San Pietro alla Magione Church

San Pietro alla Magione Church, Siena

San Pietro alla Magione Church

San Pietro alla Magione Church
4
Religious Sites • Churches & Cathedrals
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Brun066
By Brun066
Perhaps the most evocative image in the city, regarding "Siena daughter of the road".
Jun 2019
"Magione" is an old-fashioned word of Italian language, no longer in use today, coming from the Latin "mansio"; while the French correspondent "maison" is still used in common language to say "home". In Latin, and in ancient Italian, "mansio" and "magione" are something more than a house: they are a residence as the object of a quite complex administration, featuring functions of economic management: household, agriculture, hospitality, etc. . "San Pietro alla Magione" therefore designates a church to which a residence is attached. And the residence is used as a resting place for travelers, first of alla the primary travelers of the Middle Ages (Christian but not only): the pilgrims. In fact we are along Via di Camollia, the street which is one of the urban stretches of the Via Francigena: ie, the path leading to /from Rome and which today has been restored for contemporary hikers. It is indeed true - and it must be emphasized - that the pilgrimage routes of the Middle Ages didn't resemble the elaborate, heavily built Roman roads, but were rather an unstable bundle of routes featuring a natural background, and allowing almost infinite alternative branches and deviations. But it's also true that Siena, called "daughter of the road" by the historian Ernesto Sestan, was one of the hubs where the bundles of itineraries reunited to converge on this agglomeration of places of rest and assistance; then it became a flourishing city, one of the greatest cities of Europe in the 13th and 14th centuries. In fact, visiting this church gives, in my opinion, an evocative idea of ​​the ancient (and here even rather lonely) Via Francigena - on which precisely it stands - and of its function - a sacred place and a shelter attached - precisely of "mansion". Don't be mislead: although modest, no-frills - indeed precisely because this - such building clearly tells to us about the Siena of origins. I think it's a "not to be missed".

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Brun066
Florence, Italy10,527 contributions
Perhaps the most evocative image in the city, regarding "Siena daughter of the road".
Jun 2019 • Business
"Magione" is an old-fashioned word of Italian language, no longer in use today, coming from the Latin "mansio"; while the French correspondent "maison" is still used in common language to say "home".
In Latin, and in ancient Italian, "mansio" and "magione" are something more than a house: they are a residence as the object of a quite complex administration, featuring functions of economic management: household, agriculture, hospitality, etc. .
"San Pietro alla Magione" therefore designates a church to which a residence is attached. And the residence is used as a resting place for travelers, first of alla the primary travelers of the Middle Ages (Christian but not only): the pilgrims.
In fact we are along Via di Camollia, the street which is one of the urban stretches of the Via Francigena: ie, the path leading to /from Rome and which today has been restored for contemporary hikers.
It is indeed true - and it must be emphasized - that the pilgrimage routes of the Middle Ages didn't resemble the elaborate, heavily built Roman roads, but were rather an unstable bundle of routes featuring a natural background, and allowing almost infinite alternative branches and deviations. But it's also true that Siena, called "daughter of the road" by the historian Ernesto Sestan, was one of the hubs where the bundles of itineraries reunited to converge on this agglomeration of places of rest and assistance; then it became a flourishing city, one of the greatest cities of Europe in the 13th and 14th centuries.
In fact, visiting this church gives, in my opinion, an evocative idea of ​​the ancient (and here even rather lonely) Via Francigena - on which precisely it stands - and of its function - a sacred place and a shelter attached - precisely of "mansion".
Don't be mislead: although modest, no-frills - indeed precisely because this - such building clearly tells to us about the Siena of origins. I think it's a "not to be missed".
Written June 26, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Thomas Ozbun
Vicenza, Italy982 contributions
Nice little church
Feb 2018 • Friends
A nice little church, San Pietro alla Magione was built in the 12th century in a Romanesque style. It is worth a peek if you are walking along Via Camollia.
Written January 17, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

westy54
Sydney, Australia6,776 contributions
Single nave church with a stone exterior facade and largely unadorned interior.
Sep 2018 • Couples
This church is located along the via Camollia and at one time was used by the Contrada Istrice. The Istrice Baptisimal Fountain is still located on the side of this church in the via Malta.

Documents state that there has been a church on this site since 998. This current church is made of stone and outside it has a lateral staircase descending down either side from the doorway. Inside there is a single narrow nave with a timber ceiling. There are statues opposite each other in small alcoves half way down the church as well as a simple altar of marble with a cross behind it.

On the right hand side as you enter the church there is a chapel which was erected in the early 16th century in gratitude to the passing of the plague.
Written November 29, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Juhi K
Sydney, Australia415 contributions
Cool medieval church
May 2016 • Couples
This chirch looks quite medieval from outside.

We passed by this church on our way back to the train station. It is a cool church and we noticed that passers by tend to take a pittstop here.
Written May 7, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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