Margiani's House Museum
Margiani's House Museum
5
What people are saying
Сорокин Евгений
By Сорокин Евгений
Музей дает представление о том, как жили сваны на протяжении многих веков.
5.0 of 5 bubblesSep 2022
Now it is probably the most famous Svan house-museum in Mestia. The Margianis seem to have once been an influential Svan family, which owned eight towers at once. Now, let’s say, the museum complex includes a tower and quite a lot of buildings, attached to one another and representing a Svan house. The museum is located on a mountain and it is difficult to get to it, since you have to climb this mountain. The street leading there is completely paved with stone, but along its entire length there is a very steep climb. It seemed to me that the slope was about 40-45 degrees or close to that, and the walk was more than two hundred meters. We entered the museum at the end of work. Everything there generally feels like home. One employee in one person is a tour guide, a cashier, a ticket controller, and a caretaker. In our case, there was a young guy about thirty years old who said that he was kind of in charge here. In general, you pay him money and he talks about what is there. The Svan house itself consists of two floors. On the lower one, which is called "machub", the entire Svan family lived in winter. This is a large rectangular hall in ancient times with one narrow window for the smoke to escape from the fireplace, so the room was always twilight. Now, of course, several windows have already been broken through. In the center of the hall there is an open fireplace. In theory, there should be a stone slab hanging above it to protect the ceiling from burning out, but here it was apparently removed. It also had a battery function. It heated up from the fire, and the heat from the stone warmed the house as it cooled. The Svans did not have stoves. Around the hearth, but not along the walls, there are wooden benches or such sofas with backs, and at the head is a wooden carved chair of the eldest man in the family or clan. Along the perimeter of the larger hall along the walls there are wooden partitions with arched openings. Behind them were livestock, and in front of them were livestock feeders (nurseries). Cows, sheep and goats could stick their heads through arched openings or openings and, it turns out, were also present in the family society of the Svans sitting near the hearth. Further, above the stall there are wooden bunks or beds where people slept. Thus, there were animals below and heat came from them. On the second floor of the house (above the machuba) hay and other feed for livestock were stored in the winter, and in the summer members of the Svan family usually slept. Svanski Doim is such a unique museum. You simply find yourself in a room where almost all the furnishings are original and quite old or ancient, but there are no actual exhibits with explanatory inscriptions. This is, as they say now, an atmospheric place. You feel like you are practically in the Middle Ages, which suddenly appears around you. The inspection does not take much time, but you should walk around and touch it. There are also utility rooms with feed boxes and qvevri jugs dug into the ground. Near the house itself there is an observation deck, which offers a beautiful view of Mestia lying below in the valley, as well as the surrounding mountain ranges. The tower, open to the public, stands alone and is not connected to the house. Svans never lived in towers. I don’t remember how many floors there are in the tower. There are definitely seven floors there, but you enter the tower from the second, where a wooden staircase leads from the ground along the outer wall. In general, it was not very difficult to climb to the top of the Margiani Tower. The tower's ceilings are wooden. Each floor has a hole punched through it, through which the floors are connected to each other using wooden stairs. The stairs between floors are quite comfortable (slanted and the steps are flat), and the openings are quite large. The exit holes from the floor down and up are located in opposite corners of the tier room (diagonally) to avoid through penetration by attackers. On the last tier of the tower there is a combat and observation deck. However, at the top the tower is covered with a gable roof, although it is dilapidated, and the view from the upper platform is not very good. There are loopholes, but they are narrow with thick walls and are covered from above with a stone canopy, so you can only look down through them.

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Lanchvali Street, Mestia 3200 Georgia

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Samarets Kateryna-гид в Грузии
Batumi, Georgia245 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019
ПРиходите в музей, дорога очень нелегкая, чтобы подняться вверх с непривычки, но это однозначно стоит вашего внимания.
Экспонаты с 14 века, но самое главное-это рассказ о быте и жизни сванов прекрасной и очень интересной женщиной, хозяйкой музея, Ларисой.
Без посещения музея нельзя уезжать из Местия. Это точно!
Written November 5, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Сорокин Евгений
Veliky Novgorod, Russia5,677 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2022 • Friends
Now it is probably the most famous Svan house-museum in Mestia. The Margianis seem to have once been an influential Svan family, which owned eight towers at once. Now, let’s say, the museum complex includes a tower and quite a lot of buildings, attached to one another and representing a Svan house.
The museum is located on a mountain and it is difficult to get to it, since you have to climb this mountain. The street leading there is completely paved with stone, but along its entire length there is a very steep climb. It seemed to me that the slope was about 40-45 degrees or close to that, and the walk was more than two hundred meters.
We entered the museum at the end of work. Everything there generally feels like home. One employee in one person is a tour guide, a cashier, a ticket controller, and a caretaker. In our case, there was a young guy about thirty years old who said that he was kind of in charge here. In general, you pay him money and he talks about what is there.
The Svan house itself consists of two floors. On the lower one, which is called "machub", the entire Svan family lived in winter. This is a large rectangular hall in ancient times with one narrow window for the smoke to escape from the fireplace, so the room was always twilight. Now, of course, several windows have already been broken through.
In the center of the hall there is an open fireplace. In theory, there should be a stone slab hanging above it to protect the ceiling from burning out, but here it was apparently removed. It also had a battery function. It heated up from the fire, and the heat from the stone warmed the house as it cooled. The Svans did not have stoves.
Around the hearth, but not along the walls, there are wooden benches or such sofas with backs, and at the head is a wooden carved chair of the eldest man in the family or clan.
Along the perimeter of the larger hall along the walls there are wooden partitions with arched openings. Behind them were livestock, and in front of them were livestock feeders (nurseries). Cows, sheep and goats could stick their heads through arched openings or openings and, it turns out, were also present in the family society of the Svans sitting near the hearth.
Further, above the stall there are wooden bunks or beds where people slept. Thus, there were animals below and heat came from them.
On the second floor of the house (above the machuba) hay and other feed for livestock were stored in the winter, and in the summer members of the Svan family usually slept.
Svanski Doim is such a unique museum. You simply find yourself in a room where almost all the furnishings are original and quite old or ancient, but there are no actual exhibits with explanatory inscriptions. This is, as they say now, an atmospheric place. You feel like you are practically in the Middle Ages, which suddenly appears around you. The inspection does not take much time, but you should walk around and touch it.
There are also utility rooms with feed boxes and qvevri jugs dug into the ground.
Near the house itself there is an observation deck, which offers a beautiful view of Mestia lying below in the valley, as well as the surrounding mountain ranges.
The tower, open to the public, stands alone and is not connected to the house. Svans never lived in towers. I don’t remember how many floors there are in the tower. There are definitely seven floors there, but you enter the tower from the second, where a wooden staircase leads from the ground along the outer wall.
In general, it was not very difficult to climb to the top of the Margiani Tower. The tower's ceilings are wooden. Each floor has a hole punched through it, through which the floors are connected to each other using wooden stairs. The stairs between floors are quite comfortable (slanted and the steps are flat), and the openings are quite large. The exit holes from the floor down and up are located in opposite corners of the tier room (diagonally) to avoid through penetration by attackers.
On the last tier of the tower there is a combat and observation deck. However, at the top the tower is covered with a gable roof, although it is dilapidated, and the view from the upper platform is not very good. There are loopholes, but they are narrow with thick walls and are covered from above with a stone canopy, so you can only look down through them.

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Written August 30, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Margiani's House Museum - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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