Queen Charlotte's Cottage

Queen Charlotte's Cottage, Richmond-upon-Thames: Address, Phone Number, Queen Charlotte's Cottage Reviews: 4/5

Queen Charlotte's Cottage
4
Historic Sites • Architectural Buildings
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About
A most intimate royal palace, Kew was built as a private house in 1631 and used by the royal family between 1729 and1818, in conjunction with several other buildings nearby which no longer exist. In happier times, George III, Queen Charlotte and their 15 children enjoyed a relatively simple domestic routine at Kew. The palace rang with laughter and fun as family games and birthday celebrations provided the distractions from affairs of state. However, in later years the atmosphere darkened as family rivalries became more intense and relationships soured. Kew became a retreat for an ailing King George and a virtual prison for his elder unmarried daughters. The Royal Kitchens at Kew are a unique survival - a Georgian royal kitchen left untouched for 200 years, with many original features intact. They tell the story of the servants who worked in them - and evoke life on the 6th February 1789, the day George III was given back his knife and fork, after his first episode of ‘madness’. The nearby Queen Charlotte’s Cottage was built in 1770, and later enlarged and decorated as a fascinating cottage orné.
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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4.0
239 reviews
Excellent
106
Very good
93
Average
27
Poor
10
Terrible
3

leilei00009
United Kingdom92 contributions
May 2022
Well hidden cottage showing the simplicity of a royal cottage, is not in fact that simple. Love the in character staff who greet you at the entrance. It is a small venue and you go through it in a couple of minutes. Still lovely to visit the secluded corner of Kew Gardens.
Written May 8, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

itchyfeet2014
Glasgow, UK2,168 contributions
Apr 2022
Unfortunately closed so we couldn’t view the cottage inside. It is in a lovely secluded location and backs on to a pretty oak wood with lots of bluebells.

Worth the walk, and very envious of this charming picnic location for the royal family.
Written April 30, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Francis W
London, UK20 contributions
Aug 2012 • Couples
Along with Kew Palace and Queen Charlotte's Cottage, both delightful and evocative, one has now to include the fabulously atmospheric and beautifully conserved Royal Kitchens in the list of delights on offer within the Royal Botanic gardens. The ticket for Kew Palace covers this extra gem, and the visitor is in for a treat.

The costumed staff are enthusiastic and knowledgeable - pleasant, and without that frightful and almost hysterical glee with which some guides attack their victims these days. they answer questions intelligently, and if they don't know the answer, they find out. There is no shame in having to do so.

The kitchens benefit from having been preserved, rather than heavily restored, and are decorated in fabulous Georgian colours. Strategically placed broadsheets and pamphlets provide a wealth of information, and there are plenty of bits and pieces for the inquisitive punter to pick up and examine.

All in all, the modest entry fee for the Palace and Kitchen and Cottage is superb value, and the visitor to Kew Gardens really shouldn't begrudge the extra outlay. (Visit Queen Charlotte's Cottage in the late spring, at bluebell time, for the full enchantment to work its magic.)

The Gardens as a whole are a unique cultural experience in which one may easily spend the whole day. Highly recommended for many many many return visits.
Written September 19, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Liz
Michigan30 contributions
Sep 2013 • Friends
My friend and I visited Kew Gardens in September 2013. It’s an easy side-trip from London – the South West Train ex-London Waterloo Station takes 30 minutes or so. It’s a lovely short walk from the Kew station to the gates of Kew Gardens. Note that it’s best to take some food and/or drink with you, as the single food station inside the gates of the Gardens is quite expensive and its lines can be long. (There were several local food carts positioned outside the Kew train station, with lovely and varied offerings. Take advantage of them!) Kew Gardens themselves are just wonderful – I must have walked around its lake 3 times – enjoying the flora, fauna, and views. (Not to mention their delightful ducks! It was such a treat to hand-feed ‘wild’ life bread crumbs and fruit.) Kew is such a lovely way to spend the better part of a day in such a relaxed setting.
Written October 25, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Joe S
Joe S
London, UK284 contributions
Jul 2012 • Family
We had read a bit about the role of these houses in the complicated dynamic of the life of the royal family at the time of George III so we were not expecting grandeur or conspicuously wealthy displays. It was very interesting and easily worth about two hours. We also checked the pricing so did not feel ripped off. Kew gardens are always worth a wander and the setting of these two houses is peaceful and despite the approach to Heathrow still gives an insight into a way of life that we hear little about.
Written October 14, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

DC2florida
Washington, DC376 contributions
Jul 2011
The Palace and Cottage were stunning, as many of the Historic Royal Palaces are (Banqueting House the only exception). The refurbished rooms were amazing and provide a great insight into King George III and family. It was like stepping back in time, or into a film about the period. The contrast with the refurbished rooms and the top floor that was left as it was found is really something to see. The staff and volunteers were very friendly and informative for adults and children alike.

The Cottage is small, but very neat to see from the outside and inside. Nice how it just 'pops up' in the middle of the park.

The only drawback is that one has to pay the exorbitant entry fees for the Kew Gardens to access the Palace and Cottage. That makes this poor value for money, sad to say. Given that the Palace is on an edge bordering a public area along the Thames there really is no excuse for not having an entrance to the Palace only. This should at least be available to HRP members or something.
Written August 3, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Kam L
London, UK122 contributions
Apr 2017 • Solo
A great place to learn about Queen Charlotte and her family life as well as her lasting influence on Kew Gardens. This is the best place I know for seeing and photographing Bluebells at their best.
Written April 30, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Namewhatname
Paris, France33 contributions
Jun 2016 • Family
Queen Charlotte's cottage is a small one storey thatched building in Kew Gardens where Queen Charlotte liked to picnic. It is on the western side of Kew Gardens closest to Lion Gate (this is the closest gate to Richmond Station). It is only open from late spring to early autumn and usually only at weekends and bank holidays. However you can look through the windows. It's generally empty unless there is a special event.

It's a perfect place to see the bluebells in spring.

The photo of the red brick dutch style building shows Kew Palace, built by a Dutch merchant and later purchases by King George II. It was where King George III lived during his "madness". It is also in Kew Gardens and is close to the River Thames. Closest gates would probably be Victoria Gate if coming from Kew Gardens Station or Brentford Gate.
Written July 27, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

L B
London, UK90 contributions
May 2015 • Couples
I don't understand why both these attractions are in on heading - they are different parts of the site, so hard to review together but here goes. The cottage you can whizz around in a few minutes. It's worth finding as there is a lovely spot in front for a picnic, but not a vast amount of historical information inside, exquisite painted walls notwithstanding. The Palace was a different and much more interestingly presented place - lots about poor old King George III and his illness and his family, a fair few artefacts etc. - much more like a stately home. You can't bring back-packs (unless you hold them in front) so be advised, and the herb garden is a haven of tranquility beside it.
Written June 6, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

666Bunty
Surrey267 contributions
Aug 2014 • Friends
The surrounding gardens are fantastic. The buildings are small and intimate and worth a visit but its a double payment - once for the gardens and then for the Palace and Cottage together (NT members have to pay to get into Kew Gardens although the buildings are free to members)
Written December 30, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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