with legends about Shiva and Parvati and their royal wedding and separation later.

What is in a name? Plenty, it seems….
There are also ample stories floating in the air inside the temple walls about the other divine couple Rama and Sita, and in fact, one of them relates to the suggested origin of the name Lepakshi. It is believed that when Ravana kidnapped Sita, the brave bird Jatayu fought against the evil king and died in the battle on this spot. As it lay wounded, its wings cut off by Ravana, Lord Rama said with compassion, “le pakshi” (rise, o bird!) – and so, Lepakshi. Look out for the imprint of the giant footprint just outside the kalyanamantapa, believed to have been left by Sita herself!

The other and equally gory story about the name points to the brothers Veeranna and Virupanna, under King Achutaraya of the Vijayanagara dynasty. The latter who was treasurer of Penukonda province (today’s Anantpur) spared no expense to have the temple built the way he wished as a tribute to the Lord, as his mute son regained his speech after playing near the Udbhava moorthy of Shiva which was on this hillock, leading to suspicions from the king about embezzlement of money. In grief and in anticipation of royal punishment, Virupanna plucked out his own eyes and threw them against the wall, where the muted blood stains from centuries ago are believed to be visible even today. (By the way, the Government had these stains tested and has confirmed that they are indeed blood stains which refuse to be erased despite sevral tries! – Spooky, huh?!) And thus, lepa-akshi (blinded eyes).

For all the blood that seems to have been spilled within these walls, the temple today is a forlorn edifice amidst the brown and dry landscape of rural Andhra Pradesh. The only sign that all perhaps did not go well is that the temple is incomplete in many places, especially the kalyanamantapa that was being built when Virupanna died.
The Vijayanagara architecture style

The temple at Lepakshi has several characteristics that are unique to the Vijayanagara style of architecture – the most striking being giant monoliths; in Lepakshi the Nagalinga and the Nandi are both the largest such statues (other monoliths from the period being the Ganesha temples at Hampi and the Gomateshwara statue at Karkala).
You enter the temple at the Mukhyamantapa (main hall) directly into the natyamantapa (dancing hall) that is at the centre of the building and leads into the Garbagruha or the sanctum. This hall has pillars depicting divine musicians, Parvati dancing, Brahma on the cymbals and Surya on the nadaswaram and finally, Nataraja himself, leg raised in the classical nartana position. Walking along the side of the temple on the outer prahara, you then come to the giant statue of the seven-headed cobra Nagalinga and further down, Ganesha etched into the wall.

This walk leads to the other important structure within the building, also an essential element of Vijayanagara architecture, the open-air Kalyanamantapa (wedding hall). This Kalyanamantapa has been depicted as the site of the celestial wedding between Shiva and Parvati, and each of the pillars is a celebration of this – drummers and musicians adding to the atmosphere and lesser gods and goddesses blessing the couple. Close by stands the Latamantapa, with its 42 pillars, each carved with intricate motifs of birds and flowers, used to this day as designs on sari borders, and the reason why AP handicrafts chose this name.

At the Natyamantapa look up to find the most fascinating feature of the temple, the murals that adorn the ceiling. Although a lot of it has now been eroded by the harshness of time and neglect, the vibrant colors of natural vegetable and flower dyes still catch the eye of the visitor. Each of them depicts a story from mythology.

The Nandi
Half a kilometer from the temple, just by the road stands the statue of Nandi carved from red granite. It is 15 feet tall and 27 feet long. Yet for all its imposing size, the carving is intricate, especially the bells around the neck bearing the royal insignia of the Vijayanagara dynasty. And just like with Hampi, each stone, each pillar and wall has a story to tell, if only you have the time and patience to listen carefully. The temple here is built on a tortoise shaped hillock – kurmashaila; between all the straight lines and sharp angles of the walls and pillars, there is a smooth rounded rock (the back of the tortoise) in the outer prahara.

I believe there were 7 praharas but the temple land has now shrunk from 60 acres to about 2 acres thanks to human habitation and general care a damn attitude of all concerned. To the villagers it is just another temple, heritage - what's that? As I leave the temple, after collecting the hot Pongal prasadam subsequent to a long and well conducted Puja to the Lord and Devi Durga, I say a small prayer for this slow tortoise to finally win the race. For, what will make the authorities sit up and take notice of the decay facing this glorious temple town?
We left at 10.45am for our return home and reached back by 12.30pm.
Written January 20, 2010
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

sandeepbajaj
Bangalore3 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Lepakshi Temple (AP)
110 Km drive from bangalore to hindupur using devnahalli anantpur express highway.
its 500 yrs old historical lord shiva temple, and also india's biggest nandi bull statue, the temple consist of marvelous stone sculpture and design. Must visit temple in south.
Written May 8, 2010
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

shah_neil
Bengaluru, India44 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2011
Lepakshi is located about 125 Kms from bangalore. I live in Whitefield area and hence we took the bypass to the new airport. (we avoided the Hebbal route, by taking Whitefield station - NH4 - NH207 - NH7 (after new airport))
One important point is not to trust Nokai maps. It pointed me to a completely different place (which was 15 Kms beyond the actual location). The road condition is very good. The main attraction is the Veerbhadra temple which has historic Mural paintings on the ceiling in the main temple. Other attraction in the temple is the row of "Hanging Pillars" - yes they are really hanging.
Nearby the temple (on the same route - before the temple) is the World's biggest Nandi statue - 15 ft by 27 ft. Point to note: the road next to the Nandi statue is under construction and hence you can miss it while taking the bypass.
Overall, a good place to visit. You can start at 6 AM and get back by 1 PM
Written April 10, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

akansha_shekhar
Bengaluru, India81 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2012 • Family
"Lepakshi?!?What's that??"
That was everyone's first reaction.
We were told it was a historical site...and it didn't really interest us much...but as they say, never judge a book by its cover and a place by its name.

Lepakshi is the ideal weekend getaway for a Bangalorean.One can get up without the buzzing alarm clocks and yet make it on time to enjoy that place. It would take you a two and a half hour to three hour drive if you're with your friends, and a little more than that if you're with your family( you know why). Its a 120 km drive from Bangalore...and the drive is enjoyable...as soon as you're off the highway stretch, you reach the narrow village roads, which is suprsingly well maintained. Greenery on either sides, with the narrow lanes leading to the farmlands is sure to get you nostalgic.

It is advisable you leave at around 10-10.30 in the morning from Bangalore and you'll reach by 1.30-2.00. Have a hearty meal in Hindupur and proceed to the temple. Since its rocks all around, it wouldn't be hot by then and you will enjoy clicking away in the sunset.
We ate in Ginni's, a Punjabi restauraunt which served simple, spicy and delicious punjabi food in Hindupur. If you're in for authentic Andhra cuisine, there are many small messes and resteraunts that serve you the same...

After getting our energy dose, we set out for the temple. There were tour guides who took us around..and since we weren't familiar with the local language, the only means of communication was Hindi and English with a Telgu vocabulary.
The story of the place is very interesting....the mythology and village beliefs didnt give any way for scientific explanation.It is believed that Jatayu, when wounded was waiting at that spot for Ram...and hence the name "Lapakshi" or Rise...bird. We were told that the building was made of limestone, jaggery and egg shells!!
Shiva and Parvathi's "Kalyana Mandapa" was a fantastic interpretation of what the actual marriage would have been like. Other attractions were Sita's foot and the Huge food plate.The most interesting thing was the hanging pillar...it was a pillar that supported the whole complex, but was not attached to the base...one could pass their handkerchiefs through it. The enormous Shiva linga was also very pretty...and it is hard to believe that it was made in an hour by the workers!!
The Nandi Statue...the largest in the world, is very well maintained.The gardens are garbage-free and the work is well done.

If you want to make it to Lepakshi, you have to compromise on cleanliness and hygyine. There aren't many hotels around...and the drive throughs on the highway are not really upto the mark. There are stops like Kamat, but sadly we found cockroackes along with the food on the plate.The village lacks hotels and eating joints. One can't stay through the night, as there are barely any lodging facilities. The temple is untouched by the govt., but the villagers are doing a fairly good job. There is no promotion..and not many people know about this place.

So for all those travellers and photographers who wish to spend their weekend by doing something different, Lepakshi is where you ought to be. :D
Written August 20, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Pratap P
Bengaluru, India7 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2015 • Family
We visited Lepakshi on 3rd April. We started at 3PM and reached Lepakshi by 5:30 PM. Road was very good for entire stretch and it was breeze reaching the place. We reached just in time before temple closure, visited Veerabadraswamy temple first. After temple visit we took local guide help to show us the temple. Overall temple was great with historical background. It was amazing to see the sculptures which were 500 years old. Hanging pillar was great to understand the amazing architecture of the temple. Paintings on the ceiling were still visible even after so many centuries. Guide explained us about the history behind the temple and each mantapa. It was full moon day and we could visit Nandi in full moon light and it was amazing. We returned Bangalore by 10PM.

Overall - a amazing experience to visit and must visit place for history enthusiasts.
Written April 4, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Hariharan S
Bengaluru, India56 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2012
Lepakshi is a small village near hindpur, ap. This place has a beautiful temple dedicated to veerabhadraswamy. One of the largest bull statues is also found here.

Driving Directions from Bangalore:
From Bangalore take NH 7 towards Hyderabad. About 70 kms from Devenahalli is the Karnataka-AP state border. There is a toll booth just before you enter AP. As soon as you cross the border, take the first left turn after the AP RTO checkpost. There are boards showing direction to lepakshi. After the turn, you have to drive another 15 kms to reach lepakshi.

The temple is superb and the roof paintings in the temple is very intricate. Of course, a lot of painting are damaged due to poor maintenance. Around the temple is a large shiva linga carved out of rock. The sculptures and paintings are beautiful. Moreover, the place is very peaceful and typically you find very few tourists. Hence, its a perfect weekend family getaway.

There are very good restaurants in lepakshi. Finish your meal or pack food before you go there. If you are travelling from bangalore, you will find Kamat Hotel ( attached to BP petrol bunk) about 30kms from Devanahalli. You get resonably good meal here.
Written January 23, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Showing results 1-10 of 439
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

Lepakshi Bull

Frequently Asked Questions about Lepakshi Bull


Lepakshi Bull Information

Excellent Reviews

201

Very Good Reviews

212

Lepakshi Bull Photos

1,082