Chiesa di San Giacomo di Rialto

Chiesa di San Giacomo di Rialto, Venice: Hours, Address, Chiesa di San Giacomo di Rialto Reviews: 4/5

Chiesa di San Giacomo di Rialto

Chiesa di San Giacomo di Rialto
4
Architectural Buildings • Churches & Cathedrals
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
The area
Address
Neighborhood: San Marco
The most famous sestiere (district) in Venice has one of the world's most famous squares, St. Mark's (Piazza San Marco). Anchored on one end by the basilica, clustered around it are restaurants, museums, shops, orchestras playing in the square, pigeons, the grand pink Doge’s Palace (Palazzo Ducale), the soaring campanile bell tower, an astrological clock tower, plus gorgeous cafes and restaurants like Florian and Quadri. Piazza San Marco is beloved by Venetians themselves. They book a table anytime, which offers a buffer from the fray. This grand outdoor drawing room attracts Venetians for a stroll too, especially late in the afternoon when the hoards of daytrippers thin out. It's simply a grand place to meet.
Popular mentions

4.0
216 reviews
Excellent
58
Very good
114
Average
41
Poor
2
Terrible
1

Asiyah Noemi K
Pula, Croatia4,583 contributions
Oct 2020
This beautiful church is located in the small square of Campo San Giacomo (which is the main market of Venice) next to the magnificent Rialto Bridge. Just looking at the church suggests that it is something special. According to local Venetian tradition, it is the oldest church in Venice, built in 421 by a carpenter named Candioto or Eutinopo. The history of this church is closely connected with the origin of the Venetian market, which began to take shape in the 12th century. On the outer wall of the apse of the church stands an inscription from the 12th century calling on the merchants of the market to be honest. Interestingly, by order of the doge Marin Grimani, the church floor was erected in 1601 to avoid flooding during the Venetian high waters (acqua alta). San Giacomo di Rialto is a small church, with an unusual bell tower, a Gothic portico (the only one of its kind in the whole city) and a large clock from the 15th century, which is well received by local merchants. Currently, is the museum for musical instruments. Beautiful church.
Written November 8, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Erika
Caracas, Venezuela9,289 contributions
Aug 2020
Close to the Rialto Bridge. Very small simple church with a big clock. Is worth the visit just to see the architecture.
Written September 5, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Raffiella11
Leicestershire, UK4,664 contributions
Feb 2020
A large Campo, with Renaissance arcades at the foot of the Rialto Bridge in San Polo.

Centuries ago the buildings were used as offices for courts, plus areas concerned with trade, supplies and finance. In 16 century boats would dock at the side of here to unload there goods from the far east, ship captains would gather here to hear about arrivals/departures

A very unassuming Campo was the business heart of the Venetian Empire, it has the oldest chuch in Venice with a beautiful large clock and a bell tower with three bells - opposite the 16th-century granite figure of the Gobbo di Rialto, the famous ‘hunchback’.

Underneath those arches the first banking took place in the Banco Giro, the second modern bank established in Venice in 1619 (after the Banco di Rialto)- this is now a great wine bar and restaurant upstairs - this is a favourite of ours for mid morning chardonnay or lunch.

This is a great area, always very busy and plenty to see.
Written June 27, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Raffiella11
Leicestershire, UK4,664 contributions
Feb 2020
After crossing the famous Rialto Bridge on the San Polo side of the city you may just walk by the square, where you will find the beautiful church of San Giacomo di Rialto on your right.

The first church built in Venice, as early as the 5th century. in 1514 it miraculously survived the fire that burnt down the rest of the Rialto. . 1601 they added a frontage to make the church look like an huge mantel piece clock, the small bell tower is Baroque, the five columned porch is the only original one in the city, the small bell tower

If you stand for a while, you will notice the clock’s hands get stuck in the same place , you can never tell the true time.

Take time to pop inside to see the Veneto-Byzantine interior which is a mixture of a small basilica and a Greek cross, do not miss the statue of St James with Angels at the main altar.
Written June 19, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

durham05
Durham, UK1,231 contributions
Feb 2020 • Solo
Had to come here twice as the first time I came st 4.15 to find all the instrument display cases covered over. Well worth a second trip as the instruments are very old. However the shop is really unbelievably expensive. 5 euros for a simple fridge magnet. 15 for a basic guide book. They'd make more money if they were more reasonable. Left without buying anything.
Written February 18, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Alessandro F
Milan, Italy25,475 contributions
Dec 2019 • Solo
Popular tradition speaks of this church with origins in 421 built by citizens of Padua.
The facade is characterized by the large clock, the portico and the bell tower over the top with only one wall.
Inside with three naves with several beautiful paintings and statues.
It’s the church of Rialto a few steps from the popular bridge.
Written December 30, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Mairwen1
United Kingdom5,225 contributions
May 2019 • Couples
Venice’s oldest church is only 3 minutes away from the Rialto Bridge and yet it is quite uncrowded and quiet - you won’t be jostled by crowds or have to duck selfie sticks here.
It is not a must-see but entry is free and it is a very interesting diversion, especially if you want to escape the hordes. We stopped by, had a quick look & enjoyed taking some photos, esp of Il Gobbo and the beautiful 24- hour clock with the golden hand.

It’s main claim to fame is that it’s almost certainly the oldest church in Venice. The records get a bit vague but the church was possibly built as early as 421. It has a great story too - I loved this one. A carpenter, Candioto, was trapped in a huge fire and, afraid that he’d be burnt alive, he made a desperate deal with St Giacomo. If he escaped, he would build a church for the saint. He survived and kept his promise. Weirdly, over a century later another huge fire swept through the Rialto area in 1514 and destroyed everything – except for this church. Miraculously, it was the sole survivor.

LOOK OUT FOR:
• The special clock hand with a golden sun design
• The strange looking porch at the front. I’ve not seen this before but apparently it was quite common in ancient churches. Only two are still left in Venice.
• Imagine the front of the church crowded with bankers and money-changers. From 1097 Rialto was the financial and commercial heart of Venice and the market and bankers operated right out the front here.
• Don't miss Il Gobbo Di Rialto (Hunchback). Look across from the church for the granite sculpture of a naked man hunched over, supporting a small flight of steps and carrying a pedestal on his back. The Doges’ messengers stood here to read the news of the day and to make official proclamations. (in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice, where Shylock asks “What news on the Rialto?”)
• Il Gobbo was also used in the punishment of minor criminals like petty thieves. Instead of jail, they could be stripped naked, then have to run from Piazza San Marco to the Rialto. Crowds would line the streets and jeer and throw things at them but once then they made it to Il Gobbo, they could end the punishment by kissing the statue.
• Inside there’s a small collection of antique stringed instruments - hurdy-gurdies, violins, mandolins, lutes going back to 16th century.
Written August 4, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

David S
Middlesbrough, UK1,273 contributions
Jul 2019 • Couples
Just round the corner from the iconic Rialto Bridge, this is a hidden gem. Very tranquil, with lots of original features. Well worth the effort to pop in and reflect.
Written July 22, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Vadim
Murmansk, Russia21,628 contributions
Aug 2018 • Family
San Giacomo di Rialto is the oldest Church in Venice that can be seen from it. She was already supposedly consecrated in the year 421. Learn San Giacomo is not difficult. By the clock, the dial of which is divided into 24 parts. Opposite the entrance to the Church there is a pedestal, where the laws were announced (at the same time on piazza San Marco). Sculpture of the XVI century, known as "Hunchback" (Gobbo di Rialto), holds a pedestal. The hunchback's grimace appeals to the cruel laws of Venice, which was the equivalent of justice in the middle ages. A lover of high art there is nothing to look for, it is a Church for their own. Traders'. The Church is also reminiscent of the market. Merchants each guise of product had special altars, and they vowed their sacred not to cheat. However, the mercenary nature took often his and they quickly atone for sin. Fortunately, Christians have it easy. Trading capital was transformed into Bank capital in full accordance with what Karl Marx and Fernand Braudel described. Merchants were replaced by moneylenders and money changers. Bankers replaced the last ones. These could atone for sins daily.
Written June 11, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

artistJoan
Holbrook, NY293 contributions
Apr 2019 • Solo
I have passed this building many times without realizing it was a church. It was tony But Impressive. I think there are about 6 or 8 piews in the church. It is one if the oldest churches in Venice and lovely! There are also wonderful old srptringed instruments on display. Worth stopping I !
Written April 23, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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