Osterio Magno
Osterio Magno
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3.0
16 reviews
Excellent
2
Very good
4
Average
7
Poor
1
Terrible
2

Sally62
Northampton, UK5,221 contributions
Sep 2019
We weren't able to go inside during our visit but it's worth stopping to take a look at the external architecture. Once a home to King Roger II, it then belonged to the Counts of Ventimiglia. The building with yellow sandstone and lava stripes dates back to C13th although it was built on an ancient Roman or Byzantine cistern - on this part you can see 2- mullioned windows. The tower with its 3-mullioned windows in the Chiaramontan style dates from C14th
Written February 7, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brun066
Florence, Italy12,485 contributions
Jul 2019
As it is well known, Cefalù experienced the maximum splendor in its history when it was designated as a place for the the splendid Duomo's building, as the church was to become the mausoleum of the Norman kings.
But this intention didn't last long: only during the reign of Roger II (1130-1154). Therefore Cefalù, while remaining important, saw the construction of the Cathedral slow down, and the founding of new important buildings weakened. So the appearance of the city is medieval more due to its urban plan than to the presence of buildings fully dating back to that era.
One of the few exceptions is the so-called "Osterio Magno".
Incorporated in later buildings, it can also go unnoticed to those walking along the "Corso Ruggero". However, if the visitor looks up, the elegance of the surviving building's windows and their astonishing two-color effect will surely hit him.
The architectural style of the building is evidently "chiaramontano", so named by the Chiaramonte family, the most powerful feudal family in the fourteenth century in Sicily. The greatest example of this architecture is the palace known as "Steri" in Palermo. Both the palace in Palermo and this one in Cefalù derive their name from the Latin word "hosterium", that is "fortified mansion".
Unfortunately the building was closed for restoration a few years ago and, even after the restoration work was completed, it was not reopened. We were therefore able to admire it only from the outside: that affects our rating.
Written August 7, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Matthew P
London, UK4,278 contributions
Apr 2023 • Couples
We went in and realised it was pointless, nothing really to see. Just save your money walk on by. The building from the outside looks nice.
Written April 6, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Osterio Magno - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)