Het Jonge Schaap
Het Jonge Schaap
4.5
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles179 reviews
Excellent
110
Very good
58
Average
8
Poor
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TUFC
Dunblane, Scotland163 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2024 • Couples
This was the windmill we chose to visit given they cost 6e each . It is new but to the original blueprint. It was dismantled to be re-erected here but during the Second World War the original timber was all used for other things. It was very interesting to see the log being prepared for sawing and it being sawn . You tend to think windmills grind things or pump water so to see logs being made was different .
Written June 15, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Simonh
5 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
ok, so i am a wood bore. and it is my job, but i was not expecting this. we had booked a tour of windmills, clogs, biscuits etc.. and we had no idea that this was on the tour.
a fascinating day to see how this revolution in utilising wind power to run a sawmill, and its impact not only only dutch history but that of northern europe.

the sheer beauty of the mill working is a delight.

enjoy.
Written November 6, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Manoul
Beirut, Lebanon768 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Solo

The original mill was built in 1680 and demolished in 1942. Between 2005 and 2007, a replica of the mill at the Zaanse Schans, between the mills “De Zoeker” and “De Bonte Hen”. The construction of the replica was based on detailed drawings Anton Sipman had made before the original mill was demolished.
Written June 25, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Taniusha
6 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019 • Friends
Very nice experience!enjoyed it so much it was a lot of wind that day
The photo tells everything!Look at the wooden shoes of the owner :he told me he allready got used with them even.
Written December 26, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Malin A
Alingsas, Sweden133 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019 • Friends
This was a stop on our bustour and it was very interesting to see how they used the wind to cut trees to material, unfortunately our guide was in such a rush all the time that we couldnt buy anything in the giftshop, i fell in love with the branded cutting board!
Written September 14, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ThatCouple
Sanford, NC136 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019
We visited on one of the hottest days of the year. When we got here, the wind was not blowing at all. One volunteer went up and manually got the windmill going, he was VERY strong. The amazing thing was around 1920 there were only 20 windmills left of the 1000 that made the Zaan district the oldest industrial area of the world. It is truly amazing how Cornelius Cornelisz figured out how to use wind power to saw wood. Once you step inside, you just have to wonder how his mind figured it out. All the volunteers were so nice and willing to answer any of your questions. We grabbed an ice cream and cocoa from the chocolate windmill on our way out.
Written August 15, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Fred de Soet
Soest, The Netherlands773 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Solo
The "Het Jonge Schaap" timber sewing windmill has been constructed from scratch merely based on old drawings.
After entering the mill watch the short video of the making of this mill in 2005-2007. It's informative and impressive also.
Staff is friendly, knows a lot and is prepared to answer your questions.

When you're not in a big group you feel, smell and hear the factory working, saw blades slowly moving through the wood...

Entrance fee is 4,50 Euro which includes a short but very informative brochure. Take your time on this one!
Written May 29, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Hurleys256
London, UK625 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Friends
Het Jonge Schaap Sawmill (The Young Sheep). This is a classic Dutch Sawmill but recently built in two years (2005 to 2007). It was built using the latest computer aided design but using the plans and details all faithfully documented when another local saw mill was dismantled in 1942. This mill is a cap winder in which just the cap of the mill can be rotated so that the vanes can always be faced into the wind but unlike some UK wind mills that use a little ‘jockey’ vane to turn the cap into the wind, this type of mill uses a huge capstan like the wheel on an old sailing ship to move the vanes into the wind. The circular motion of the vanes is transferred into the mill using a system of shafts and the final up and down motion of the saw blades is achieved using a metal ‘crank’. Simultaneously with the up and down motion of the blades is a ratchet wheel that moves the trunk forward with each saw cut. Wind power is also used to haul the logs up from the ground or from the water into the sawing loft using a windlass system.
Visitors can ascend the various steps to the sawing loft, so it is not suitable for the infirm. The mill crew here are very friendly and happy to answer any questions and are keen to describe the workings of the mill.
It is a fascinating piece of working history and is actively used to create planks that are used in historic construction work.
There is a fee to enter this mill however if you have paid the site entrance fee, this entitles you to two free mill visits.
Written February 26, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Beijinggul X
Cincinnati, OH207 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2019 • Friends
Was totaaly impressed with this visit. Got to see sawmill at work. Despite the rain, we still enjoyed the scenery including the quaint village that surrounds the mills.
Written February 2, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

PookyCake
Victoria, Canada14,357 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2018
Molen Het Jonge Schaap is one of six historic windmills in Zaanse Schans. Much like De Gekroonde Poelenburg, this windmill is used as a sawmill; as such, it cuts logs and prepares them for shipment elsewhere. As other thoughtful reviewers have noted, the interiors of Het Jonge Schaap are extremely detailed and complex – it really gets you thinking about how the engineers used their cunning and ingenuity to harness the power of wind for such an elaborate task.

Unlike the other windmills of Zaanse Schans, which have roots back to the Dutch Golden Age, Het Jonge Schaap is, in fact, a replica. The original wooden wind-powered sawmill was built in 1680 and remained in operation until 1942 when it was demolished. Some 65 years later, Het Jonge Schaap was built using detailed original drawings to demonstrate the versatility of windmills in the Netherlands. The end result is a thing of beauty, combining reliable technical skill with the natural world. Thus, while this windmill may not necessarily be as “historic” as the others, it nevertheless adds an air of authenticity to the Zaanse Schans experience.

Additionally, once you know of this windmill’s history, the name Het Jonge Schaap, or “the young sheep,” makes a lot more sense ;)
Written October 12, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Het Jonge Schaap - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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