Cappelle Medicee
Cappelle Medicee
4.5
Points of Interest & LandmarksArchitectural BuildingsChurches & Cathedrals
About
Opulently decorated in marble, gold and jewels, these chapels are a celebration of one of Italy's most famous and powerful families - the Medicis.
Duration: < 1 hour
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Admission tickets
from $20.25
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Plan your visit
The area
Address
Neighborhood: Florence Historic Center
How to get there
  • Alamanni-Stazione Santa Maria Novella • 8 min walk
Reach out directly
See what travelers are saying
  • Neslihan
    Istanbul, Türkiye12 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Chapelle Medicee
    The ceilings are amazing. Michelangelo did the best as always! You can visit the place about 1 hour, there are 2 chapels. Lorenzo the Magnificent's grave is also there. And Michelangelo himself made a sculpture for his grave. There are also Grand Duke's graves and many other, grand duke's crowns there too.
    Visited July 2023
    Traveled solo
    Written July 7, 2023
  • George S
    Miami Beach, Florida1,616 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Not to be missed!!
    Two impressive mausoleums/chapels built for the Medici families are not to be missed. The Chapel of the Princes is a magnificent work of art — probably the most beautiful interior that I have seen in Florence. Built of colorful marble and semi-precious stones it is simply “over the top” and awesome. The second, New Sacristy, constructed by Michelangelo (but finished by Vasari) is done in white marble, smaller and less grand, but nevertheless beautiful. It is the resting place of Lorenzo the Magnificent. 9 Euro entrance fee for the pair — well worth it!!
    Visited May 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written July 12, 2023
  • Akshaya S
    Noida, India520 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    A hidden gem
    Medici Chapel is the most beautiful building we have seen in Florence. Just as you walk in the main chapel (of their princes), you would feel the beauty and enormity of the place. It is simple a work of art. Such high ceiling and beautiful work on the dome. It was such a delight to see this and the crowd was very less. The domes are magnificent too mostly due to the statues places on them by Michelangelo and some which were finished later by someone else.
    Visited June 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written July 15, 2023
  • Lucas H
    Atibaia, SP28 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    BEST in Florence!
    if you go to florence you have to go to cappele medici! it should be the #1 in florence. the dome is probably the prettiest thing i have ever seen, i was speechless. i’m not that affectionate with art but i spent a long time just looking to the ceiling and admiring it.
    Visited August 2023
    Traveled solo
    Written August 24, 2023
  • maza79
    San Antonio, Texas53 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Breathtaking!
    This was at the top of the things we saw in Florence in 5 days. Walked right up to this very unassuming building and paid $10 euros a piece. When we walked into the upstairs area, I couldn't believe the beauty and enormity of it all, and hardly any other people! We spend alot of time there and able to get great pictures! Also enjoyed all the other sculptures in the various rooms. Truly a hidden gem!
    Visited September 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written September 21, 2023
  • Tualie
    Varese, Italy1,520 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Medici family museum
    This mausoleum (or chapels) are located at the back side of the Basilica of St. Lawrence (Lorenzo), we skip the basilica (because is a separate ticket despite being attached buildings, so will do it next time) to visit this. Is very interesting if really into Medici family story and Michelangelo artwork. As the name suggests, all members of the Medici family are buried there, reason why this was built as a family mausoleum behind their parish church. Well, not all members were buried there like Catherine de’ Medici who became Queen regent of France (buried in St. Denis basilica in Paris) and Pope Leo X (buried in Rome but is exhibited his mitre and stole) but Lorenzo (Lawrence) the Magnificent is present in the mausoleum as well as Cosimo, the founder of the Medici power dynasty. The New Sacristy is well worth to visit as houses many sculptures by Michelangelo. There is also a secret room with anatomical sketches drew by Michelangelo (discovered in the 1970’s) but not visitable because of preservation reasons. Overall, a nice visit.
    Visited February 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written October 7, 2023
  • Alpaslan
    6 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Go To The Smaller Room!
    This chapel is a living, breathing reminder of why you must read a few paragraphs about a site you are about to visit before actually visiting the site. When my wife and I came here for a visit over a decade ago, we did not realize that the Michelangelo statues were in another much smaller room, and we just left after seeing the main chapel. Thankfully, we are seasoned tourists now, and we went straight to the Michelangelo statues this time. These statues are some of the best I have ever seen from Michelangelo. I would go so far as to say that they are far better than any other Michelangelo statue in Florence with the obvious exception of the David in the Accademia Gallery. This is a must visit site if you are in Florence for more than a day trip, and if you do it efficiently by buying your ticket online, I promise it will only take 30 minutes. We were in Florence for only one day. We took the fast train in Rome, and since the Medici Chapel was right on the road from the train station to the Duomo, we spared 30 minutes to see it. I would understand if other day trippers who are paranoid about time skipped it. But if you are in Florence for a day and a half or two days, after the Duomo, the Accademia, and the Uffizi, this is the next major site to see in my opinion.
    Visited April 2024
    Traveled with family
    Written April 7, 2024
  • westy54
    Sydney, Australia11,515 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Burial place of the Medicis. Only enormous wealth could have funded such a stunning and opulent mausoleum.
    The Medici chapels are now separated from the the Church of San Lorenzo and have their own separate entrance off the Piazza di Madonna Degli Aldobrandin. Cost of entry was EUR9-00 per adult. There are three separate areas being the crypt, where some of the Grand Dukes of Tuscany and their wives and some other lesser known members of the Medicis are buried. The next area, after you walk up several spiral stairs, is the absolutely stunning marble edifice that is the Chapel of the Princes. This magnificent octagonal hall is over 30 metres high whilst its cupola (designed by Buontalentu) is approximately 60 metres high. The walls and floor are clad in a myriad of different coloured marble, granite, jasper and semi-precious stones. Side chapels hold the sarcophagi of the first six Grand Dukes of Tuscany including Cosimi I, II and III, Ferdinando I and II and Francesco I. Only two of the large bronze statues planned to sit in the niches above the sarcophagi were completed. Those being for Cosimo II and Ferdinando I. The Chapel of the Princes was built between 1604 and 1640 however the inlay of the semi-precious stones took longer to complete as did the frescoed cupola which was only completed in the early 19th century. Behind the stunning, ornate altar are two small rooms that hold the Treasure of San Lorenzo which includes vases, reliquary, relics purchased by Pope Leo X and garments belonging to him. The third area is the Sagrestia Nuova (New Sacristy) designed by MIchelangelo and built between 1520 and 1534. Michelangelo worked on a number of sculptures for this sacristy but only fully completed statues of two Dukes, four statues of the allegories Day and Night and Dawn and Dusk and the group of Madonna and Child placed on top of one of the sarcophagi. Unfortunately for the Medici, Michelangelo left for Rome before completing further works. You exit down a stairway to another crypt area before ascending more stairs to come out into a small courtyard were you exit onto the road. Unfortunately we left it too late to get tickets to Michelangelo's secret room beneath the chapels which books out months in advance.
    Visited January 2024
    Traveled with friends
    Written April 30, 2024
  • Ingeborg56
    Oslo, Norway2,354 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    My favorite place in Florence!
    The decorations are so grande, and the ceilings are so beautiful so I could sit there the whole afternoon just to admire them. I am so happy that I went here because it is so fantastic because of the colours and the very fine details! We were pleasantly surprised that we did not wait in line for a very long time to enter when we visited in last part of May, and I am very surprised that this is not higher up on the "Must places to visit" in Florence!
    Visited May 2024
    Traveled as a couple
    Written June 10, 2024
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.5
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HeaveNEarth
Fairfax, VA223 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023
If you studied the art when you're were young, then this is the holy place where "Julien (Giuliano)" sculpture, done by none other than Michelangelo, is located. You've probably done the drawings of him many times. You would be surrounded by incredible amounts and varieties of marble stones. It is connected to Basilica di San Lorenzo, BUT 9 Euro ticket to Basilica di San Lorenzo would NOT allow you to visit Cappelle Medicee. You need the separate 9 Euro (a bit expensive, but worth it) ticket for Capelle Medicee, which is located the opposite to the entrance to the Basilica di San Lorenzo. We skipped the Basilica and visited Cappelle Medicee only AND LOVE IT. Just buy the ticket at the Cappelle. Make sure you beat the Italian student groups to the entrance otherwise your Cappelle Medicee visit would be crowded as the whole place isn't that big.
Written March 27, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Riley s
1 contribution
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
I went here with a friend and we were greeted with a warm buona sera (good evening) and the rest of the night followed suit. Our main server (also likely the owner or a manager), Aldo, was super personable and made some great menu recommendations! My friend and I spent 3 hours here talking and eating and sipping limoncello. With a great atmosphere, excellent service and delicious food Le Cappelle Medicee is a must if you're in Florence!
Written February 1, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brun066
Florence, Italy13,124 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2021
I don't intend to write here about the most universally known part of the Medici Chapels, ie the one housing Michelangelo's sculptural masterpieces, but rather about the large octagonal hall surmounted by a dome, hosting the funeral monuments of the Medici Grand Dukes and commonly known as the "Cappella dei Principi" (Chapel of the Princes).
Featuring a gloomy and dark appearance, due to the color of the granite and marble used in the floor and walls, the hall has been effectively defined as a grandiose and sumptuous "funeral mantle", celebrating the glory of the Medici Grand Dukes, buried here from Cosimo I (dead 1574) onwards.
The hall also invites us to reflect on the slow and splendid decline both of the Medici dynasty, and of their Grand Duchy, during the long period from the 16th century until 1737 (the year of the dynasty's extinction). Indexes of this process are, for example, the stone inlays, of which we know that, although splendid, they are actually less sumptuous than those envisaged in the primitive project (which for example provided the interior of the dome covered with lapis lazuli panels). And even more eloquent is the lack, above the gigantic sarcophagi of the Grand Dukes in porphyry and granite, of the gilded bronze statues of each ruler, foreseen as depicted standing; statues which, however, are absent, except in the two cases of Ferdinand I and Cosimo II. The end of the dynasty, but above all the progressive thinning of the wealth of the state, account for this interruption in the decoration.
Taken together, all the elements I have described tell to us of a world of such powerful men on the earth, who gradually become less powerful, so that their effort to oppose the splendor of the graves to all-leveling death encounters evident difficulties.
For this reason, on the basis of a common Baroque propensity towards a gloomy vision of existence, this chapel is in my view as disturbing as the Capuchin Crypt in Vienna, even if it is less explicitly macabre.
Written January 21, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Exploring Chris
Calgary, Canada245 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2022
This is an ultra grand chapel dedicated to the permanent memory of one of the most rich and powerful families in the world. BE advised the old sacristy in the adjoining Basilica where the "pre-Lorenzo" Medici are interred is a separate gate and admission, but rest assured that this Chapel is the real Gem. It holds the tomb of Lorenzo and Giovanni as well as Cosimo the first and the later Drank Dukes. The main chapel is magnificent with a beautifully frescos dome and carefully crafted marble covering every visible surface. The sacristy holds the nearly finished marble tombs by Michelangelo that also a must see.
Written February 12, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sara G
110 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2022 • Solo
Genuinely, I think this may be the most beautiful building I visited in Italy. The colors of the rotunda and the different greens and reds of the marble was absolutely stunning. I went on a Saturday morning basically right when they opened, and there were 2 other people in the room. I loved it and would recommend.
Written December 31, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

mfilcol2014
Lisbon, Portugal1,769 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2022
The Medici Chapel is absolutely unmissable. The Medici family's pantheon reveals its power and wealth. Located next to the Basilica of S. Lourenço, it consists of two parts: The Princes' Chapel and the New Sacristy (designed by Michelangelo) Both are fabulous .In the New Sacristy it is worth noting the spectacular sculptures by Michelangelo -The Allegory of Time and the Medici Madonna. The Capela do Principes is a true spectacle of wealth and ostentation.
A word of advice: buy tickets online by appointment to avoid the long lines. The price is 9 euros which are well worth it.
Written June 22, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Chris B
Arlington, VA166 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2021
Beautiful chapel & great sculptures by Michelangelo commissioned by the Medici family make this well worth the visit. Be aware of the amended opening hours. It's best to visit in the morning as there were definitely less people. The chapel dome is amazing :)
Written October 6, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alpaslan
6 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2024 • Family
This chapel is a living, breathing reminder of why you must read a few paragraphs about a site you are about to visit before actually visiting the site. When my wife and I came here for a visit over a decade ago, we did not realize that the Michelangelo statues were in another much smaller room, and we just left after seeing the main chapel.

Thankfully, we are seasoned tourists now, and we went straight to the Michelangelo statues this time. These statues are some of the best I have ever seen from Michelangelo. I would go so far as to say that they are far better than any other Michelangelo statue in Florence with the obvious exception of the David in the Accademia Gallery. This is a must visit site if you are in Florence for more than a day trip, and if you do it efficiently by buying your ticket online, I promise it will only take 30 minutes.

We were in Florence for only one day. We took the fast train in Rome, and since the Medici Chapel was right on the road from the train station to the Duomo, we spared 30 minutes to see it. I would understand if other day trippers who are paranoid about time skipped it. But if you are in Florence for a day and a half or two days, after the Duomo, the Accademia, and the Uffizi, this is the next major site to see in my opinion.
Written April 7, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

westy54
Sydney, Australia11,515 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2024 • Friends
The Medici chapels are now separated from the the Church of San Lorenzo and have their own separate entrance off the Piazza di Madonna Degli Aldobrandin. Cost of entry was EUR9-00 per adult.

There are three separate areas being the crypt, where some of the Grand Dukes of Tuscany and their wives and some other lesser known members of the Medicis are buried.

The next area, after you walk up several spiral stairs, is the absolutely stunning marble edifice that is the Chapel of the Princes. This magnificent octagonal hall is over 30 metres high whilst its cupola (designed by Buontalentu) is approximately 60 metres high. The walls and floor are clad in a myriad of different coloured marble, granite, jasper and semi-precious stones. Side chapels hold the sarcophagi of the first six Grand Dukes of Tuscany including Cosimi I, II and III, Ferdinando I and II and Francesco I. Only two of the large bronze statues planned to sit in the niches above the sarcophagi were completed. Those being for Cosimo II and Ferdinando I. The Chapel of the Princes was built between 1604 and 1640 however the inlay of the semi-precious stones took longer to complete as did the frescoed cupola which was only completed in the early 19th century.

Behind the stunning, ornate altar are two small rooms that hold the Treasure of San Lorenzo which includes vases, reliquary, relics purchased by Pope Leo X and garments belonging to him.

The third area is the Sagrestia Nuova (New Sacristy) designed by MIchelangelo and built between 1520 and 1534. Michelangelo worked on a number of sculptures for this sacristy but only fully completed statues of two Dukes, four statues of the allegories Day and Night and Dawn and Dusk and the group of Madonna and Child placed on top of one of the sarcophagi. Unfortunately for the Medici, Michelangelo left for Rome before completing further works.

You exit down a stairway to another crypt area before ascending more stairs to come out into a small courtyard were you exit onto the road.

Unfortunately we left it too late to get tickets to Michelangelo's secret room beneath the chapels which books out months in advance.
Written May 1, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ArtsyGalBaltimore
Maryland847 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2022
Visited the Medici Chapel/ Chapel of the Princes on a dreary Friday. Ordered the tickets online, few visitors. The visit starts with a small museum housing an array of reliquaries with various relics of saints that were collected by the Medici's. Next is the chapel of the princes, quite a sumptuous marbled, domed room of Medici vaults. Of more artistic interest is the new sacristy, the subject of much study due to Michelangelo's sculptures and burial vault for Guiiano and Lorenzo Medici. For any kind of meaningful visit, do your homework ahead of time.
Written January 3, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Cappelle Medicee, Florence

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