Kerameikos Cemetery
Kerameikos Cemetery
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Duration: More than 3 hours
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The area
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Neighborhood: Psirri / Gazi
Side-by-side neighborhoods Psirri and Gazi provide some of the city’s prime nightlife. The almost claustrophobic streets of Psirri feature an interesting blend of original small businesses with the restaurants, cafés and bars that have recently sprouted up. The central artery of Agion Anargiron Street has lively places to eat or drink. Further west, you can visit the peaceful ancient cemetery of Keramikos, then cross busy Pireos Street to find yourself in Gazi. With the huge Technopolis performance and art complex converted from old gasworks at its heart, you really have to come at night to appreciate this maze of bars at its best, although a daytime stroll will allow you to admire the excellent street art.
How to get there
  • Thissio • 4 min walk
  • Monastiraki • 9 min walk
Reach out directly
See what travelers are saying
  • Katie G
    343 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Worth a visit, very peaceful.
    Visited as part of a skip the line main attraction ticket. Very peaceful and a lovely spot to take some nice pictures. Not a lot of information available but glad we visited. Wear sensible footwear though!
    Visited April 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written May 2, 2023
  • Athena Constantinou
    119 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Where history meets with emotion!
    Every city has its secret places, and one of these secrets is the Kerameikos Cemetery, probably the least known and least visited site of ancient Athens. This extraordinary 11-acre archaeological site was one of the largest cemeteries in ancient Greece and although underrated, houses one of the largest and most important collections of tombstones and funerary sculptures. It is located northwest of the Acropolis, a short walk from Monastiraki and the ancient Agora, at the end of Ermou Street. During your walk, you will enjoy the peaceful atmosphere surrounding the final resting place of the ancient Greek citizens and admire the tombstones and statues of amazing design and quality that date back 2400 years. Walking down the ancient path lined with tombs you can learn the stories of its inhabitants. A few metres from the main entrance stands proudly the tombstone of the two sisters Pamphili and Demetria, a masterpiece from the 4th century. On the upper level to your left are the graves of the eight children who died of the plague. If you continue down the visitor path, you can discover more stories from the tombstones. The impressive marble sculpture overlooking the ancient cemetery depicts a mounted warrior defeating an enemy; the imposing marble bull crowns the tomb of a prominent Athenian citizen who died young and much more if you have the time to look closely. On your way out, do not forget to visit the small museum, where there is an interesting exhibition of sculptures and pottery. Overall worth a visit, especially if you bought the Athens combo ticket!
    Visited May 2023
    Written May 22, 2023
  • Jydeoo
    Lagos, Nigeria2,311 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    A Fascinating Glimpse into Ancient Greek Traditions
    Keramikos is the ruins and reminants of an ancient Greek cemetery and "place for mourning". It offers a fascinating glimpse into ancient traditions and rituals associated with the deceased. As I wandered through the premises, I came across a temple tucked away in a secluded corner, enhancing the aura of mystery and spirituality. If you are without a tour guide, look for or ask for the different large layout boards that have the description of the different areas of the site, showcasing intricate planning and organization of the ancient Greeks. Among the numerous intriguing artifacts and remains, tombstones stood as testaments to the rich history and cultural practices of the time. It would seem that the best way to reach here is to walk down from Monastiraki Square or the Ancient Agora area. I went here through the Kermeikos metro station and that walk was the least pleasant of all the hiking I did in Athens. Fortunately, I followed the more pleasant and short route to the Ancient Agora, after leaving Keramikos. It has a museum, and a water vending machine. Plan to stay at least an hour, and enjoy your visit.
    Visited July 2023
    Traveled solo
    Written September 16, 2023
  • Bruce S
    Hat Head, Australia19 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    A jumble of archeological pieces in an ancient cemetery
    While visiting the National Archaeological Museum in Kerameikos we happened upon a sprawling, unkempt green space next to it which turned out to be a small ancient cemetery. It contained a scattering of sculptured headstones and monuments, as you’d expect not exactly in mint shape but historically interesting nonetheless. It was intriguing to first view these funereal art examples in the open free of charge and then skip across to the adjacent NAM and see the different curated sepulchral pieces there.
    Visited May 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written October 16, 2023
  • Katie G
    Indianapolis, Indiana7 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Peaceful and picturesque
    The cemetery is about 10 minute walk from Monastiraki square. The crowds really thinned out once we got past the flea market. It was peaceful and interesting to walk around the small museum and the grounds. It would also be a good place to get some photos if you are tired of waiting for all the Instagrammers posing at the more popular sites. There is a nice view of the Parthenon from that location as well, a different view than what you see walking around in Plaka. We spent about 90 minutes but you could spend longer.
    Visited October 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written October 18, 2023
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles710 reviews
Excellent
296
Very good
248
Average
127
Poor
26
Terrible
13

DuncanE145
Halesowen29 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2022
There were a lot of artifacts from the cemetery when we visited the National Archeological Museum, so we made the effort to visit the site itself. It's not too far from the Ancient Agora but feels like it's tucked away. You can see part of the old city walls and the ancient Greek engineering to re-direct the waterway - typically still working after nearly 2,500 years! There are some graves but a lot of the best relics are sited in museums elsewhere, nevertheless, well worth a visit, particularly as part of the €30 combined ticket.
Written November 15, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Athena Constantinou
119 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2023
Every city has its secret places, and one of these secrets is the Kerameikos Cemetery, probably the least known and least visited site of ancient Athens. This extraordinary 11-acre archaeological site was one of the largest cemeteries in ancient Greece and although underrated, houses one of the largest and most important collections of tombstones and funerary sculptures. It is located northwest of the Acropolis, a short walk from Monastiraki and the ancient Agora, at the end of Ermou Street. During your walk, you will enjoy the peaceful atmosphere surrounding the final resting place of the ancient Greek citizens and admire the tombstones and statues of amazing design and quality that date back 2400 years. Walking down the ancient path lined with tombs you can learn the stories of its inhabitants. A few metres from the main entrance stands proudly the tombstone of the two sisters Pamphili and Demetria, a masterpiece from the 4th century. On the upper level to your left are the graves of the eight children who died of the plague. If you continue down the visitor path, you can discover more stories from the tombstones. The impressive marble sculpture overlooking the ancient cemetery depicts a mounted warrior defeating an enemy; the imposing marble bull crowns the tomb of a prominent Athenian citizen who died young and much more if you have the time to look closely. On your way out, do not forget to visit the small museum, where there is an interesting exhibition of sculptures and pottery. Overall worth a visit, especially if you bought the Athens combo ticket!
Written May 22, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Steve_Grant1
Oldham, UK1,607 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2021
This is a cemetery site. Some interesting features but a lot of just "ruins". It is worth a visit but I would suggest buying the multi site ticket at the Acropolis and this site is one that is included. It and the other included sites give a greater overview of history rather than just the Acropolis only ticket. The multi site ticket is also much better value if you end up visiting all the ancient sites.
Written November 18, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Naija M
Algiers, Algeria667 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2022 • Solo
This site doesn’t seem to attract tourists in the same numbers as some of the other sites. You can wonder the grounds in relative peace and quiet. To be honest, at times I was wondering what I was looking at, as there are not that many signs and I don’t think there is an audio guide. The small museum has some beautiful exhibits. Keramikos is one of the seven sites included in the 30 Euro ticket.
Written December 28, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Bruce S
Hat Head, Australia19 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2023 • Couples
While visiting the National Archaeological Museum in Kerameikos we happened upon a sprawling, unkempt green space next to it which turned out to be a small ancient cemetery. It contained a scattering of sculptured headstones and monuments, as you’d expect not exactly in mint shape but historically interesting nonetheless. It was intriguing to first view these funereal art examples in the open free of charge and then skip across to the adjacent NAM and see the different curated sepulchral pieces there.
Written October 16, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

CraigH0901
Adelaide, Australia1,246 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2022
We took the Metro to Thessios station and walked from there. Not a long walk at all. The grounds of the Cemetary are quite large and there is a lot more than just headstones and burial sites. We bought an audio tour separately to the tickets and that helped quite a lot with understanding the background story and what was inside the park. I would suggest buying a ticket to the archaeological sites for EUR30 which covers this site and many more. Take time to have a good look around the walls, the old buildings, fountains, gates etc. Really interesting and important historical site.
Written September 6, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

italianforbeginners
Welwyn Garden City, UK94 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2023 • Friends
Don't bother with this, even though it's included in the combi ticket for the Acropolis and Agora. There's very little to see - all the actual statues etc are in the National Archaeological Museum (which is superb).
Three staff had time to argue over the validity of our combi ticket but apparently no one had time to fix the broken toilet!
Written July 17, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

paul and monica h
Crawley, UK181 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022 • Couples
Tucked away from all the other sites, this cemetery was worth a visit although its museum was closed for renovation at the time of our visit. Its got lots of information about the city walls and burial rites that went on during the time. It was one of our €30 deal for six sites.
Written October 29, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Linda B
Riga, Latvia84 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2020
We bought the ticket that includes all the historical sites, which is the main reason we went. There’s very little left form the ruins and not much to see. But if you have a tour guide by your side, the experience might be much more interesting!
Written July 4, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jydeoo
Lagos, Nigeria2,311 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2023 • Solo
Keramikos is the ruins and reminants of an ancient Greek cemetery and "place for mourning".

It offers a fascinating glimpse into ancient traditions and rituals associated with the deceased. As I wandered through the premises, I came across a temple tucked away in a secluded corner, enhancing the aura of mystery and spirituality.

If you are without a tour guide, look for or ask for the different large layout boards that have the description of the different areas of the site, showcasing intricate planning and organization of the ancient Greeks.

Among the numerous intriguing artifacts and remains, tombstones stood as testaments to the rich history and cultural practices of the time.

It would seem that the best way to reach here is to walk down from Monastiraki Square or the Ancient Agora area. I went here through the Kermeikos metro station and that walk was the least pleasant of all the hiking I did in Athens. Fortunately, I followed the more pleasant and short route to the Ancient Agora, after leaving Keramikos.

It has a museum, and a water vending machine.

Plan to stay at least an hour, and enjoy your visit.
Written September 16, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Kerameikos Cemetery, Athens

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