Museu Do Aljube

Museu Do Aljube, Lisbon: Address, Phone Number, Museu Do Aljube Reviews: 4.5/5

Museu Do Aljube
4.5
Speciality Museums • History Museums
About
Suggested duration
1-2 hours
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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Baixa, Rossio & Restauradores
A pending candidate to become a World Heritage Site, Lisbon's downtown (the "Baixa Pombalina", or simply "Baixa") is a perfect example of anti-earthquake construction, having been rebuilt following the 1755 earthquake by the famous Marquês de Pombal (hence its name). Its offer is vast: restaurants and cafes in Rossio and Restauradores, outlets and shops in the Áurea, Augusta, Prata and other famous streets, the imponent Praça do Comércio and its Arch, the luxury shops along the Avenida da Liberdade, this is the beating heart of the city center. The Baixa also grants easy access to trains leading to Sintra, the trams that go around the Castle hill, old neighborhoods or even take you to Belém, and Lisbon's traditional restaurants and cafes. Considering a visit to the Fashion and Design Museum (free entrance) and don't forget to try the famous liquor, "ginjinha"!
How to get there
  • Terreiro do Paço • 5 min walk
  • Baixa/Chiado • 8 min walk
Popular mentions

4.5
257 reviews
Excellent
174
Very good
69
Average
12
Poor
1
Terrible
1

RafikiLondon
Hong Kong, China503 contributions
Nov 2021
I had just visited the the Castelo de São Jorge for the afternoon and spotted the sign for this museum. The small simple entrance opened up to three floors of fascinating Lisbon, Portuguese and colonial history. But this is not the story of glorious men, fatherland and empire that you will see almost everywhere else in Portugal. Instead these are the difficult and sensitive stories of women and men who were suppressed and silenced both in Portugal and overseas: The Three Marias, the African nationalists and the Anti-fascists. This museum is quite unlike any other and draws back in time when the building itself was a women's prison. For a very different look at the history that many former imperial powers avoid take a walk around here.
Written November 28, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Wouter V
5 contributions
Oct 2021
Worst museum I've ever been to. The texts at the exhibits are poorly translated to English, they all have difficult to follow sentences, are full of unexplained acronyms, and are mostly just a dry summary of years and names. The focus is not on the narrative or the story, it seems like this is a museum for robots. See the pictures attached for examples.
Written October 2, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Bronwyn
113 contributions
Sep 2021
Really amazing museum; small but powerful. Went here with a large group which was a bit dicey, but learned a lot about the Salazar era and resistance by the Communist Party of Portugal. Great way to begin my trip and very eye opening.
Written September 9, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

starlightShanghai
Victoria, Canada3,247 contributions
Jun 2021
Going through this museum is a real education. Doing so revealed to me the level of my own ignorance.

When I first saw the name of the museum I assumed it was related to WW2. I hadn’t the slightest idea of the misery that the Portuguese people endured for so many years under such a brutal dictatorship.

The museum is nicely set out, with brief videoed testimonies from survivors of that period. There are also a few old film clips of dictator Salazar promoting his rather bizarre ‘We do not discuss’ agenda. (The white subtitles are a bit of a challenge to read. Easier with black subtitles.)

A couple of prison cells remain, which look pretty dire! There are also a couple of mini-dioramas related to resistance groups. Resistance groups were indeed formed, but their clandestine meetings were always fraught with great danger.

There’s a good section on Portugal’s colonialism. And then, the Carnation Revolution - Freedom Day - 25 April 1974.

There is a huge amount of text to read, so make sure to bring along your reading glasses!

Very easy to find this place. It’s about a minute’s walk up R. Augusto Rosa from the Sé.
Written July 15, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Magdalena K
Hilversum, The Netherlands48 contributions
Sep 2020 • Solo
Very educational and interesting place. A lesson of Portugees history. Great pictures and short documentaries.
Written September 20, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

June A
Surrey, UK2,301 contributions
Nov 2019 • Solo
It's a shame so little of the information in this fascinating museum is in English, as this is such an important aspect of Porruguese history. What is available is nevertheless both fascinating and devastating at the same time.
Written September 5, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Adrian S
Northampton, UK137 contributions
Mar 2020
Lots of detailed presentations housed in building that has been used as a prison for centuries.
There was a lot of detail to read so it takes a couple of hours to do it justice but thankfully most of the exhibits were in both Portuguese and English.
Written March 1, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

ozzie5melbourne
Melbourne473 contributions
Feb 2020
This is an inexpensive and interesting museum with well set out displays and it provided a structure for understanding more about the struggles of the Portuguese over so many many years of dictatorship. There are good explanations in English. If only we understood Portuguese we would have learnt even more. This history is in living memory and the stories from those who experienced the hardships (and torture) bring history to life. Lest we forget.
Written February 24, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Simon
Montreal, Canada58 contributions
Jan 2020
This is a very important museum to visit. It reminds guests of the struggles the people of Portugal have had with dictators, censorship and oppressive times.

It is sad and touching, but also uplifting because there is a happy ending. The displays and info are well designed and quite engaging. Four floors with a lot of history and insight into human rights and human perseverance. An important stop in your exploration of Lisbon and Portugal. A good place to visit on your way down from the Castello S, Jorge.
Written January 28, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

avrilritchie
Dundee, UK300 contributions
Apr 2019
Best equal museum we visited in Lisbon. Atmospheric enlightening and so informative. We spent a long time here so engaged were we with the material on display. Thoroughly recommend a visit here - some uncomfortable viewing and reading but very necessary for deepening understanding not just of Portugal but the world - very relevant to contemporary themes!
Lovely cafe.
Entrance very cheap - they should really charge more.
Written January 21, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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