Ancient Agora of Athens
Ancient Agora of Athens
4.5
Historic Sites • Ancient Ruins • Points of Interest & Landmarks
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About
These ruins, located in the heart of modern Athens, were once the site of the marketplace in ancient times, a political, cultural and economic center of the ancient world.
Suggested duration
< 1 hour
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Admission tickets
from $8.37
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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Monastiraki
Monastiraki is a souvenir-hunting enclave with a difference. Apart from the dramatic backdrop of the Acropolis, its network of alleys and pedestrianized streets surround the remains of both the Greek and Roman agoras, adding the quaint concept that this is where the ancients also came to shop. Named after the tiny monastery church at its center, Monastiraki Square is a lively spot by day or night, with street peddlers vying for your attention to sell you nuts and sweets. Down beside the metro station, the official Flea Market is an unbroken row of souvenir shops until you come to antique-oriented Platia Avissinias, while Pandrossou Street on the other side of the square offers more tourist shopping. The pedestrianized street beside the Greek Agora is lined with cafés offering fine views.
How to get there
  • Thissio • 4 min walk
  • Monastiraki • 4 min walk
See what travelers are saying
  • Shush
    Kingswinford, United Kingdom163 contributions
    Well worth a visit
    This is a large planted area through which you can wander just a step away from the busy market square. We purchased 30 euro combined ticket which works out cheaper in summer but probably not so for winter as prices are reduced, also we found there is no need to actually go into two of the sites. Another thing to watch is that seniors have a cheaper entry fee as well. Steps up to the largest intact temple in Greece, which you cannot enter. Many statues and exhibits scattered around the garden with ancient pathways. Super view of the Pantheon on high. The small museum at one side is interesting, being filled with pottery and other finds. We would have paid to see this site.Take water if hot. Many restaurants run along the metro line so busy area with buskers etc.
    Visited February 2020
    Written February 17, 2020
  • aclayr
    Arizona303 contributions
    Easy Self-Guided Tour
    After dealing with the massive crowds at the Acropolis, our visit to the Ancient Agora was surprisingly pleasant. We arrived first thing in the morning, proceeded to skip the small line (we had combo tickets from the Acropolis), & found the grounds nearly empty. (There had been light rain on & off throughout the morning, so that might’ve contributed to the lack of tourists.) With the help of our Rick Steves guide book, we did a self-guided tour, which was the perfect amount of history/information for us. It was fairly quiet everywhere we explored & with the surrounding greenery, we almost forgot we were in the middle of a busy city. Overall, we had an educational but laidback experience, which was a welcoming change from the other attractions we had visited.
    Visited May 2019
    Written January 2, 2020
  • Eileen108
    Mount Shasta, California4,297 contributions
    A Field of Rubble Rich in History, with a Museum
    The area is breathtaking to imagine the history but is mostly a field of rubble, though there are many informative signs. The museum has many important and interesting artifacts, like the baby toilet from the 2nd century BC! The most intact structure is the Temple of Hephaistos, but entrance was blocked. The visit was made much more meaningful due to a free audio tour I downloaded from online, by tour guide Rick Steves, so I highly recommend it.
    Visited October 2019
    Written September 11, 2020
  • In-Yong H
    London, United Kingdom657 contributions
    A must-see sight in Athens
    As impressive as the Acropolis as is, I found exploring the huge site of the Ancient Agora equally as impressive. This contains the remains of the ancient Greek / Roman city centre, and even though most of the buildings are in ruins, you still get a good idea of the scale of the place. I spent more than 2 hours walking around, and could easily have spent more. The highlight is the Temple of Hephaestus, an amazingly well-preserved temple, and the well-curated museum exhibiting artefacts related to the life in the ancient city. You need a mask for the museum (Covid) and the place is included in the €30 combo ticket, which is think it a no-brainer if you're visiting Athens!
    Visited August 2020
    Traveled solo
    Written August 10, 2020
  • Steve Buckley
    London, United Kingdom6,276 contributions
    Natural follow-on to any Acropolis visit!
    My wife and myself are currently holidaying in Athens staying at the Grand Hyatt (Review to follow) and this morning we visited the Acropolis (see separate Review) and during this couldn’t fail to notice the Ancient Agora of Athens below. Fortunately, we had opted for the 30 Euros Combined entrance ticket which covered several other attractions including the Ancient Agora of Athens. As such, we went there from the Acropolis and - with an extremely well preserved temple of Hephaestus, impressive Stoa of Attalos Building and so much more to see - this proved an excellent move, one I would strongly recommend others to replicate.
    Visited October 2020
    Written October 1, 2020
  • Darsot77
    Southampton, United Kingdom275 contributions
    Great place. Must see.
    As with all attractions in Athens between 1st November and end of March is half price. It's €10 normally so our entrance fee was only €5. Athens' ancient marketplace, founded in the 6th century BC and was the heart of the city for 1,200 years. A large site containing amongst others : Stoa of Attalos which today houses a museum displaying finds from the Agora. Temple of Hephaestus which is the best-preserved Classical temple in Greece. Odeon of Agrippa Two Tritons and a Giant still remain. Great Drain still in use Today. Byzantine Church. and much else. Definitely a must-see when you're visiting Athens!
    Visited February 2020
    Written February 28, 2020
  • Ivan Kinsmam
    Kielce, Poland817 contributions
    One of the most interesting parts of ancient Athens
    The temple of Apollo Patroos (325 BC) is a beautiful little temple set on a hill - Apollo is the father of Ion, ancester of the Athenians, who was the special protector of groups of related families. Below are the ruins of varioud civic and administrative buildings including the Old Bouleutarian (early 5th c BC), a kind of Senate consisting of 500 members, that prepared the legislative bills for the Assembly of the People to vote on. Also the Metroon (150 BC) where decrees, law codes, financial regulations, legal documents etc. were stored.
    Visited February 2020
    Traveled with family
    Written February 4, 2020
  • CraigH0901
    Adelaide, Australia1,185 contributions
    Too Much to See
    This attraction is central to Athens attractions and is a must see item. It is over a large expanse and requires a lot of walking - take suitable shoes, clothing and water. A well preserved temple that is reasonably unique, a lot of well marked areas and a museum all worth your attention but beware - it will take time and effort. Purchase a ticket for a number of archaeological sites for EUR30 and this will be included in that price. Helps get past the lines at the very least.
    Visited September 2022
    Written September 6, 2022
  • permia
    40,479 contributions
    Superb reflection of its centrality in civic life of the city during ancient times
    We thoroughly enjoyed over two hours strolling throughout this superb area admiring the evocative remains of what was the centre of daily civic life in antiquity. It was fascinating to learn that it was in use for millennia before becoming the Civic Centre of the City, including as a cemetery during the latter Bronze Age. But undoubtedly it’s as the former that is best reflected in the great remnants and restorations. A gorgeous intricate Corinthian Capital is to be seen, as is a fine statue of Emperor Hadrian, who foremost of the Romans contributed most to Athens. Only the torso survives but it exquisitely shows a wolf suckling the twins Romulus and Remus of Roman legend and the Goddess Athena standing atop the wolf. A number of Stoa are displayed - South Stoa I, possibly used by metronomoi who were officials in charge of weights and measures; Middle Stoa that dates from around 180 BCE; and the undoubted jewel that is the Stoa of Attalos. Wonderfully restored in the 1950s it hosts the interesting Agora Museum with artefacts including fascinating Ostraca that were used to vote to banish or ostracise citizens. A lovely Byzantine Church of Agios Apostoloi with grand stone craft is well worth perusing. It is one of only two original edifices in the complex. The second is the gorgeous stunning Temple of Hephaestus, completed in 415 BCE and one of the highlights. A vista of Pentelic marble columns against the saturated early morning blue was delightful. Regarded as one of the best preserved Greek temples from antiquity it is a marvellous treasure. A Dais that bore ten bronze sculptures representing the Tribes of Athens is still evocative after more than two millennia. It is known as the Monument of the Eponymous Heroes Vestiges of Altars and Temples to numerous Deities are extant, including to Ares the Olympian Deity who was God of the Spirit of Battle. Further Altars are to Zeus and Zeus Agoraios, a most powerful God. Impressive and ornate with arrays of Corinthian columns, the grand Odeon of Agrippa was a gift to the Athenians from Emperor Augustus’s Son-in-Law. Impressive sculptures line the outlines and the fine performance space could accommodate an audience of around 1000. A water mill residue comprising two large circular mill stones is a further fascinating picture of ancient life, as is the Great Drain that provided essential drainage preventing flooding in the Agora.
    Visited March 2020
    Written February 18, 2021
  • Maria
    Torun, Poland19 contributions
    Packed with sights
    From all the things on the Combo ticket I think this one is the most worth seeing, apart from the Acropolis. The site itself is huge and offers a lot to see, it's pretty close to the Acropolis so chances are. you will already be in the area. If you want to properly experience it without rushing I recommend going after lunch, bringing plenty of water and allocating a few hours to this place. There's a museum in the main Stoa building which displays a lot of artifacts found in the area and explains some of the customs. There's plenty of statues, ruins, nature, etc to admire. There's a temple there which is very well preserved despite suffering from a fire. In general, I think you will find this one of the more interesting in visually stimulating sites to visit in Athens. If you've taken the metro you might have seen this site from underneath as the metro line runs directly through it. We truly enjoyed our time there, just wish we went there after lunch so we wouldn't be rushing so much.
    Visited September 2022
    Written September 15, 2022
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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In-Yong H
London, UK657 contributions
Aug 2020 • Solo
As impressive as the Acropolis as is, I found exploring the huge site of the Ancient Agora equally as impressive. This contains the remains of the ancient Greek / Roman city centre, and even though most of the buildings are in ruins, you still get a good idea of the scale of the place. I spent more than 2 hours walking around, and could easily have spent more. The highlight is the Temple of Hephaestus, an amazingly well-preserved temple, and the well-curated museum exhibiting artefacts related to the life in the ancient city. You need a mask for the museum (Covid) and the place is included in the €30 combo ticket, which is think it a no-brainer if you're visiting Athens!
Written August 10, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Steve Buckley
London, UK6,276 contributions
Oct 2020
My wife and myself are currently holidaying in Athens staying at the Grand Hyatt (Review to follow) and this morning we visited the Acropolis (see separate Review) and during this couldn’t fail to notice the Ancient Agora of Athens below.

Fortunately, we had opted for the 30 Euros Combined entrance ticket which covered several other attractions including the Ancient Agora of Athens. As such, we went there from the Acropolis and - with an extremely well preserved temple of Hephaestus, impressive Stoa of Attalos Building and so much more to see - this proved an excellent move, one I would strongly recommend others to replicate.
Written October 1, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Darsot77
Southampton, UK275 contributions
Feb 2020
As with all attractions in Athens between 1st November and end of March is half price. It's €10 normally so our entrance fee was only €5.
Athens' ancient marketplace, founded in the 6th century BC and was the heart of the city for 1,200 years.
A large site containing amongst others :
Stoa of Attalos which today houses a museum displaying finds from the Agora.
Temple of Hephaestus which is the best-preserved Classical temple in Greece.
Odeon of Agrippa Two Tritons and a Giant still remain.
Great Drain still in use Today.
Byzantine Church.
and much else.
Definitely a must-see when you're visiting Athens!
Written February 28, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ivan Kinsmam
Kielce, Poland817 contributions
Feb 2020 • Family
The temple of Apollo Patroos (325 BC) is a beautiful little temple set on a hill - Apollo is the father of Ion, ancester of the Athenians, who was the special protector of groups of related families.

Below are the ruins of varioud civic and administrative buildings including the Old Bouleutarian (early 5th c BC), a kind of Senate consisting of 500 members, that prepared the legislative bills for the Assembly of the People to vote on. Also the Metroon (150 BC) where decrees, law codes, financial regulations, legal documents etc. were stored.
Written February 4, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

CraigH0901
Adelaide, Australia1,185 contributions
Sep 2022
This attraction is central to Athens attractions and is a must see item. It is over a large expanse and requires a lot of walking - take suitable shoes, clothing and water. A well preserved temple that is reasonably unique, a lot of well marked areas and a museum all worth your attention but beware - it will take time and effort. Purchase a ticket for a number of archaeological sites for EUR30 and this will be included in that price. Helps get past the lines at the very least.
Written September 6, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

permia
Ireland40,479 contributions
Mar 2020
We thoroughly enjoyed over two hours strolling throughout this superb area admiring the evocative remains of what was the centre of daily civic life in antiquity.

It was fascinating to learn that it was in use for millennia before becoming the Civic Centre of the City, including as a cemetery during the latter Bronze Age. But undoubtedly it’s as the former that is best reflected in the great remnants and restorations.

A gorgeous intricate Corinthian Capital is to be seen, as is a fine statue of Emperor Hadrian, who foremost of the Romans contributed most to Athens. Only the torso survives but it exquisitely shows a wolf suckling the twins Romulus and Remus of Roman legend and the Goddess Athena standing atop the wolf.

A number of Stoa are displayed - South Stoa I, possibly used by metronomoi who were officials in charge of weights and measures; Middle Stoa that dates from around 180 BCE; and the undoubted jewel that is the Stoa of Attalos.

Wonderfully restored in the 1950s it hosts the interesting Agora Museum with artefacts including fascinating Ostraca that were used to vote to banish or ostracise citizens.

A lovely Byzantine Church of Agios Apostoloi with grand stone craft is well worth perusing. It is one of only two original edifices in the complex.

The second is the gorgeous stunning Temple of Hephaestus, completed in 415 BCE and one of the highlights. A vista of Pentelic marble columns against the saturated early morning blue was delightful. Regarded as one of the best preserved Greek temples from antiquity it is a marvellous treasure.

A Dais that bore ten bronze sculptures representing the Tribes of Athens is still evocative after more than two millennia. It is known as the Monument of the Eponymous Heroes

Vestiges of Altars and Temples to numerous Deities are extant, including to Ares the Olympian Deity who was God of the Spirit of Battle. Further Altars are to Zeus and Zeus Agoraios, a most powerful God.

Impressive and ornate with arrays of Corinthian columns, the grand Odeon of Agrippa was a gift to the Athenians from Emperor Augustus’s Son-in-Law. Impressive sculptures line the outlines and the fine performance space could accommodate an audience of around 1000.

A water mill residue comprising two large circular mill stones is a further fascinating picture of ancient life, as is the Great Drain that provided essential drainage preventing flooding in the Agora.
Written February 18, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Maria
Torun, Poland19 contributions
Sep 2022
From all the things on the Combo ticket I think this one is the most worth seeing, apart from the Acropolis. The site itself is huge and offers a lot to see, it's pretty close to the Acropolis so chances are. you will already be in the area. If you want to properly experience it without rushing I recommend going after lunch, bringing plenty of water and allocating a few hours to this place.

There's a museum in the main Stoa building which displays a lot of artifacts found in the area and explains some of the customs. There's plenty of statues, ruins, nature, etc to admire. There's a temple there which is very well preserved despite suffering from a fire. In general, I think you will find this one of the more interesting in visually stimulating sites to visit in Athens. If you've taken the metro you might have seen this site from underneath as the metro line runs directly through it.

We truly enjoyed our time there, just wish we went there after lunch so we wouldn't be rushing so much.
Written September 16, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

andyh67186334
Coalville, UK6,814 contributions
Jan 2022
The admission to the Ancient Agora of Athens was part of the 7 site ticket over five days at a cost of 30 Euros.
It's a very interesting site with great views of the Acropolis, and an ancient temple. There is also a church on site, which was closed and a museum displaying artefacts across the centuries. There are plenty of restaurants outside the main entrance should you want a drink or food.
Written February 5, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Vikki G
Peterborough, Canada188 contributions
Feb 2022
We saw from a roof top bar a lot of people on the hill for sunset, we joined this group a few nights later. It is beautiful! You have a great view over Athens, you are close to the Acropolis and can see the Sea.

It does not cost anything but be careful the rocks are very slippery. It is a nice self guided tour through out the ground.
Written February 28, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Luisa Bettina V
Jeddah, Saudi Arabia73 contributions
Jul 2021
I enjoyed walking the Ancient Agora. It was very sunny and hot, but the place has quiet spots to sit down and admire the place. If you are an art lover like me, you will find yourself in the luckiest place to take pictures and admire the Greek monuments without the crowds of the Acropolis.
I would make three suggestions: First, bring VERY comfortable shoes, you will need them! Second, invest in water bottles if it is Summer. One might not be enough! Third, take your time to see the Museum of the Ancient Agora and the small church inside the Agora. Both places are small but full of interesting details if you are looking for art and quality stuff!
Written July 11, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Ancient Agora of Athens

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Ancient Agora of Athens admission prices can vary. Entrance tickets currently cost $8.19, while a popular guided tour starts around $6.00 per person. See all 214 Ancient Agora of Athens tickets and tours on Tripadvisor

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