Schubert's death house in Vienna

Schubert's death house in Vienna

Schubert's death house in Vienna
3
Speciality MuseumsHistoric Sites
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
What people are saying
Master Jonjon
By Master Jonjon
Jonjon's official review: Schubert Memorial Apartment
3.0 of 5 bubblesJul 2019
LIVING HERE. Schubert moved here to live with his brother in 1828. His health had long been deteriorating even before the move and in only two and a half months he passed away on typhoid fever. EXHIBITION SPACE. This is a smaller flat than his birthplace and may reveal what has come to be of his later years. It’s flat 17 on the second floor – you can see the other tenants watching TV as you walk along the corridor. (This truly is conservation in practice, where a museum blends in as the building continues to serve its original purposes.) Upon entry the staffer will hand you a catalogue. It introduces every item in the exhibition and something more – the black-and-white booklet covers both attractions, his birthplace and here. (And hence while my memory of a few hours ago is starting to fade, finally I’m given a sense of what the previous exhibition is about.) The three rooms here go through his final months and the memorial services and arrangements following his death. Do check out the last letter he has written, which explains his illness and how he has been living in these difficult times. (In the last room, you can find a drawing of the church that held his memorial service. This unlocks another place-to-go if you’re interested in memorial plagues and monuments.) LIVING HERE. Schubert moved here to live with his brother in 1828. His health had long been deteriorating even before the move and in only two and a half months he passed away on typhoid fever. EXHIBITION SPACE. This is a smaller flat than his birthplace and may reveal what has come to be of his later years. It’s flat 17 on the second floor – you can see the other tenants watching TV as you walk along the corridor. (This truly is conservation in practice, where a museum blends in as the building continues to serve its original purposes.) Upon entry the staffer will hand you a catalogue. It introduces every item in the exhibition and something more – the black-and-white booklet covers both attractions, his birthplace and here. (And hence while my memory of a few hours ago is starting to fade, finally I’m given a sense of what the previous exhibition is about.) The three rooms here go through his final months and the memorial services and arrangements following his death. Do check out the last letter he has written, which explains his illness and how he has been living in these difficult times. (In the last room, you can find a drawing of the church that held his memorial service. This unlocks another place-to-go if you’re interested in memorial plagues and monuments.)

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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Wieden
The fourth district combines elegant tradition with contemporary style and relaxed living. More than a dozen town palaces and churches such as St. Charles Borromeo have added glamour to a neighborhood known for its traditional retail and crafts shops, taverns, cafés. Wieden is also home to Naschmarkt, Vienna’s largest street market. Many bohemian types have found their way to Wieden: meet them in trendy cafés and bars, shop alongside them for vintage items, enjoy Wien Museum’s and Kunsthalle’s modern temporary exhibitions, and hang out with the bees at Vienna’s most beautiful urban garden, Karlsgarten.
How to get there
  • Kettenbrückengasse • 4 min walk
  • Pilgramgasse • 8 min walk
Reach out directly

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


3.0
3.0 of 5 bubbles6 reviews
Excellent
0
Very good
3
Average
2
Poor
0
Terrible
1

fisher_eye_lens
Campbell River, Canada617 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2016 • Solo
Although not as detailed a museum as the birth home in Nussdorf, the fact that it was Schubert's last home, in the time that he continued to write his final great works, makes this a poignant place to visit. It is something to look out the window of the room and walk the streets of the districft where Schubert spent his last days.
I have a photo from the museum if anyone is interested.
Written September 29, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Master Jonjon
London, UK340 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019
LIVING HERE. Schubert moved here to live with his brother in 1828. His health had long been deteriorating even before the move and in only two and a half months he passed away on typhoid fever.

EXHIBITION SPACE. This is a smaller flat than his birthplace and may reveal what has come to be of his later years. It’s flat 17 on the second floor – you can see the other tenants watching TV as you walk along the corridor.

(This truly is conservation in practice, where a museum blends in as the building continues to serve its original purposes.)

Upon entry the staffer will hand you a catalogue. It introduces every item in the exhibition and something more – the black-and-white booklet covers both attractions, his birthplace and here.

(And hence while my memory of a few hours ago is starting to fade, finally I’m given a sense of what the previous exhibition is about.)

The three rooms here go through his final months and the memorial services and arrangements following his death. Do check out the last letter he has written, which explains his illness and how he has been living in these difficult times.

(In the last room, you can find a drawing of the church that held his memorial service. This unlocks another place-to-go if you’re interested in memorial plagues and monuments.)

LIVING HERE. Schubert moved here to live with his brother in 1828. His health had long been deteriorating even before the move and in only two and a half months he passed away on typhoid fever.

EXHIBITION SPACE. This is a smaller flat than his birthplace and may reveal what has come to be of his later years. It’s flat 17 on the second floor – you can see the other tenants watching TV as you walk along the corridor.

(This truly is conservation in practice, where a museum blends in as the building continues to serve its original purposes.)

Upon entry the staffer will hand you a catalogue. It introduces every item in the exhibition and something more – the black-and-white booklet covers both attractions, his birthplace and here.

(And hence while my memory of a few hours ago is starting to fade, finally I’m given a sense of what the previous exhibition is about.)

The three rooms here go through his final months and the memorial services and arrangements following his death. Do check out the last letter he has written, which explains his illness and how he has been living in these difficult times.

(In the last room, you can find a drawing of the church that held his memorial service. This unlocks another place-to-go if you’re interested in memorial plagues and monuments.)
Written August 7, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

pwrquilter
16 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2017 • Couples
Schubert is a distant relative of mine so I wanted to come here. The person taking our money (tho it was free on the ViennaPass) showed no interest In us as visitors. When I asked for a guide In English, he pretty much opened a book and threw it at me. All we saw were three rooms, with no real explanations. The Mozart house was much better. I wish we had time to go to schuberts birth house. I think that would have been much more informative. In all, the most disappointing activity of our visit to Vienna.
Written September 6, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Schubert's death house in Vienna

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