Aigai

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YelnatsTM
Eastsound, WA30 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2011 • Couples
Location & Discovery. Vergina is a village in Imathia 12 KM from Veroia and 75 KM west of Greece's largest city: Thessaloniki. Within the ruins of the ancient city of Aigai the tombs are found. Aigai was a recent discovery in archaeological history: 1977-1978 by Greek archaeologist Manolis Andronikos whose contributions are discussed in the museum's concluding exhibits. The site had escaped identification because it was covered by a tumulus ((13 M X 110 M) probably built during the early 3rd century to protect it from the pillaging Galati. The royal intent of secretly secluding the graves and their contents was successful into millenniums.
The ancient city of Aigai was the capital of the Macedonian kings. The city parameters incorporated a cemetery that included tombs of the royal dynasty, notably, King Philip II (the father of Alexander the Great) and a youthful prince, Alexander IV.
The Macedonian Royal Tombs are the archives for Philip II of Macedonia and his contemporary culture. His achievements unfold throughout the visit.
WHO WAS PHILIP II OF MACEDONIA?
Approximately 350 BC, Philip II unified Macedonia. His background emerged from a Greek upbringing. He organized an army and conquered less civilized adjacent peoples, then proceeded to overcome the dis-unified Greek city-states. He died before he was able to implement plans to conquer Persia to the east. In 334 BC, his youthful Greek educated son and successor, Alexander, crossed the Hellespont into Asia. Through successful battles, he became master of Asia as far as the Persian Empire had dominated lands. Thusly, the largest world empire to date was created. The foundations for the major world conquest were rooted in a Greek antiquity past.
LOGISTICS FOR A VISIT.
LOCATION: Locate the small town: Vergina. There sign postings for the museum.
PARKING: Spaces immediately in front of the site are minimal. The town is rural. There did not appear to be parking restrictions. Park & walk is easy.
TICKETS: The booth is within the subterranean area of the fenced grounds. The entrance to the tombs is easily identifiable once the grounds are entered. There is an entrance gate.
TIMING: We arrived early and completed our tour in approximately one hour. Large groups of school children were arriving as we exited from the tombs to tour the grounds. The presence of active, noisy children returned the focus to the present. Suggestion: visit early.
THE SETTING: The grounds are sublime. Grassy mounds interspersed with occasional trees are easily navigated on dirt paths. One premise extremity displays marble ruins, former architectural elements. Another, the guard dogs who presumably patrol nocturnally. Beware, as their barks are ferocious, however, they can cause no harm as they are contained in their houses.
THE SUBTERRANEAN INTERIOR GALLERIES: The tombs and galleries are located in the ancient revered subterranean area. The tombs---en situ---are lighted to enhance the visitor's view.
Written October 8, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

OperaBeginner
London, UK54 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2015 • Solo
I visited all the main historical sites in Greece last summer – Athens and the Acropolis and Temple of Poseidon, Delphi, Corinth, Mycenae, Olympia, Thermopylae, but none, none compared to the Museum of the Royal Tombs of Aigai. None of them, all together. Instead of a collection of stones, requiring you to see these sites more in your mind than before you, here you could almost touch the past.

To be able to go down into the ground and stand before the tomb of Phillip of Macedon; to see the painted decorations on its front, the colours still visible after 2,000 years; to be able to get to within a few feet of the flagstones over which Alexander the Great walked, what wonders!

And the objects found in Phillip’s tomb; to see, for the first time, objects I’ve only seen in photographs: the gold box within which Phillip’s bones were laid – how small it is; the enormous bronze household objects, such as bowls and dishes, used to wash his body, now all turned green; his armour – from the size of it, you would think it was for an adolescent boy, not a man; the remains of his funeral pyre...

The museum is in the shape of a burial mound and the lighting inside is low but sufficient to see everything. It is not a large museum (there is another museum on the site but it was closed on the day I visited – how typically Greek!) and there are objects from other tombs, e.g. the silverware of a prince of the Macedon royal family – so beautiful and modern, you think you could buy it today.

And – in the middle of August – the museum was empty! No crowds to get in the way. I don’t know how you would get here without a car but try.

Thank the heavens they don’t allow photographs: use your eyes and, more importantly, your knowledge of history and your soul to wonder at how close the past is when you can stand so close to its buildings and the possessions of the immortals.
Written April 8, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dedun69
Illinois147 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2012 • Family
The city and description behind the history of this monument does it no justice. The discovery rivals that of King Tut. The tombs themselves have the museum built around them which is unique and gives it a sense of pomp. Shame that this museum does not get more visits. It is definitely worth the trip and its artifacts are beautiful. The video at the end is a must see. The only troubling this about this museum is the reference of Hades as Pluto. While Greeks have referred to Hades as Plouton and Plouton is known to Romans as Hades, for the sake of consistency, they should Hades since this is the name used in the movie at the museum.
Written July 8, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

daesquiv
San Jose, Costa Rica638 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019
This is a lovely quiet small town with a lot of history. We stayed here when we came to see King Phillip’s Tomb and we were very pleased with the energy of the town, there are a number of cafes and restaurants in the center as well as places to stay. We stayed at Olympia Guest house just about 100 meters away from the Museum of the Royal Tombs of Aigai (King Phillip’s Tombs)…see separate reviews for these two places.

Getting to Vergina is very easy if you come by Car, and in my opinion it does not make a lot of sense not to rent a car since from Vergina you can go to Pella, where is located the ancient site of Alexander about 1 hour drive away.

The archaeological site of Ancient Aigai located a couple of hundred meters away from the Tombs is closed to the public (it seems to be open Mon-Wed for a few hours) and here is where Philip was killed in the theater.

If you are a history lover you need to come here and go to Pella…you will not be disappointed.
Written September 13, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Roland B
Zurich, Switzerland1,802 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Couples
see my entry for the Museum of Thombs in Vergina to get information how to visit this amazing site by public transport from Thessaloniki.
Written May 13, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Superkatt
Sweden6,738 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2014 • Couples
There is a museum in Vergina, built in form of an ancient tumulus inside a large earth mound, unfortunately it is forbidden to take photos in here. In this museum can be seen 4 tombs of Macedonian kings, the most famous of them is Tomb of Philip II, father of Alexander the Great, and one small temple, a Heroon. Tombs are colonnaded with nice wooden doors, and looks like small temples placed under ground. As well can be seen many of grave findings, lot of them in gold, among them a gold larnax with the Vergina Sun, or a Macedonian Star, on the lock, the symbol of Macedonia.
Museum is interesting to see, but gives a somewhat depressive feeling because of all darkness. Anyway it is a must-see once.
Nearby, near Pieria Mountains , between villages Vergina and Palatitsia is situated an Archaeological Site of Aigai, the capital of Macedonia until the 4th C BC. There are the ruins of two Royal Palaces with best Macedonian mosaics in situ, on the Acropolis of Aigai, as well as ancient Theatre, Temple of Eukleia and Sanctuary of Mother of the Gods, (mistress of animals), mother and virgin at the same time.
Unfortunately, the Site was closed until further notice, and it is unclear when and if it can be visited. Pity.
Written February 25, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Svetla H
Sofia, Bulgaria35 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2014 • Solo
Vergina is a village in Northern Greece in the foothills of Mt. Pieria some 75 km from Thessaloniki. It is the location of the ancient capital of the Macedonians, called Aigai which had its heydays during the Archaic and Classic periods 7th through 4th centuries B.C.
The Palace of Philip II (Father of Alexander the Great) at Aigai is the biggest and (together with the Parthenon) the most important building of Classical Greece. You can visit also the site of the Royal Tombs, considered to be one of the most important archaeological discoveries of last century in Greece .
For those interested in ancient history Vergina is a great destination. I visited it twice and noticed that due to extended excavation every new visit can surprise you with some recently discovered artifacts.
Written August 9, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ken Q
Denver, United States827 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2022
Fascinating site and very interesting history. Worth a visit if you are in northern Greece. Easy to walk around.
Written February 25, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

gentbrugg
Moscow2,283 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Friends
Now in Vergina (namely it is located on the site of the former Aigai, the former capital of ancient Macedonia before Pella, and the place where Philip, the father of Alexander the Great, was killed) the museum-bunker represents great interest. It's one of the best in Greece. Some of the exhibits would find their place in the largest museum collections. This is not surprising - in the Aigai were buried members of the macedonian Royal family. However, there are serious disadvantages for tourists visiting Vergina. Firstly, it is a rather rare regular transport from Veria, which is located 17 kilometers from the it and from which it is easier to get to Thessaloniki. Secondly, the darkness in the halls of the museum - only the exhibits are highlighted. And thirdly, it is forbidden here to photograph. It is difficult to understand - the vast majority of exhibits are behind glass.
Written July 3, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Inspiration544723
1 contribution
5.0 of 5 bubbles
The museum was extraodinary as long as the exhibits,it was a great experience and if i had the chance i would visit it once more!!!
Written August 16, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Aigai, Central Macedonia

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