Arco Etrusco
Arco Etrusco
4.5

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4.5
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Vadim
Murmansk, Russia33,608 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2023 • Solo
Ancient Perusia is probably not older than Rome, but also not much younger, because it was first mentioned in connection with Rome's war with the Etruscan cities, one of which was Perusia. It was in 310-309 BC. The construction of this gate dates back to the same time. One of the seven gates of the almost impregnable Perusia. Rome eventually subdued Perusia, and in the war with Hannibal she was on his side, although many cities like Capua sided with the Punic commander. The arch has the inscription Augusta Perusia. This was the name of the city after the siege by Octavian Augustus during the civil war with Mark Anthony, whose family ruled the city at that time. The city could not be stormed, and it surrendered only after a months-long siege. The appearance of the arch is not quite the same as it was in ancient times. A loggia was built on the left tower during the Renaissance. In antiquity, such arches were not built...
Written May 6, 2024
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backpacker31
Boynton Beach, FL5,774 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020 • Solo
Massive archway leading into the heart of old Perugia. Built by the Etruscans in the 3rd century B.C. this has stood the test of time. It is one of several archways that still remain in the city. It is located adjacent to the lovely Palazzo Gallenga which is part of the university.
Written February 26, 2020
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liucy752
Taipei, Taiwan1,504 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2019 • Family
More majestic than expected. Built in the 3rd century BC by the Etruscans, before the Roman period. The Etruscans fell to the Romans in 40 BC.

The Gate was restored by Augustus (the first Emperor of the Roman Empire) after his victory in the Perusine War. So it is Also known as the “Arch of Augustus”.

The Arch, is a building element introduced by the Etruscans and became one of their major contributions to Roman architecture.

A renaissance loggia is perched on the left top in the 16th century. It adds more beauty and romance to the building.

In front of the Gate, located the Palazzo Gallenga-Stuart, which houses the University for Foreigners.
Written March 23, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mairwen1
United Kingdom10,661 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2023 • Couples
In an age of built-in obsolescence, it was incredible to see this arch still here today, still standing after more than 2000 years.
Built by the Etruscans in the 3rd century BC, it was restored by the Emperor Augustus in 40 BC. Apart from this one renovation job, it is otherwise intact and looks pretty much like it did when the Etruscans first chiselled away at massive blocks of stone and hauled them into place to build the gateway. That realisation alone gave me reason to stand in front of it and spend several minutes marvelling at it.
It’s obvious straight away that this would have been a formidable barrier to anyone who was even thinking about attacking Perugia.
Over 9 metres tall, it has a single archway, with a large tower on the left (although the tower wasn’t added until the 16th century and the loggia was added some time after that).
A small bricked-in arch directly above the main arch caught our eye and we wondered what it was for. Later we learnt that defensive weapons were probably positioned here.
The Latin words ‘AUGUSTA PERUSIA’ can be clearly seen, stamped across the front of the arch. They loosely translate as ‘Perugia, owned and protected by Augustus’ and refer to Augustus’ conquest of Perugia in 40 BC.
Those with keener eyes than mine can apparently still see traces of a red pigment that was used as a filler to make the inscription stand out.
DIY WALKING TOUR - To get to the arch, we walked from Piazza IV Novembre, down Via Ulisse Rocchi (about 5 min). Coming from this direction, the arch doesn’t look particularly impressive so make sure to walk through the arch and look at it from the other side. Next, we followed the ancient walls around to the right (take the street alongside of the Church of San Fortunato) and climbed the stairs to the Fortress of Porta a Sole lookout point. From here, it’s easy to circle back around to the main square and the Cathedral where you can check out the Cathedral, the Palazzo dei Priori, the Fontana Maggiore and the ancient Etruscan well.
Written July 10, 2023
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Philip P
Herentals, Belgium1,422 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2020
So old, and splendid that the inner (Etruscan) and outer (Roman) city walls are both well protected. Clear differences between both, nice to observe.
Written October 10, 2020
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JohJ
104 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Couples
This arch is built over 2000 years by the Etrusks. Absolutely impressive that hands designed and built this Arco Etrusco. And that it has survived all wars and other threads. More of the Etruskian history can be found in the archeological museum of Perugia.
Written June 28, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ValerieJo18
Chicago, IL220 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018
An easy walk down Ulisse Rocchi street behind dome (nice little bakery along the way). This arch was built around the 3rd century B.C., and was one of the 7 entrance gates to Perugia in the Etruscan period. About two centuries after its construction, the inscription "Augusta Perusia" was carved onto it to celebrate the conquer of the city by the Emperor Augustus. Amazing to see this. Worth the walk.
Written July 23, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

kpiddy
Brisbane, Australia14,003 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2016 • Couples
What an incredible sight it was to see the Etruscan Arch (Arco Etrusco), built in the later half of the third century BC. There are seven gates in the old city wall, but the Etruscan Arch is said to be the largest. Adjacent to the arch on either side are two trapezoidal towers, viewing this section of the wall from below on Piazza Grimana was an almighty sight, a testament to the intelligence and ingenuity of the Etruscans. A sign of strength.
Written June 1, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Hristo Beshovski
4 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2021
The most impressive city gate in Perugia and there are a lot of them there. I think is the oldest one from the times of Imperial Rome. The walls there are massive.
Written December 13, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

G.B.
822 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2021
It doesn't happen often to find traces of the Etruscan civilization within everyone's reach. Look for the Latin inscriptions still intact present: "Augusta Perusia", placed on an arch after some civil wars and "Colonia Vibia", written in honor of a Roman emperor native of the city!
Written October 6, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Arco Etrusco, Perugia

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