Museo di San Marco
Museo di San Marco
4.5
8:15 AM - 1:45 PM
Monday
8:15 AM - 1:45 PM
Tuesday
8:15 AM - 1:45 PM
Wednesday
8:15 AM - 1:45 PM
Thursday
8:15 AM - 1:45 PM
Friday
8:15 AM - 1:45 PM
Saturday
8:15 AM - 1:45 PM
Sunday
8:15 AM - 1:45 PM
About
Opened to the public in 1869, this museum houses the largest collection of sacred art in Florence including a sweeping fresco by Giovanni Antonio Sogliani and a superb collection of works by Mariotto Albertinelli.
Duration: 1-2 hours
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Neighborhood: Florence Historic Center
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles2,011 reviews
Excellent
1,529
Very good
399
Average
67
Poor
11
Terrible
5

JurreSilbi
Krakow, Poland74 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
Museum is located in the Dominican convent, where Fra Angelico was a monk and a famous painter. His work is shown in a separate room at the ground level. Have a look at tabernaculum which is a great piece of art. The wooden frame was made by Ghirlandaio, another great artist. Ghirlandaio’s work, a polychromy in the refectory presenting the Last Supper is also on display. Have a deeper look at the face of Saint Paulus (the person with knife). Don’t miss the upper floor where there are monks’ rooms with paintings. Here it is time to recall another monk, Girolamo Savonarola who lived here, and his influence on the history of Florence and Medici family. Really dramatic times. And the library with a huge collection of books is also worth a visit.
This museum accepts Firenzecard. Be also prepared that some attractions might be closed even if they should be available, according to the schedule.
Written January 20, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sophie M
Paris, France505 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2020 • Solo
Florence is a beautiful city but after a while, seing so many beautiful museums can be exhausting. However this beautiful monetary was my favourite museum yet, because it is not a museum. There are about 30 cells in which Fra Angelico and his disciples painted beautiful frescos from the New Testament. The library is also very impressive. Do not miss this wonderful place.
Written August 15, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Gerald R
Newquay, UK76 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2020 • Couples
An oasis of calm and peace in amongst the hurly burly of Florence. Marvellous frescos.Gives you a real sense of how the monks lived and how inspired they would have been by the fresco in their cell. Hope folk take time to admire Ghirlandaio's last supper in the refectory as well as Fra Angelico's work. Marvellous place to visit.
Written September 13, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Helen W
23 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2020
IThis is a fantastic museum in an old monastery. The monks' cells were decorted with frescoes by Fra Angelico, and the fresco of the Annunciation at the top of the stairs as one goes up to the cells is one of the most celebrated images in Western art. This is a wonderful place, mainly because one has the opportunity to view art in the very place for which it was meant, rather than hanging on the wall in a museum. The fresco of the Last Supper by Ghirlandaio is so beautiful. Note the cherries arranged on the tablecloth. Some scholars think that they spell out the notes of a hymn. All in all, a beautiful, tranquil experience. Be aware that the museum is not open every day and that it is usually only open in the mornings.
Written January 6, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

GAN L
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia10,670 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
The museum is located on the old Dominican convent of San Marco in Piazza San Marco. In this museum, we visited the Chapter Room, the Lavabo Room, the Refectory, the Cloister of the Spesa and a small cloister of the XV century. There are magnificent frescoes to look at, in particular the Annunciation fresco on top of the staircase leading to the dormitories. The library houses an important collection of medieval , Renaissance and illuminated books.
Written March 10, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Cannuckk
Langley, Canada361 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2021 • Solo
My enjoyment of this museum was predicated on a couple of things. First, I had the benefit of downloading to my iPhone beforehand a free walking tour of the museum from Rick Steves Audio Europe, which went a long way towards educating a fine art novice like myself, why the frescos and altarpieces I was looking at were Important art treasures.
Secondly, I had watched the Netflix drama Medici, whose second season featured the historical character Savonarola, a former resident of the Convent and thorn in the side of the Medici family, whose living quarters are featured on the upper floor of the museum.
Both of these background sources if you wish to access them may help the casual visitor.
If you use the suggested audio tour, which is just under an hour long, reserve some additional time to read the posted narrative signs and enjoy exhibits not especially featured in the tour. I had only allocated a bit over an hour to see the museum, and wished I had allowed for more.
The 8 euro admission cost is a relative bargain.
Written October 29, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brad
Hong Kong, China173,079 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2024 • Family
This is a wonderful museum found within the convent section of the Basilica di San Marco at the piazza by the same name. Opening hours are 8.15am to 1.50pm daily (closed on Tuesdays) and entry is now €11 per adult. You can book online in advance or pay at the entrance on the day you intend to visit. We visited around 8.30am recently and found no queue upon arrival.

The convent history dates back to the 12th-century. However, what you see today is much to do with expansion works by Italian architect Michelozzo in the 15th-century. Importantly, the museum is noted for its remarkable collection works by Italian Renaissance Master Fra. Angelico. You'll see numerous highlights including The Annunciation in the upstairs dormitory section of the museum. This is probably one of the most recognisable early Renaissance artworks in the world. There are sections of the museum dedicated to famed preacher Savonarola and a fresco lined outdoor cloister amongst other interesting things to see within Museo San Marco. Best to allow at minimum 1 hour and considerably longer if you are a particular fan of Fra Angelico works.

Note: While the convent and cloister require ticked entry. The church at Basilica di San Marco is free to visit. It can be entered directly through the Baroque style church entrance directly on the square. Given the limited morning opening house, I'd suggest visiting the museum first and the church second.
Written April 6, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

BaruchBarryPinnick
Ma'ale Adumim, Israel217 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2022
This museum is a gem. If you are a fan of Fra Angelico or Savonarola, this is your place. The frescoes in the monks' cells are worth a visit in themselves. The museum is well-organised and is considerably less busy than many other sites in the city.
Written November 28, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

top-trippers
Bolton, UK624 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2022
We popped in here early one morning, after our visit to the Bargello. Many of the walls of this Dominican monastery were decorated in pre-Renaissance times, by Father Angelico, and his pupils. The tour begins in the Cloister of St. Antoninus featuing some beautiful lunettes. The Guest Room, where pilgrims were received, is now a gallery for many wonderful panel paintings by Fra Angelico.Head to the Chapter House for his complex and allegorical Crucifixion. Don’t miss the Refectories. The small refectory is dominated by Domenico Ghirlandaio’s Last Supper. I loved the detail in this painting – the crockery, decanters, knives, bread etc. The lunettes above the table are filled with large trees and birds in flight, an open window frames a perching peacock, and a cat waits for scraps.

The tour continues on the first floor. At the top of the stairs, you will see Fra Angelico’s Annunciation. You can then peek into 43 monks cells which are decorated with simple frescoes, many by Fra Angelico. The last three cells (12-14) at the end of the corridor to the left, were once used by Girolamo Savonarola before he was hanged and in Piazza della Signoria. At the end of the corridor to the right, Cells 38 and 39 were reserved as a spiritula retreat for the Medici Cosimo the Elder.
Written August 27, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

982rodneyl
Grande Prairie, Canada160 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2021
San Marco is easy to miss given all the attractions of Florence. Fabulous frescos in the portals of a massive courtyard. Frescos are superb, the museum collection is extensive and even the monks cells have frescos.
Written October 16, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Museo di San Marco - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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