Sutton Scarsdale Hall
Sutton Scarsdale Hall
4
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Monday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Tuesday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
About
The imposing shell of a grandiose Georgian mansion built in 1724-29, with an immensely columned exterior. Roofless since 1919, when its interiors were dismantled and some exported to America, there is still much to discover within, including traces of sumptuous plasterwork. Adjacent to the parish church, Sutton Scarsdale Hall is set amid open grassed land, with beautiful views, sloping down toward a ha-ha ditch.There is a small car park, accessed via Hall Drive, a residential street. In Sutton Scarsdale village, between Chesterfield and Bolsover. Access is during daylight hours only. At other times, the gateway to Hall Drive may be closed. There are no public toilets. The Hall is closed for major conservation works. Access to the grounds is available, where the exterior of the Hall can be viewed.
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles132 reviews
Excellent
43
Very good
54
Average
29
Poor
6
Terrible
0

Hungry Mick
Newton Abbot, UK17 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2022
My grandfather bought this place but sought to sell off the roof, oak paneling to the USA and stones to houses in Chesterfield. English Heritage have fenced it off and the place is deserted. No workers around to restore the splendor to what it was. BUT FENCE IT OFF .. come on just open it up for people to imagine the splendor.
Written October 17, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you feedback. This dramatic 18th Century hilltop ruin of an imposing baroque mansion still retains remnants of its former rich plaster decoration. The Hall is between phases of a conservation project, with the whole of the building fenced off until these works are complete. Please note, this means that there is no access to the hall, but visitors are welcome to walk the gardens, and the exterior can be viewed. Due to a major conservation project, the interior will be inaccessible this year. We hope you visit again once the conservation is completed Nicky - English Heritage
Written November 1, 2022
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

GoingGuide
Nottingham, UK1,960 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2024 • Couples
A great place to stroll around and admire the views. Enjoyed finding out how the owners became bankrupt and tried to sell the property at a time when it was difficult around the time of the 1st World War. This led to the contents being sold to America, leaving an empty shell of a stately home. Set on a hill overlooking the M1 and Bolsover Castle. Free of charge. Worth a visit.
Written June 9, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Fry
Sheffield, UK81 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2021 • Couples
Took my other half here due to i haven't been here since i was a small child. It's a shame you cannot go into thè ruins at the moment but the architecture which you can see is still impressive and the info dotted around gives an indication of history to the place. The views of the hills around are great and its a good worth of ten minutes time. The church next door is also a good view!
Written April 10, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jess
2 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2021 • Solo
The hall itself is mainly ruins, but the views from there are amazing. It's so serene, I often go here when I'm on a break at work. I've seen dears running through the grounds and you can see for miles. Free parking right by the hall. If you were going just to see the hall it wouldn't take longer than 10 mins, but there's some lovely walks around the hall.
Written June 14, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Julie P
United Kingdom1,857 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2021
Somewhere you can see if travelling South along the M1 but actually visiting is a step back in time. Don't be put off by the private looking driveway, you can drive to the bottom where there is a car park for the hall and church.

Now owned by English Heritage, all that remains is the shell of a once grand house. It's currently fenced off for safety, with some plans to make it safe. There's not much to see from the fence - a few decorative columns and work around the windows, but acid rain is slowly eroding the carvings. There is a wonderful view back down the valley towards the M1 and Bolsover. There's also a church next door but it's only open occasionally. Plenty of notice boards give a history of the buildings.
Written May 4, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Eva T
United Kingdom2,342 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2022
Sutton Scarsdale Hall - we passed this place several times in the past. But this year we visited it with our friends for the first time - it's great when we have a lot to see around. And another plus is a great view from this spot. Nearby churchyard had some very interesting headstones.
Written September 3, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for visiting, we are pleased you enjoyed your visit. Sutton Scarsdale Hall has an imposing shell of a grandiose Georgian mansion built in 1724-29, with an immensely columned exterior. Roofless since 1919, when its interiors were dismantled and some exported to America, there is still much to discover within, including traces of sumptuous plasterwork. Adjacent to the parish church, Sutton Scarsdale Hall is set amid open grassed land, with beautiful views, sloping down toward a ha-ha ditch. More information regarding its history can be found on the English Heritage website. We hope you get the opportunity to visit other English heritage properties, there are several in the area including Bolsover Castle, Bolsover Cundy House and Hardwick Hall. Nicky - English Heritage
Written September 5, 2022
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Brian T
London, UK8,053 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2014 • Couples
Sutton Scarsdale Hall is one of a number outstanding heritage attractions to be found in relative close proximity in the northern quarter of Derbyshire around Chesterfield (alongside Bolsover Castle, Hardwick Hall, Hardwick Old Hall, Chatsworth House and Peveril Castle). But note from the outset that it's a wreck, a mere shell of the former glory that the stately home was in the 1700 s and 1800s. It's a part of the English Heritage collection, and it's free to visit. A good look around will only take an hour or so, but it's certainly worth a visit as the shell of the building is largely complete, apart from the roof. We visited on 18/10/2014. There's ample parking, but no facilities such as toilets, no shelter if it's raining, and no representative from the English Heritage is on site. There's not even a decent coffee shop nearby! It's open daily from 10:00am. There's a couple of information boards located around the site, but read up on its history (particularly its decline) before you visit. Remnants of the elaborate plaster stucco work can be seen in a couple of the rooms, fortunately fenced off to prevent further destruction (shame about the bits of graffiti on some of the walls). As a photographer I loved the site, and spent a couple of hours there taking advantage of some great photographic opportunities. I imagine it would be a popular spot for unusual wedding pictures! Bolsover Castle can be seen from the front of the house. A combination of the two sites would make a great day out!
Written October 18, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

nigelfreestuff
Derbyshire, UK3 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2016 • Solo
Most people are unfamiliar with the reason why this hall is in dis-repair.
The hall was purchased by an american millionare who's pet pastime was to buy historical english country houses and GUT THEM. The contents of these houses were then placed in containers and shipped to America. Most of which are still there in containers in storage. ROBBING VANDAL.
Written September 29, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nikki C
Norwich, UK67 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Friends
Free Parking, Free Entry, Beautiful, Interesting, Historical.
Sutton Scarsdale Hall is a sad, but beautiful sight indeed. It evokes quite an eery feel. Due to this, it brings such intrigue to its history and former grandeur. The building is owned by English Heritage and they are currently undertaking renovation works to make the structure safe, preserve certain features and renovate some of the stone work. You cannot currently access the “inside” of the building as it is protected by a fence, ensuring both the safety of the public and the building. There are information boards about the Hall, in various places in the grounds. There is also a wooded area and field, where we were able to walk our dog and provided to be a good stopping point for a picnic on the long drive back from the Lake District to Norfolk.
Written May 11, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Neil_in_Sheffield_UK
Sheffield, UK693 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2014 • Solo
This crumbling shell of a building is surely testament to the excesses of the gentry in the early eighteenth century. For the Fourth Earl of Scarsdale, money appeared to be no object. He brought in many skilled workers from stone masons to furniture makers and even experts in plasterwork - all the way from Italy. Meanwhile he exploited his staff, paying poverty wages while expecting the earth.

I would have liked to visit - St Mary's - the medieval church that existed on the site long before the new hall was conceived but the gate was padlocked and unusually there was no other way in.

Inheritors bore the crushing financial burden of the building's development and maintenance but by the early 1900's it was all too late. Some of the ornate interiors of Sutton Scarsdale Hall were exported to America. it is worth considering the fact that a much older "hall" existed on the site long before Nicholas Leke (4th Earl of Scarsdale) came along. The original Hall formed part of a Saxon estate owned by Wulfric Spott, who died in 1002 and left the estate to Burton-on-Trent Abbey.

From Sutton Scarsdale you get a great view across the valley of the River Doe Lea to Bolsover Castle which is also well worth a visit. It's so nice that it is free to walk around Sutton Scarsdale and there are no car park fees either.
Written March 4, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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