Archaeological Site and Museum of Eleusis

Archaeological Site and Museum of Eleusis

Archaeological Site and Museum of Eleusis
4
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Monday
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Friday
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Saturday
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM
Sunday
8:30 AM - 3:30 PM

Top ways to experience Archaeological Site and Museum of Eleusis and nearby attractions

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles180 reviews
Excellent
84
Very good
66
Average
23
Poor
2
Terrible
5

Ron S
New York City, NY5,471 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
The museum was closed due to the lack of staff. The site is cluttered with marble pieces which some museums would be proud to place on display. Here they are strewn about the site grounds exposed to the elements. And these people want their Parthenon marbles back.... Very little signage, so do some reading before you visit.

P.S. to all dog lovers: there at least two stray dogs on this site. They are very friendly. It looks like the staff feed them. They don't look particularly malnutritioned but they ask for food anyway. We did not expect that as it was our first stop after Athens (there are no stray dogs in Athens) so we had nothing to give them. Buy some dog food or cold cuts or cheese if you want to help these poor creatures.
Written February 12, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rachel N
USA219 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022
Visiting the site of the Eleusinian Mysteries was my #1 goal in Athens. The site is very cool but unfortunately much of it is roped off right now, seemingly for no reason, and the museum is also closed. It was still very nice to visit, though, especially as we were one of just two visiting couples when we dropped by.
Written October 9, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AlainD653
Manchester, UK47 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2013 • Solo
A beautiful underrated place, easy to get to cheaply from central Athens. Just head for Square Platia Eleftherias, north west of Monastiraki and get on buses either A16 or B16 and you'll get there within 30 minutes usually. It is the terminus so you can't miss it and street signs will guide you. Despite the ugliness of the suburb and big discount stores on the way, the bus will follow the Sacred Way as people did 2500 years ago on foot to get there. The site and its museum are special with little visitors and the odd school party. There are a few good cafes in the area and despite industry lurking around, it is not really visible from any point during your visit.
Written May 20, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

walterpres
Athens, Greece75 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2012 • Friends
Classics enthusiast (or not ) should spend the 40 minutes drive time from the center of Athens to pay Ancient Eleusis a visit. If you're looking up reviews about the site you are most likely aware of how important, and well, mysterious the whole place was/is. To be honest, I wasn't expecting the site to be so large. I wasn't even expecting it to be so impressive, mainly due to the fact that there are oil refiners/factories surrounding this precious site.
When entering the site the east and west propyleaon are worth checking out as they model Harian's Arch in Athens. Near the ruins of the east arch is the well where Demeter was. One can hardly miss the huge head that most believe to be that of M. Aurelius (an initiate of the mysteries him self). Getting up to the church on the hill gives one a better idea what the Telesterion, and the site as a whole, would have looked like.
The wooden steps at the end of the site led to the museum. The museum is quite small, but there are some interesting artifacts to look at, one being a giant pro-attic vase which stands about 6 ft. tall, and the models of the different phases that the site went through are worth noting. The museum stage is taken by a beautiful bust of a large Cariyatids. In the museum they have books of the site for as low as 4 euros (I bought one).
Once exiting the museum its probably best to go down a path that follows the wall that was protecting this ancient city. To do this just go right when going down the wooden steps that go up to the museum. This path will take you through a type of ancient residential area and bring you back to the main entrance/exit of the site. I should also mention, because it was such a big help, that I found a lot of photos and useful information on the yotoursgreece website/blog. My last tip is If your going in the summer please wear sun screen and go early as there isn't a lot of shade.
Written May 28, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Giorgos Sardelis
Athens, Greece133 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2020
General information- I visited the ancient site of Eleusis at the beginning of October 2020. It is approximately half an hour from the Northern suburbs of Athens via Attica Tollway (Attiki Odos). The museum was closed due to some construction works. The ticket for one adult was 6 Euros, while the kids enjoyed free entrance. Parking your car might be problematic.

Why you should visit it? - If you think about it Eleusis was one of the most important locations of the ancient Greek civilaztion, yet today it is more or less forgotten. It was there that The Great Eleusinian Mysteries were held every year for the cult of Demeter and Persephone

Very little is known for this cult, since the participants were bonded with oaths of secrecy. The cult predates the written history and lasted until the Roman emperor Theodosius I, who closed the sanctuaries by decree during the Persecution of pagans in the late Roman Empire in 392 AD. The last remnants of the Mysteries were wiped out in 396 AD, when Arian Christians under Alaric, King of the Goths, destroyed and desecrated the old sacred sites.

Until then most of the Greek and Roman known kings, generals, emperors, philosophers etc were initiated into them.

If you don't use a guide, make sure that you have read enough, in order to know on what holy stones you are stepping.
Written October 9, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ITRELFRENDe
Brussels, Belgium8 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2013 • Family
As far as antique sites are concerned, Eleusis is top of the list. It is the home of the worship to Goddess Dimitra (Demeter or Ceres in Latin), a symbol of Mother Nature and the circle of seasons. Her daughter Persephone had to spend part of the year in the underworld, near her husband Ades, god of the dead. So, look out for the Ploutonion (other name of Ades was Pluto), a cave through which she was supposed to disappear in the world of the dead. The Museum has invaluable objects (burrial offerings in childrens' graves are really amazing, don't miss the terracotta baby boots or the feeding bottles!).

The little church in the archeological site is dedicated to Our Lady of the Harvests :-)

As far as the surrounding area goes, well one can't miss the tragic destiny of this holy place, now surrounded by factories (rf. N.Gatsos Poem & M. Hadjidakis Song sung by Melina Mercouri: The Nighmare of Persephone).
Negative point: opening hours, from 8:00am to 15:am.
Entrance 4 euros March 2013 Children, students, seniors free,
Written April 12, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nemesis🇬🇷
Athens, Greece6,479 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Solo
One of the most important archaeological sites in Greece with great monuments and important history . During the ancient times were considered sacred space as taking place the Eleusinian mysterious
Written May 27, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Suzanne C
Whitstable, UK28 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2014 • Couples
For someone not particularly interested in the Eleusinian mysteries or ancient Greece, they may be disappointed. There is not a lot to see here and a very small museum. However if you know a little or have heard of it, I cannot recommend the visit enough. Using imagination to fill in the wonder that thousands travelled to in ancient times to experience can make this a moving experience. The sacred way still retains the marks of the huge oak doors that admitted the initiates to the sacred drama of the rites of Demeter and Persephone. It is quiet and mostly abandoned, not many visit here but if you like history and this site means something to you, you wont regret a somewhat difficult journey. (check with the driver that the number of your bus is indeed the right number and really does go to Eleusis. then its across the road, around the corner to your left and continue down - theres only one sign but people seem to know what a wandering tourist is after as there is little else there.
Written September 28, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

angeljoy2013
Albuquerque, NM8 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2013 • Friends
I was here in 2003 and in 2004, the push to get Athens ready for the 2004 Olympic games was underway, it was vey nice to get to a site I was inspired to visit for spiritual as well as cultural reasons, Elusis is an amazing place, which while is is in the middle of industry, it retains its old magic. The Plutonian is enchanting, before I returned to Athens, I went to eat at a small cafe over looking this mystical place...to alow the memories to linger...Must do for anyone who is in Greece for its spiritual legacy.
Written December 10, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Superkatt
Sweden6,711 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2013 • Couples
The Archeological Park of Eleusina, is placed now in the middle of modern settlement.There is the same ticket to the both Archeological site and Archeological Museum, which is situated on the site. Tickets are available at the entrance to the site, nearby there is a car park and the toilet facilities. Notable in the area is the remains of the very large temple called Telesterion, remains of the Small and Large Propylees, Plutonium Temple, and Temple of Arthemis and father Poseidon, as well as remains of many structures built on top of each other during the times. It is a good idea to bring with you a tourist guide with a map of site, because it is huge and a lot of detais can be easily missed without a map and description.
Museum collection is rather large and contains interesting finds and details from area and different times and epochs. Among the museum artefacts the small statuette of Poseidon, Athena, Cybele and others.
Written June 13, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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