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Portianos Military Cemetery

10 Reviews
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Portianos Military Cemetery

10 Reviews
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saronic wrote a review Jul 2019
Zurich, Switzerland18,596 contributions1,840 helpful votes
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Lemnos played an important role in the history of the ill-fated Gallipoli campaign. Especially thanks to the large Bay of Moudros the island was used as a base, from where troops of the Entente powers were sent on ships to fight on the Turkish peninsula of Gallipoli. Many soldiers then were sent back here to recuperate from injuries or illnesses and a lot of them died here. Two military cemeteries - one at Moudros, one at the village of Portianos - are reminders of this event. Many of the soldiers were members of ANZAC, the Australian New Zealand Army Corps, and the road leading up to the cemetery, past the Orthodox Church of 'Ta Eisodia tis Theotokou', is called 'ANZAC Street'. The cemetery is very well kept and lined up in several rows are the similar looking tombstones of 352 soldiers. An information board gives more details. A serene place, where each visitor will follow his own thoughts. At the main road before the cemetery is an attractive neoclassical house, which was a command center during this period, lasting from Feb 2015 till Jan 2016. The mastermind behind the Gallipoli campaign, the then 41 years old Winston Churchill as First Lord of Admiralty, also spent some time in this house, which today gets used as an 'Agence Consulaire de France' (not open to visitors). In the village of Portianou is also a Folkloric Museum (open 10am-2pm, except Mondays), where one has to follow a 15minutes guided tour in Greek or English.
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Date of experience: September 2018
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kixars wrote a review Jan 2019
Melbourne, Australia158 contributions63 helpful votes
We wanted to pay our respects to all the fallen soldiers, especially the ANZAC's. It was a very moving and emotional visit with lots of soldiers laid to rest here. It has been set up very well and in immaculate condition. Great work to the people that look after and run this place. A must see when in Lemnos.
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Date of experience: July 2018
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Phillip D wrote a review Aug 2017
Melbourne, Australia50 contributions13 helpful votes
Lemnos played such an important role during world war 1. All Australian soldiers who took part in the Gallipoli battle left on ships that departed from this island. They trained here and prepared for what was an absolute massacre. The injured came back here. Those who died from their injuries where buried on Lemnos in 2 cemeteries, one in Moudros and the other, here in Pourtianou. This cemetery is an ideal spot to pay respect for those who sacrificed their lives for our freedom. Lest we forget.
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Date of experience: August 2017
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Jean T wrote a review Jul 2017
Guildford, United Kingdom137 contributions112 helpful votes
We have visited many WW1 graveyards so this was a must on our visit to the island. Moving as always, and beautifully maintained as they all are.
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Date of experience: July 2017
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Michael P wrote a review Jul 2017
Tagaytay, Philippines1,396 contributions328 helpful votes
Our Taste of Lemnos tour, filled with Prinsendam seasoned cruisers, has brought us here to this field of memories. It is a beautiful field where children should be playing or sheep should be grazing. These men so far from their homes came here to answer their countries call a century ago. The people of Limnos have kept this field of honor in impressive grace. We walked among their stones and tried to understand how different their lives were from ours. The military titles of their different positions seemed as strange to me as the new titles of today’s military. It really was a somber experience reading the words “Far from his home he lies at rest and strangers tend his grave”. If we strangers don’t stop and visit, who will so far from his home?
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Date of experience: October 2016
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