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Iron Age Farm

100 Reviews
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Iron Age Farm

100 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
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Ullandhaugveien 165, Stavanger 4021 Norway
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Stavanger: Waterfalls, Caves and Rock Tour By Sea
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Make the most of your time on shore in Stavanger by getting back out onto the water on this guided boat tour. Sail into the Lysefjord to soak up the scenery of mountains, waterfalls, and tiny islands, and see such world-famous attractions as Pulpit Rock (Preikestolen). Also visit Vagabond's Cave, which legend says was named after a group of vagabonds who hid there; see goats at summer pasture, and taste clear mountain water from the Hengjane falls.
$144.58 per adult
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Georg R wrote a review Nov 2020
1 contribution
The visit to the Iron Age Farm was fantastic! The staff there are super helpful and very friendly. The farm itself is beautifully made and transports you right back in time. You feel safe and at peace here. A must-see!
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Date of experience: December 2019
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nilslyseng wrote a review Aug 2020
Oslo, Norway96 contributions44 helpful votes
If you want a unique experience and go back in time. This is a destination for the ones who want to go back in time and see how people where looking. The only place in Norway, where they have built homes like in the iron-age. Where you see the fire-place, how they made butter and bread. You can really see how they lived. The guide is explaining and there is two open houses. One which is newly rebuilt with light and shows all the parts of the house. The old one is from the 1970s and is in a different state. So, you can see how scholars are considering people used to live. Which is a refreshing. We can recommend to spend time here. The cafe also have good food, even a traditional soup to a good price. The museum has a big shop and also a modern house to give more knowledge to houses. If you have bought tickets to the Arkeologiske museum in central. Then this was free and it is lasting for 48 hours. So, you can go one day in the one in central and travel to Iron Age farm the next day. Something we did.
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Date of experience: August 2020
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Ed D wrote a review Jul 2020
Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts99 contributions13 helpful votes
The Farm and museum were closed due to COVID-19, in that no guides were around, but the sheep are very much present and it's a delightful walk, looking at the exterior of the long houses and the scenery around the area from the top of the hill.
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Date of experience: May 2020
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enur1979 wrote a review Nov 2019
Stavanger, Norway396 contributions79 helpful votes
Our guide was a great storyteller and ensured that our visit gave us full value, combined with the new visitor center.
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Date of experience: December 2018
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Response from Arkeologisk mus... U, Public Relations Manager at Iron Age Farm
Responded Nov 26, 2019
Thank you so much for the good review. And happy to hear that the guide was a great storyteller:)
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mjshss2 wrote a review Nov 2019
Seaford, Delaware149 contributions22 helpful votes
Three of the four long houses have been restored in this area. It was interesting to hear the guide in period costume tell about how the animals lived in the most Northern part of the building, because it was the coldest part. Their body heat helped to warm up the rest of the long house for humans, but unfortunately, the smells traveled back too. There were also fires lit in the center of the long house, for warm and cooking. She discussed their diet, dyes for their clothing and many other aspects of life in the Iron Age. Then, you could walk around the property on your own. Very interesting glimpse of life in the 4th and 5th Centuries AD.
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Date of experience: October 2019
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Response from Arkeologisk mus... U, Public Relations Manager at Iron Age Farm
Responded Dec 2, 2019
Thank you. Happy to notice that you really learned from the details Our guide told you :) Hope to see you again.
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